College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Chemistry


This page was created at 9:13 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Chemistry
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CHEM

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Chemistry.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Chemistry this week go to What's New This Week.

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CHEM 447. Physical Methods of Analysis.

Section 100 Exams 6:00 8:00 P.M. Tuesday, Oct 2, Oct 30, And Nov 20.

Instructor(s): Mark Meyerhoff (mmeyerho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260 and 241/242. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~chem447/

This course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chromatographic separation techniques, and contemporary electroanalytical chemistry are stressed. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced. TEXT: Principles Instrumental Analysis, Skoog, Holler, Nieman, 5th edition, Houghton Mifflin (Required).

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CHEM 451 / BIOLCHEM 451. Introduction to Biochemistry I.

Section 100 Exams 6:00 8:00 P.M. Mon., Oct 1, Oct 29, And Nov 19.

Instructor(s): Carol Fierke (fierke@umich.edu) , Charles Yocum (cyocum@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260; Biol. 162; and Math. 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the first in a two-term sequence designed for biochemistry concentrators. Emphasis is on developing the capacity of the students to think about complex biological processes in terms of the underlying chemistry. An introductory section on proteins is followed by sections on enzymes and coenzymes. The discussion of biochemical energetics includes sections on glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, electron transport, photosynthesis, and carbohydrate metabolism. The course has three lectures and one discussion per week. There are three hour exams and a final exam. TEXT: Biochemistry, Voet & Voet, 2nd edition, Wiley (Required).

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CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I.

Section 100 Exams 6:00 8:00 P.M. Tues, Oct 9 And Nov 6. Meets with Chem. 570.100

Instructor(s): Henry Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260, Phys. 240 (or 260), and Math. 215. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 260/461/463. Chemistry 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in Chemistry 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 462, 1 credit) in the same term that Chemistry 461 is taken.

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CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I.

Section 200 Meets with Chem. 570.200

Instructor(s): Robert Kuczkowski (kuczkows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 260, Phys. 240 (or 260), and Math. 215. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/chem/461/200.nsf

This section is designed to introduce students to a more thorough, research-oriented view of Physical Chemistry. Required for Honors Chemistry concentrators.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 260/461/463. Chemistry 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in Chemistry 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (Chemistry 462, 1 credit) in the same term that Chemistry 461 is taken.

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CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Henry Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 461. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in Chemistry 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the second term of Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 461, 3 credits) in the same term that Chemistry 462 is taken.

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CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory.

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Henry Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 461. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in Chemistry 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the second term of Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 461, 3 credits) in the same term that Chemistry 462 is taken.

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CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory.

Section 300.

Instructor(s): Henry Griffin (hcg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 461. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in Chemistry 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the second term of Physical Chemistry (Chemistry 461, 3 credits) in the same term that Chemistry 462 is taken.

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CHEM 463. Physical Chemistry II.

Section 100 Exams 6:00-8:00 P.M. On Tues, Oct 9 And Nov 6. Meets with Chem. 575.100.

Instructor(s): David Lubman (dmlubman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461/462. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the third of the three-term physical chemistry sequence Chemistry 260/461/463 and builds on material presented in both previous courses. The rigorous mathematical theory of classical thermodynamics will be developed, including applications to entropy, heat engines, solution properties, and phase and chemical equilibria. Modern statistical thermodynamics will be introduced. Modern theories of fundamental reaction rates will be used built on the phenomenological kinetics introduced in Chemistry 260. Methods for determining and understanding solid state structures will be discussed, building on group theory introduced in Chemistry 461. TEXT: Physical Chemistry, Laidler-Meiser, 3rd edition, Houghton-Mifflin (Required).

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CHEM 507. Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Dimitri Coucouvanis (dcouc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Structural concepts relating to inorganic and organometallic compounds, inorganic stereochemistry, crystal chemistry, coordination theory, ligand field theory, catalysis, and generalizations about the periodic table. TEXT: Inorganic Chemistry, Huheey, 4th edition (optional).

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CHEM 511. Materials Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): David Curtis (mdcurtis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461 or equivalent, Biochem 415, Chem 430 or equivalent. Permission of course director. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course presents concepts in materials chemistry. The main topics covered include structure and characterization, macroscopic properties, and synthesis and processing.

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CHEM 520 / BIOPHYS 520. Biophysical Chemistry I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erik R P Zuiderweg (zuiderwe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 463, Biol. Chem. 415, or Chem 420; permission of course director. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Biophysics 520.001.

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CHEM 525 / BIOLOGY 525. Chemical Biology I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Richard Goldstein (richardg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chemistry 451, 452, 461, and 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first of a two course sequence in Chemical Biology. The intent of these courses is to introduce students to the breadth of material contained within the inherently interdisciplinary "Chemical Biology" arena. The course has been designed to cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries of Chemistry. Thus, rather than having traditional bioorganic, bioinorganic, and biophysical sections, the course will focus on case studies chosen so that over the course of the two-term sequence, all of the key concepts in the traditional chemical disciplines are discussed.

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CHEM 538 / MACROMOL 538. Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Adam Matzger (matzger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 215/216, and 230 or 260. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chemistry of monomer and polymer synthesis; Mechanistristic analysis of reactions. Stereochemistry of polymer structures both natural and synthetic. Scope of subject matter: free radical and ionic polymerization, condensation polymerization, ring opening and nonclassical polymerization. Special topics from the recent literature. TEXT: Polymers: Chemistry and Physics of Modern Material, Cowie, Intl Specialized Book Service (Required).

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CHEM 540. Organic Principles.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Edwin Vedejs (edved@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 312 and 461. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Principles of chemical bonding, mechanisms of organic chemical reactions, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis. The important types of organic reactions are discussed. Basic principles are emphasized; relatively little attention is paid to the scope and synthetic applications of the reactions. TEXT: Advaned Organic Chemistry: Structure & Mechanisms, Carey and Sundberg, 4th edition, Kluwer (Required).

Problem Solving Session in 1300 Chemistry Building, Monday, 7:008:30 p.m.

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CHEM 543. Organic Mechanisms.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): William Roush (roush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 215/216. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to propose and write reasonable mechanisms for organic reactions, including complex multi-step processes. Knowledge of the details of the fundamental organic reaction processes will also be gained. TEXT: The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms, Grossman, 1998, Springer-Verlag (Required).

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CHEM 545. Analytical Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Richard Sacks (rdsacks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 447, 461. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course emphasizes the fundamental scientific and technological principles underlying modern analytical chemistry, with an emphasis on bioanalytical chemistry. Major topics of the current offering include chemometrics, biopolymer solution chemistry and physics, diffusive and convective transport processes in separation systems and principles of microfabricated instrumentation and sensors. General principles will be illustrated with applications from current analytical chemistry practice.

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CHEM 567 / AOSS 567. Chemical Kinetics.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): John Gland (gland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461 or AOSS 479. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chemical Kinetics is the study of the rates and mechanisms of systems undergoing chemical change. The extraction of rate data from reacting systems and the utilization of such data in other reacting systems is central to chemistry in the laboratory and in the practical worlds of combustion science, atmospheric science, and chemical synthesis. This course introduces the treatment of complex chemical systems and fundamental ideas about chemical reaction rates in gases and in solutions. Computer software will be utilized to treat complex reaction systems.

COURSE OUTLINE.

  • BASIC CONCEPTS: Definitions, Elementary Reaction Rate Laws, Phenomenology.
  • "MACROSCOPIC" KINETICS: Complex Reaction Mechanisms, Kinetic Measurements, Data Analysis, Numerical Solutions.
  • "MICROSCOPIC" KINETICS: Collision Dynamics, Measurements, Statistical Theories, Dynamics in Solution.
  • IMPORTANT APPLICATIONS: Atmospheric Chemistry, Combustion Chemistry.

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CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 461.100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Chem. 461 and 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 461.100.

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CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry.

Section 200 Meets with Chemistry 461.200.

Instructor(s): Robert Kuczkowski (kuczkows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461 and 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 461.200.

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CHEM 571. Quantum Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Eitan Geva (eitan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 570; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Constitutes with 576 a full course for students specializing in physical chemistry. Review of quantum mechanics from a postulational viewpoint; variational and matrix methods, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory; applications to molecular systems including potential energy surfaces and reaction pathways. TEXT: Quantum Mechanics: Volume One, Cohen-Tannoudji, Diu, Laloe, 1978, Wiley (Required); Quantum Mechanics: Volume Two, Cohen-Tannoudji et al, 1978, Wiley (Required); Molecular Quantum Mechanics, Atkins, Friedman, 3rd edition, Oxford (Required); Modern Quantum Mechanics, Sakurai, 1994, Addison Wesley (Recommended).

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CHEM 575. Chemical Thermodynamics.

Section 100 Meets with Chemistry 463.100.

Instructor(s): David Lubman (dmlubman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Chem. 461. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chemistry 463.100.

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CHEM 597. Introduction to Graduate Research.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Dmitri Coucouvanis (dcouc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U." May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

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CHEM 598. Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training Program (IGERT) Research Rotation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit four times.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this program, we are seeking to bring together disciplines that are concerned with materials on a scale from the nanoscopic to the microscopic. These length scales for materials bridge the gap between the molecular (chemical) and the micron scale of devices. Chemists are increasingly concerned with complex "supramolecular" arrays, whereas the electronics engineers strive to decrease the sizes of their devices to molecular dimensions. The length scales associated with these disciplines are converging. Unfortunately, the language and laboratory skills that have evolved at the twoextremes are quite different, making communication difficult. We envision a program that brings together these disciplines, creates a common language, and will produce a new generation of students skilled in molecularly designed materials. The course helps students establish "critical literacy" in areas outside their core expertise is our proposed research group rotation (RGR). In the RGR, a student will select 3 research mentors with whom three, short-term research projects will be carried out. Each project will include a definition of the problem, a literature search, some laboratory work, and a final written report The student must interview a minimum of 5 prospective research mentors before choosing the three RGR mentors. The RGR student will take part in the full life of the host research laboratory, including participating in all group meetings, seminar activities, etc. of the host laboratory/department. At least one of the three research rotations must be outside the students home department and may include a summer term at a participating industrial or government laboratory.

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CHEM 599. Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program Research Rotation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program, a unique multidisciplinary Ph.D. training program, focuses on the fundamental underlying chemical principles that govern all biological processes. This dynamic new program emphasizes mechanistic and synthetic aspects of research at the chemistry biology interface and leads to a Ph.D. degree in either Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, or Medicinal Chemistry. Students enrolled in the program will gain a broad appreciation of the chemical foundations of biology including synthesis, analysis, and theory and will be prepared to pursue research on a vast array of critical biological problems in academic or industrial settings. Three different University of Michigan departments Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Medicinal Chemistry have combined strengths to create this challenging new program. Each student's course of study is tailored to suit his or her individual goals and includes laboratory rotations in at least two of the participating University departments. To learn more about research in an industrial setting, students will also be encouraged to perform a rotation at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories adjacent to the University's North Campus. The CBI Training Program offers students the unique opportunity to participate in laboratory rotations at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories in the following areas:

  1. Medicinal chemistry
  2. Peptides
  3. Structure-based design chemistry
  4. Exploratory chemistry
  5. Computational chemistry
  6. Molecular modeling
  7. Bioorganic chemistry
  8. Structural biology
  9. Analytical research
  10. Combinatorial chemistry
  11. Automated chemical synthesis
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CHEM 648. Spectroscopic and Electrochemical Analysis.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Morris

Prerequisites: Chem. 447 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/chem/648/100.nsf

Theory, practice, and application of spectrochemical techniques for analysis and research with emphasis on emission and absorption spectroscopy in the principal regions of electromagnetic spectrum.

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CHEM 800. Seminar in Chemical Biology.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2). May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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CHEM 801. Seminar in Analytical Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 802. Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 803. Seminar in Organic Chemistry.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 805. Materials Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 806. Departmental Tuesday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 807. Departmental Thursday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 808. Departmental Friday Seminar.

Section 100.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

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CHEM 895. Research in Chemistry.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of Graduate Committee. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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CHEM 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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CHEM 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

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CHEM 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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