College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 9:15 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Comparative Literature
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMPLIT

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Comparative Literature.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Comparative Literature this week go to What's New This Week.

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COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 001 The Arabian Nights.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer a reading of The Book of A Thousand and One Nights, its histories, traditions, translations, adaptations, transmutations and violations, throughout the second millennium, from the tenth century Middle East to the twentieth century Hollywood. It will follow the emergence of the frame story, and the formation of some of the basic tales, through an astonishing interaction between the Arabic "original" and the French "translation" of Galland in the beginning of the eighteenth century. Discussions will revolve around a selection of English translations of different tales; issues of cross-cultural translation; ways in which different translators from different cultures and persuasions dealt with violence, desire and gender in the Nights; the appropriations of the book in the East and West: in film, theater, music, literature, etc. A special attention will be paid to Borges, Barth, and Rushdie, while comparatively exploring issues of narrative strategies, intertextual mappings, migratory motifs, and Orientalism. Students will be evaluated through class performance, two short essays presented in class, and a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 002 Intersections of Life and Art: Impressions of a Turkish Author. Meets with MENAS 490.001.

Instructor(s): Ahmet Husrev Altan

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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COMPLIT 600. Topics in Theory.

Section 001 Value and Valuation

Instructor(s): James I Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jport/courses/cl/Value.html

The first part of a two-part introductory sequence to Comparative Literature, this course will explore the intersection of literature, aesthetics, and the discourse of value in the sphere of culture. Conceived as providing a foundation for future study in any number of disciplines both within and beyond comparative literature, the seminar is intended for anyone interested in any one or all three of these elements.

Problem areas to be discussed will include beauty, the sublime, literary value, moral value, political economy, classical values and classicism, canonicity, the anthropology of value, and the emergence of criticism (evaluation) as a cultural and professional category.

Readings will be drawn from various places, including Aristophanes, Aristotle, Longinus, Winckelmann, Adam Smith, Kant, Marx, Arnold, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Mukarovsky, T.S. Eliot, Wittgenstein, Adorno, Althusser, Barbar Herrnstein Smith, Bourdieu, Eagleton, Nancy Munn, Scarry, Nehamas, and Guillory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 698. Directed Reading in Comparative Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 750. Seminar: Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 Postmodern Politics.

Instructor(s): Vassilios Lambropoulos (vlambrop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine postmodern and poststructuralist political ideas with an emphasis on those which have influenced literary theory and cultural studies over the last forty years. Connections will be sought and questioned between the politics of governance and the politics of interpretation. Readings will include, among others, Gramsci, Schmitt, Arendt, Adorno, Fanon, Foucault, Lefort, Deleuze, Habermas, Rawls, Rorty, Negri, Laclau/Malcolm X, and MacKinnon.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 770. Seminar: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Psychoanalysis & Feminist Theory.

Instructor(s): Julia Hell (hell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we will explore the often tense relationship between psychoanalysis and feminist theory. We will start with Freud's key texts on sexual difference and femininity. This part of the seminar will be followed by an in-depth discussion of, first, Luce Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman, and second, Juliet Mitchell's Psychoanalysis and Feminism. While Irigaray aims at a radical deconstruction of psychoanalysis, Mitchell tries to re-appropriate the insights of Freud and Lacan for a feminist theory of subjectivity, and politics. From this first staging of a debate about psychoanalysis and feminism, we will then move to a series of specific topics: 1. The concept of hysteria which we will trace from Freud's early writings to Helen Cixous/Catherine Clement: The Newly Born Woman to Mitchell's most recent book, Madmen and Medusas: reclaiming Hysteria; 2. the notion of feminine masquerade (Joan Riviere) and gender as performance (Judith Butler); 3. The notion of feminine writing (Julia Kristeva). In the last part of the course, we will focus on literary texts by Ingeborg Bachmann, Elfriede Jelinek, Alexandra Kollontai, and Marguerite Duras.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; advanced undergraduates (meeting with instructor required before registration).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 790. Seminar in Literary Theory.

Section 001 Postcolonial Studies Course on Concepts of Hybridity, Mimicry, Transculturation..

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Postcolonial studies has emerged as a productive theoretical response to the complex relationship between colonial discourse and the social, political, and cultural formation of colonial and formerly colonial societies. This seminar asks, what is 'post' and what is 'colonial' in postcolonial studies? Taking Said's Orientalism as a point of departure, the seminar examines Said's contribution to postcolonial studies and goes on to look at critical responses and possible shortcomings of the field.

In so doing, the seminar deals with various forms of imperial practice by examining British, German and Ottoman historical contexts. Further, we inquire into the construction of the colonial subject, racializing concepts imbedded in colonial power and intersections of class, gender and colonialism. Discussing concepts of mimicry, performativity and 'ethnomasquerade', we will analyze the function of miming the Other

within the (post)colonial framework. Seminar readings will include texts which exemplify the 'hybrid' character of postcolonial societies and their abiding forms of racial, ethnic and cultural Otherness. Hence, exploring the connection between travel writing, the literary imagination and colonial discourse will be one of our main aims.

In addition to a range of historical, literary and visual sources, we will deal with interdisciplinary theoretical work by Bhabha, Dening, Hall, McClintock, Pratt, Said, Spivak, Thomas, Trinh, Young and Zantop. Students will be required to submit a research paper at the end of the semester and to give an oral presentation based on the weekly readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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