College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 11:41 AM on Thu, Oct 4, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for English.


ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Reading Old English. Meets with English 501.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first object of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison and the Artist.

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Research And Technology In The Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf01/415f01syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Nancy Reinhardt

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The premieres of Mozart's Die Zauberflote (1791) and Wagner's Tristan and Isolde (1865) bracket the first half of the nineteenth century, a period of major cultural and political change. In only six decades Europe experienced the French Revolution, Napoleon, the revolutions of 1848/52, the emergence of new international identities, the flowering of Romanticism and the beginnings of Naturalism. This course examines the two operas as representations of change. We will look at each opera in detail, comparing the libretti and their literary sources, musical structure and the use of motifs, performance history and audience response. Requirements: regular class participation, weekly listening and study assignments,two short essays, a final research paper or project. (No background in opera is required for this course). (Reinhardt)

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ENGLISH 427 / THTREMUS 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO

Prerequisites: English 327. Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 The Poetics of the Invisible.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This will be a semester of writing poems that consider what happens at the limits of what may be observed through both microscopes and telescopes, two simultaneous journeys, one probing the boundaries of the internal (a single cell, for instance) the other probing the boundaries of the external (the cosmos, for instance) in order to arrive at a poetry of limits, in order to craft an approach to poetry that emphasizes those stances in which observation is less certain and in which observed behavior tends to depart from convention (where too much poetry is currently formed). Simultaneous concerns, of course, include: what the journey makes us feel, the consequences of emotion, the effects of this journey on ideas of the future, on meaning, and on memory. We will have to shed whatever dependencies we may have on comfortable assumptions in order to accomplish this. We will focus on what happens to existence, to a sense of self, and attempts to navigate existence at the boundaries of knowledge. Texts may include: Verse and Universe, Powers of Ten, On the Surface of Things, and Sphereland.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/english/431/001.nsf

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature 1837-1901 combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorian novelists put all of these elements in the pot and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring readers back for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day e.g., the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. What is arguably most interesting about these novels is the complicted relationship they had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code was liable and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. These oddly subversive elements will provide the focus of this course. We will read classic novels by C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, possibly Trollope and Stevenson, and John Fowles' post-modern novel about 19th-century life and fiction, The French Lieutenant's Woman. There will also be brief selections from intellectual and cultural documents, provided on our Website. Requirements include a midterm and final and two essays, regular class attendance and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a range of novels written by writers born in the United States, whose voices help to comprise a richly textured and complex American literary canon and tradition. We will begin this course by discerning the "birth" of the "American" novel, and how nationalism aided in constructing an American literary tradition. We will read novels by Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, E.L. Doctorow, and Toni Morrison, to name a few. The course requirements are two 10-15 page essays, midsemester examination and final examination. Lack of attendance will negatively affect your grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, and Wallace Stevens but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001 Drama From Ibsen To Brecht

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the rise of modern drama in the Western world by concentrating on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Brecht. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to read a dramatic text for its performative qualities and its potential for enactment. Although no previous experience in the study of drama or theater is required, the course will begin by concentrating on the differences between the modern repertory and the forms we associate with Classical and Shakespearean dramatic conventions. Other topics of consideration include: the transformation from melodrama to modern drama; the social consciousness of the twentieth-century stage; and the rise of the female figure as subject of dramatic inquiry. Requirements: There will be three papers of 5-7 pages each; a midterm; and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Dickenson and Whitman. Meets with American Culture 498.001.

Instructor(s): James H Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will read a generous selection of both these major nineteenth-century American poets in an historical and critical context. Since Emerson was an important influence on both Whitman and Dickinson, we'll spend a bit of time with him too. During the first three weeks we'll study poems from the 1855 and 1856 Leaves of Grass. Then, after a class on Emerson, we'll focus on Dickinson during the last three weeks before spring break, especially on her conception of the value of poetry and her struggles with her religious heritage. After the break, we'll return to the later Whitman of "Calamus," "Sea-Drift," and the Civil War poems, before finishing with three more weeks on Dickinson, focusing on her poems of death, pain, consolation, and immortality. Students will be asked to write a short paper on Whitman, a short paper on Dickinson, a longer (10-page) paper on a topic of their own choosing, and bi-weekly response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Gender And Queer Theory.

Instructor(s): Anne C Hermann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to the assumptions and permutations of gender and queer theory as a way to understand what difference they make to the reading of literary texts. Gender as the relationship between masculine and feminine and queer as the mismatch between sex, gender, and desire have informed questions from why has there been no female Shakespeare to what would it mean to "queer" a text? The class will distinguish between French and Anglo-American feminist understandings of language, gay and lesbian literary criticism, a queer canon, and queer readings of canonized literature. Likely texts are Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Toril Moi's Sexual/Textual Politics, and Annamarie Jagose's Queer Theory: An Introduction, as well as various literary theoretical approaches to a single text such as Toni Morrison's Sula or E.M. Forster's Maurice. Assignments include a short paper and a longer research paper in several stages. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 489 / EDUC 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001 Concurr Reg In 201-307-008.

Instructor(s): Lesley Ann Rex

Prerequisites: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rex/440syllf99.html

We take the view in designing this course that there is not a "one size fits all" method or approach to teaching English. What and how to teach English depends upon who and what is being taught, the teaching and learning circumstances, and one's instructional goals all of which are time, location and situation dependant. Therefore, English teachers need to make many decisions about what and how to teach, know where to look for resources, be able to read their students, their classrooms, and their teaching situations in order to both plan ahead, act effectively in the moment, assess the efficacy of their curriculum and instructional approach, and redesign as necessary. Ascertaining what methods and curriculum best suit one's students and the best strategies for using them, should be based on well informed understandings of English teaching and learning, on the educational standards toward which one is directing one's efforts, and on one's personal principles of educational philosophy. We have designed ED440 to bring forward many of the issues, practices, methods, and theories we think you need to tackle as beginning English teachers. In addition, since we take the long view of how one becomes an effective teaching professional, we have planned a curriculum that will point you in a direction for growing and developing as effective educators beyond the information provided by this course.

You will read about the latest in English curriculum and teaching methods from the point of view of an experienced, exemplary English teacher and participate in class activities that apply some of them. You will, via technology, visit the classrooms of nationally recognized Michigan English teachers. You will attend Michigan's annual state conference in Lansing, where you will learn about best practices from and with current English teachers. In addition, several former ED440 students who are currently student teaching or teaching will talk about their experiences and answer questions. In-class activity will include discussions of issues and topics raised in the readings and your classroom observations, the practice of particular techniques and strategies such as collaborative learning, the design of a curriculum unit for teaching a young adult novel, and the building of a teaching portfolio.

Required Texts: The English Teacher's Companion (Burke) and How Far Would You Have Gotten If I Hadn't Called You Back? (Hobbs) can be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 S. State St.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 489 / EDUC 440. Teaching of English.

Section 002 Concurr Reg In 201-307-014.

Instructor(s): Anne Ruggles Gere

Prerequisites: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 489 / EDUC 440. Teaching of English.

Section 003 M A C Students Only.

Instructor(s): John L Stratman

Prerequisites: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 501 / GERMAN 501. Old English.

Section 001 Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. You will also develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 516. Literary Research and the Computer.

Section 001 Research And Technology In The Humanities. Meets with English 415.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., websites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impact of technology. By the middle of the semester, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation. Prospective students may want to look at the course website for the last offering of this course, located at http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html or click the link from Professor Rabkin's homepage http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin. Probably the most pertinent and interesting point on this site to check is the "Class Roster & Projects" page and the syllabus itself. Further queries can be addressed to Professor Rabkin, preferably by e-mail but also by phone or during his office hours. Check with the receptionist for contact information.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 520. Introduction to Graduate Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): June M Howard (jmhoward@umich.edu), Andrea Kelly Henderson

Prerequisites: Open to English Language and Literature and Women's Studies students only. Graduate standing. (3). A required course for first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies graduate students only.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course required for and limited to first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies students only.

This course, required for and limited to those beginning work towards the Ph. D. in English this fall, serves to introduce students to graduate study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 521. History of Literary Theory.

Section 001 Doing Things With Theory.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course proposes that we should try to have an account of what we hope to "do" with theory even as we begin to learn theory. We will examine an array of theory styles with a guiding question in mind: what ideas about personal and social action are announced or implied there? This program bears on our work as a group and on the individual work of each student.

The group will work to develop a common sense of the breaking points in debates over some key theory concepts, such as agency, practice and ideology. In so doing, the course will cover many of the bases treated in most theory introductions acquainting students with an array of problems, schools and vocabularies at hand in current literary study. Indeed, we will study a number of "schools" cultural studies, new historicism, pragmatism, neoformalism, normativity theory, democratic theory and the questions that tend to define schools agency, the literary, sociality, and the relation of examples to general claims, to name a few. But our efforts will not be directed principally at rendering any comprehensive survey. Instead, the readings are ordered to facilitate our thinking about profoundly differing accounts of what, if anything, theory is able to "do." Some likely authors: Foucault, Habermas, Bourdieu, Appiah, Gallagher and Greenblatt, Fish, Nussbaum.

Students will be encouraged to cultivate a keener awareness of their specific concerns, locating those concerns within the terms provided by current theoretical conversations. Through discussions at once theoretical and meta-theoretical, our sessions aim to bring participants to clear-eyed and sophisticated understandings of where and how theory matters in the work they hope to accomplish as scholars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 529. Topics in Drama.

Section 001 British Drama Since 1956.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar will focus its attention on playwrights and theater companies involved in restructuring the traditions of the English stage for the second half of the twentieth century and into our own time. While we will devote much class time to the consideration of works by John Osborne, Arnold Welker, Edward Bond, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, David Hare, David Storey, Caryl Churchill, Stephen Poliakoff, Sarah Daniels, Pam Gems, and Hanif Kureishi, we will also consider such topics as: 1) the play of Britain; 2) the angry young men; 3) the influence of Brecht and Beckett; 4) the rise of national theater companies; 5) regional drama; 6) feminist playwrighting; 7) the play for the "other" England; 8) fringe theater; and 9) popular West End drama (Ayckbourn). Students should prepare for this seminar by familiarizing themselves with the social and cultural history of contemporary Britain (see in particular Alan Seinfeld).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 535. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine in considerable detail a number of recent and significant volumes of contemporary poetry, mainly but not exclusively American, and several key books of criticism and theory bearing upon the subject. "Contemporary" here means 1960 to the present, though much of the reading will be from the last decade. An anthology will provide a range of styles and modes, and the Collected Poems of Robert Hayden will serve us as a model for studying how a poet's themes and techniques evolve throughout a career. Each student will deliver one oral report, as well as write one short paper and one long paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 541. Literature of the Medieval Period.

Section 001 Medieval Romance.

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

I won't even attempt to define the protean genre or mode of romance, the major narrative form of the later Middle Ages and arguably dominant still today because it is so concerned with quests and the negotiations of home and away, sameness and difference. We'll read primarily medieval romances, a goodly number of them Arthurian. We'll start with the medieval origins of romance as the imaginative self-portrait of the 12th-century aristocracy (Chre'tien de Troyes, Marie de France); continue with a variety of Middle English romances (Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, some Chaucer, and many lesser- known texts like Sir Degarè, Amis and Amiloun, Sir Launfal, and Athelston); then to selections from the later Arthurian revivals of Malory (Morte D'Arthur) and Spenser (Faerie Queene). If there's time and interest we'll end with some contemporary versions of romance (e.g., the quest narratives of science fiction; the fantasies of eros and gender in Harlequin romances). I'm especially interested in exploring the relationship of romances to their social contexts; constructions of gender, love, and subjectivity; imagined otherworlds; and generally how romances form a kind of "inner history" of their societies, representing the aspirations, anxieties, and negotiations of the people who wrote and read or listened to them. We'll attend particularly to the ways in which literary works resolve, negotiate, or suppress conflicts of dearly-held values: does love foster reconciliation to one's social group? or is it profoundly antisocial? can one temper the raw violence of knightly prowess and competitive assertiveness with civilized courtly refinement? how can one negotiate the often conflicting demands of belonging to a family (or a friendship, a marriage, an aristocratic coterie, a kingdom maybe even a nation) and differentiating oneself from it or within it? We'll learn to read the logic of character construction as well as the logic of narrative sequence and causation in these romances; both differ from their counterparts in realistic fiction in ways that can teach us better to read (and read through) any kind of narrative. We will devote some attention to genre theory. Works in Old French will be read in translation; those in English in the original language. This is intended as an introductory course; I do not assume prior knowledge of either romance or Middle English language, and we will read the texts in editions (and at a pace) designed for accessibility. I can't think of a historical period in which a practical and theoretical understanding of how to read romance would not be useful. The emphasis in the course will be on reading more than writing, but there will be two essays (short to medium in length) and several brief oral presentations (most relatively informal).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 569. Writing Workshop in Creative Non-Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas L Lynch

Prerequisites: This course is open to MFA students and students in other Graduate programs on campus. Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a seminar for graduate students who want to write nonfiction that is creative, moving, intellectually exciting, provocative, beautiful, and deeply engaging. (We might not succeed, but we can try.) We will be reading a great deal of published nonfiction, trying to see how masters of the essay, article and nonfiction book use the forms, styles and structures of fiction and poetry (and other genres) to handle "true" material. Our subjects will come partly from remembering our own experiences, but also from reading books, talking to other people, exploring new places and conducting various types of experiments and inquiries. Students will be allowed leeway in shaping the seminar to explore subjects that interest them; some will want to approach the course as critics and scholars, others as essayists, others as literary journalists, still others a writers of poetic meditations. Everyone will be held to the same high standards of literary form and style and rational, humanistic thought. Each participant will write three original pieces of nonfiction, some of which will be critiqued in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 570. Research in Composition.

Research In Composition. Meets with Education 621.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Composition studies continue to experience dynamic growth in the academy, and it is fascinating to watch the ways in which it gets "disciplined" as the field takes root in English departments across the country. One consequence of the dynamic yet disciplined growth of composition studies is the proliferation of introductions to the field (just look at the number of comp studies anthologies published recently). Early in the semester we will consider some of the many possibilities for an "Intro to Comp Studies" course, but then we will focus on one approach an approach which assumes rhetoric as central to what we do (or what we can do) in our writing classrooms. Many rhetorical theorists throughout its 2000-year history hold rhetorical training as essential for a life of active citizenship. What is "rhetoric," and why has its study been held in such high esteem? Why is its study currently marginalized in higher education, and what is its place in contemporary composition studies? How can rhetorical theory inform what we do as writing teachers: how might it shape course content? help us deal with issues of class, race, and gender in the classroom? guide our pedagogical practices? inform our classroom exercises, assignments, and textbook choices? assist us in our methods of evaluation? and, of course, where might rhetorical theory be inadequate from a compositionist's perspective? The reading list hasn't been finalized, but you can expect to read rhetorical theory that is particularly relevant to composition studies from 4th Century B.C.E. right up to the 21st Century C.E. Course requirements will include active class participation, short writing exercises, an oral presentation, and a longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 583. Theory of Film.

Section 001 Hitchcock in Feminist Film. Meets with Film-Video 600.001.

Instructor(s): Studlar

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 600.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 001 How To Be Gay: The Graduate Version.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will take up in greater detail a number of issues addressed by my undergraduate course, "How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation" (English 317.001: see the undergraduate course description for more information). The purpose of taking up these issues at the graduate level is to address their theoretical implications directly, and to pursue the complex pedagogical issues raised by the actual teaching of the course itself.

Within cultural studies, and queer studies more particularly, psychoanalysis remains the privileged method of thinking about the internal dynamics of human subjectivity. Theories of taste, though not entirely lacking, are comparatively underdeveloped. While I do not imagine that it is possible to escape psychoanalytic theory altogether some psychoanalytic concepts, such as identification and desire, provide the very basis on which the undergraduate course as a whole is designed my aim is to explore alternative methods of analyzing both individual and collective subjectivity. In particular, I am interested in studying concrete social practices of individuals and groups for what they can tell us about subject-formation and subjectivity, and using the insights produced by such studies to generate new theories. Instead of deducing the significance of a particular relationship between subject and object from the doctrines provided by an already-established critical theory, I hope to promote a more inductive approach that seeks to generate original hypotheses about identity and culture from a close reading and analysis of specific social practices. In particular, I hope to build a new understanding of gay identity less on a revamped theory of gay subjectivity, on revised accounts of what gay men are or how gay subjectivity is structured, than on a carefully attuned understanding of how gay subjectivity works as a social practice. Rather than theorize the nature of gay male subjectivity in order to define gayness or to explain why gay men are the way they are, I propose to derive some understanding of what it means to be gay from studying the objects that gay men like and that function for them as vehicles of personal and collective identification.

The seminar will try to tackle a series of theoretical questions that are rarely addressed in contemporary cultural studies. What can we learn about the identity of individuals or social groups from studying their practices and identifications? How do we study the shared tastes of social groups, and how can a study of those tastes help us to define or to understand better the identity that constitutes the group? How can this social and concrete approach to identity produce new ways of analyzing subjectivity that are inductively constituted and do not simply derive from or depend on the established theories of psychoanalysis? Can the close reading of cultural objects generate a non- psychoanalytic knowledge of the self?

If the process of gay initiation that the course attempts to study consists in the sharing, circulation, and examination of certain cultural materials, then any course that surveys and examines some of those materials will necessarily be a course that itself participates in the process it studies. The undergraduate course provides an opportunity to test out whether, as the course description states, there are in fact "a number of classically 'gay' works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, all gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay." In addition, part of the purpose of the seminar is to broaden the topic of the undergraduate course to include social identities other than (homo)sexual ones and to examine the relations between social identity and cultural identification as they inform, or might inform, the study of collective subjectivity more generally.

All members of the seminar will be expected to take the undergraduate version of "How to be Gay": to go to all the classes, do all the reading and viewing, and participate in class discussion. (They will not be expected to do the undergraduate writing assignments, unless they find them to be a useful exercise.) The seminar will be a weekly, three-hour supplement to the undergraduate class, with additional assigned reading. The seminar will therefore entail a significant commitment of time: the undergraduate course meets for three hours a week, plus an additional three-hour screening and discussion one evening a week; the three-hour graduate seminar will be in addition to that. However, the seminar will require much less reading and research than a normal graduate seminar, and will encourage participants to undertake independent, original investigations into identity, culture, and subjectivity.

This seminar will take up in greater detail a number of issues addressed by my undergraduate course, "How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation" (English 317.001: see the undergraduate course description for more information). The purpose of taking up these issues at the graduate level is to address their theoretical implications directly, and to pursue the complex pedagogical issues raised by the actual teaching of the course itself.

Within cultural studies, and queer studies more particularly, psychoanalysis remains the privileged method of thinking about the internal dynamics of human subjectivity. Theories of taste, though not entirely lacking, are comparatively underdeveloped. While I do not imagine that it is possible to escape psychoanalytic theory altogether some psychoanalytic concepts, such as identification and desire, provide the very basis on which the undergraduate course as a whole is designed my aim is to explore alternative methods of analyzing both individual and collective subjectivity. In particular, I am interested in studying concrete social practices of individuals and groups for what they can tell us about subject-formation and subjectivity, and using the insights produced by such studies to generate new theories. Instead of deducing the significance of a particular relationship between subject and object from the doctrines provided by an already-established critical theory, I hope to promote a more inductive approach that seeks to generate original hypotheses about identity and culture from a close reading and analysis of specific social practices. In particular, I hope to build a new understanding of gay identity less on a revamped theory of gay subjectivity, on revised accounts of what gay men are or how gay subjectivity is structured, than on a carefully attuned understanding of how gay subjectivity works as a social practice. Rather than theorize the nature of gay male subjectivity in order to define gayness or to explain why gay men are the way they are, I propose to derive some understanding of what it means to be gay from studying the objects that gay men like and that function for them as vehicles of personal and collective identification.

The seminar will try to tackle a series of theoretical questions that are rarely addressed in contemporary cultural studies. What can we learn about the identity of individuals or social groups from studying their practices and identifications? How do we study the shared tastes of social groups, and how can a study of those tastes help us to define or to understand better the identity that constitutes the group? How can this social and concrete approach to identity produce new ways of analyzing subjectivity that are inductively constituted and do not simply derive from or depend on the established theories of psychoanalysis? Can the close reading of cultural objects generate a non- psychoanalytic knowledge of the self?

If the process of gay initiation that the course attempts to study consists in the sharing, circulation, and examination of certain cultural materials, then any course that surveys and examines some of those materials will necessarily be a course that itself participates in the process it studies. The undergraduate course provides an opportunity to test out whether, as the course description states, there are in fact "a number of classically 'gay' works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, all gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay." In addition, part of the purpose of the seminar is to broaden the topic of the undergraduate course to include social identities other than (homo)sexual ones and to examine the relations between social identity and cultural identification as they inform, or might inform, the study of collective subjectivity more generally.

All members of the seminar will be expected to take the undergraduate version of "How to be Gay": to go to all the classes, do all the reading and viewing, and participate in class discussion. (They will not be expected to do the undergraduate writing assignments, unless they find them to be a useful exercise.) The seminar will be a weekly, three-hour supplement to the undergraduate class, with additional assigned reading. The seminar will therefore entail a significant commitment of time: the undergraduate course meets for three hours a week, plus an additional three-hour screening and discussion one evening a week; the three-hour graduate seminar will be in addition to that. However, the seminar will require much less reading and research than a normal graduate seminar, and will encourage participants to undertake independent, original investigations into identity, culture, and subjectivity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 642. Topics in the Renaissance.

Section 001 Early Modern Drama and Culture: Genre, Gender, History

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read a wide range of Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists and explore some of the more compelling approaches to the early modern stage that have emerged in recent years. We will also be asking some questions of our own. In what ways are these plays exploring the contradictions, disjunctions, or faultlines of their culture? What are the politics of popular genres like the revenge play? What can we say about stage practices like cross-dressing, rich and multivalent onstage but not a cultural issue or practice offstage, in society at large? What kinds of indirection does this kind of theater employ as it explores contested or orthodox notions of gender, dramatic genre, political and religious histories or controversies? Throughout the term, close attention to the dramatic text, possibilities of staging, and issues of performance will be combined with more theoretical concerns that arise from our own inquiries. Authors to be studied will include at least some of the following: Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Cary, Webster, Middleton, Dekker, and Ford. Books will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 695. Pedagogy: Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson, Andrea Kelly Henderson

Prerequisites: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. Students." Graduate standing. (3). This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies gradaute students.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This two-semester course is designed to give you guidance, advice and support as you begin your teaching career. During the first semester, we will address issues relevant to the job of teaching assistant: how to organize discussions, how to negotiate your own and your students' relations with the lectures and the professor, grading, strategies for managing office hours and individual consultations, and so on. The second semester will be devoted to ongoing support, and to helping you prepare to teach your own course in the fall: how to pick a theme, design a syllabus, pace assignments, manage assessments, and so on. One of the primary aims of the course is to provide you with a space to discuss anxieties and achievements, but we will also follow a structured program designed to focus on specific aspects of work in the classroom. In addition, we will make regular visits to your classrooms so that we can give you specific feedback on your own strengths and weaknesses. We won't be able to take all the stress out of teaching, but we will emphasize its pleasures as well as its pains. The course will meet regularly for the first four weeks of the fall semester and then every other week thereafter. In the winter semester, we will meet five times. You enroll in the course for 3 credits only during the fall term.

This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 821. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 Anti-Foundationalisms: Subjectivity/Writing/Power

Instructor(s): Anne C Hermann

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will offer participants the opportunity to engage with several strands of post-structuralist theory as a way to understand theoretical assumptions underlying scholarly enterprises such as cultural studies. Theorists to be considered are Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Michel Foucault, in dialogue with Roland Barthes, a less systemic thinker engaged with similar problematics. In each case we will begin with a contextual overview, read essays discussing key terms such as unconscious, writing, discourse, as well as selections from central works, including The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, Of Grammatology and The Archeaology of Knowledge. In addition, we will engage with more recent responses to these theoretical endeavors by writers such as Judith Butler, Hortense Spillers, Gayatri Spivak, Lee Edelman and Slavoj Zizek, in terms of ongoing influences on the "historical turn," understandings of race and gender, and engagement with popular culture, as well as changing nationalisms. Questions to be addressed are: What does it mean for these theories to share an anti-foundationalism? What is the relationship between post-structuralism, deconstruction, postmodernism and post-colonialism? What are the implications of the critique of the subject, the "wandering of meaning" and power as disciplinary, for the production of historical knowledges?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 822. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 Literature And Psychoanalysis: Objects Lost And Found

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class requires and assumes no background in psychoanalytic theory; it is designed to reopen the question of the relationship between the literary and psychoanalysis in a variety of ways. There will be a particular emphasis on the extraordinarily rich and highly literary body of thinking in the tradition of British object-relations theory. The semester will begin with some texts by Freud along side some writings by some of the best readers of Freud, which will seek to reveal the ways in which psychoanalytic writing explores what it means to theorize experience in the first place. We will use this as a jumping-off point for exploring psychoanalytic concepts of interest and use to students of literature and of reading: the status of the aesthetic object, objecthood, intersubjectivity, transference and countertransference, identification, introjection, narcissism, and affect. Texts will include writings by Freud, Ferenzci, Samuel Weber, Laplance, Andre Green, Abraham and Torok, Melanie Klein, D.W. Winnicott, W.R. Bion, Christopher Bollas and others. All students of whatever field are welcome; students of late 19th and 20th century culture interested in exploring the cultural context of the development of psychoanalysis (especially its development in England) may be particularly interested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 002 Modern Wars, Modern Memory

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"I was just thinking of a good title for an art book. From Bismark to Hitler," Stein writes in Paris France. It is a title that would have made terrible sense to anyone reading Stein's account of her adopted country, first published in England in the summer of 1940, as Paris fell to the Germans and the French signed an armistice agreement with their conquerors. In this same book, Stein notes wryly that "there is a great deal of war-time in history." Her grim observation certainly captures the truth for anyone living during the first half of this century, and it will be the business of this course to investigate what it means to live and write in a time of war. It is a truism worth careful investigation that the First World War profoundly affected modern art and modern cultures. We will not only seek to discover more fully just what this general assertion means; we will also study the writings around other conflicts central to the modern period: particularly the Spanish Civil War and the Second World War, but also the Russian revolution and civil war. Students will have the opportunity to focus on writing from other conflicts occurring during the period covered by this course.

Michael Herr, toward the end of Dispatches, about the war in Viet Nam, tells us that war cannot ever be left behind: "Those who remember the past are condemned to repeat it too, that's a little history joke." Clearly, to bring war and writing together is to consider the ways wars are remembered and forgotten by those who have lived through them. Readings in this course will often revolve around issues of memory and memorialization, and we will be working throughout the term with a selection of the continually growing body of work concerning social and individual memory. One of the more general aims of this course is to investigate the uses and abuses of words, disciplines, and categories of understanding that permeate the field of modernist studies today: history and historicist understandings of culture; the vexed category of the political; popular culture and the status of the documentary; memory and trauma studies.

Focusing primarily on the world wars, we will study a wide range of writings: not only poetry and memoirs of combatants and those whose lives were directly affected by combat, but also poetry and fiction that addresses the condition of living in a time of war. Students will have opportunities to help shape our reading list, but authors that we are likely to study will include Robert Graves, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Mary Borden, Vera Brittain, Gertrude Stein, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Storm Jameson, Rebecca West, Christa Wolf, Margaret Bourke-White. Students who are interested in focusing on visual materials (photographs, paintings, film) will have opportunities to do so. Twentieth-century wars have also been media events, and the nature of reporting and propaganda might be a subject for students' projects. A number of recent histories of the world wars have attempted to address more fully the experience of those wars for peoples other than the citizens of the United States and the most militarily powerful European combatants. There will be room for students to choose work in these areas that have traditionally been less fully studied by Anglo-American history as well. Course requirements will include in-class reports; a presentation of work in progress; and a final, extensive seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Smith Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Porter Gaylord Shreve

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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