College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 9:17 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in French
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for French.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in French this week go to What's New This Week.

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FRENCH 438 / ROMLING 456 / EDCURINS 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alain E Martinossi (alainm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: French 235, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/french/438/001.nsf

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods of teaching secondary level foreign languages. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. Throughout the course, student will actively and reflectively practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the School of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to:

  • become familiar with the 5 goals of the standards for foreign language learning
  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching
  • participate in professional electronic discussions in order to further explore issues discussed in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 461 / MEMS 444. Reading of Old French Texts.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 The Romance of the Rose and Thirteenth-Century Paris.

Instructor(s): Peggy S Mccracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course takes as its focus the thirteenth-century allegorical romance, Le roman de la rose. We'll read this romance slowly, thinking about it as both a work of literature and as a cultural document. We'll ask what allegory does and how it does it; why allegory is useful for describing love and how allegory might complicate the representation of love in unexpected and potentially subversive ways. We'll also situate this romance in the context of thirteenth-century Paris. We'll do research to figure out what Paris looked like when the romance was written, what kind of debates (in the University of Paris, in the church, in the monarchy) may be represented in the text, and we'll study the production of manuscripts during this period. Toward the end of the term we'll read the late medieval debates about Le roman de la rose that were initiated by Christine de Pisan and that focused on language, gender, and violence.

This course is taught in French. It is open to advanced undergraduates and to graduate students. Graduate students will be responsible for supplementary critical readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 528 / ROMLING 528 / SPANISH 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gallego De Blibeche

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Credits: (3 in the half-term) .

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 601. Proseminar in French.

Section 001 Tutorial in Old French

Instructor(s): Peggy Mccracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers instruction in the reading of Old French. Balance between grammatical introduction/review and reading practice to be determined according to interests and needs of students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 655. Studies in 19th Century French Literature.

Section 001 Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Modernity

Instructor(s): William Paulson

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although offered (at least as of now) under the nineteenth- century rubric, this course's chronological center of gravity will be in the eighteenth century. Our central task will be to work at reading texts of that era mainly those of Madame de Graffigny, Diderot, and Rousseau as instances in the construction of that elusive and possibly fictitious entity known as modernity. We'll be asking the questions, "what is/was (the) Enlightenment?" "what were some of the major cross-currents and tensions within it?" In the latter part of the course, we will turn to the prolongations and transformations of Enlightenment problematics in writings by Chateaubriand, Madame de Stael, Michelet, and Baudelaire. Throughout the course, we will also look at recent critical and theoretical writing that takes up the questions of modernity, its avatars, and its possible nonexistence. Course meetings will emphasize the reading of specific selected texts, with the aim of developing students' abilities to read works of this era and work with their intellectual problematics.

There will be a final paper. Other student work to be determined once the size of the class is known.

Tentative reading list (18th and 19th centuries):

  • Graffigny, Lettres d'une péruvienne
  • Rousseau, Discours sur les sciences et les arts, Discours sur l'origine de l'inégalité, Essai sur l'origine des langues (extrait)
  • Diderot, Le Neveu de Rameau, autres textes courts ou extraits
  • Chateaubriand, Atala et/ou René
  • Stal, De la littérature ("Discours préliminaire")
  • Michelet, Introduction à l'histoire universelle
  • Baudelaire, divers écrits sur l'art, poêmes choisis
Critical/theoretical readings to be announced in next version of course description.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 660. Topics and Themes in French Literature.

Section 001 Reading Proust.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will be entirely devoted to the reading and discussion of Proust's "A la recherche du temps perdu." This close focus will allow us to explore Proust's own reading techniques, as well as various interpretive strategies that have been applied to Proust's work. In the first instance we'll consider Proust's treatment of sources (e.g., Chateaubriand's novels, Nerval's "Sylvie," Balzac's, "La Fille aux yeux d'or," Baudelaire's poetry, Ruskin's writings on architecture), and the ways in which they influenced his narrative techniques. For the second, we'll consider various critical approaches to Proust's work: narrative and semiotic analysis, psychoanalysis, gender studies, and cultural critique.

The discussion of these various "reading" methods is meant to highlight, as well as question some characteristic Proustian "topoi," such as: "mise en abyme" and self-reflexivity, the use of photographic and musical analogies, the role of memory, and the narrator's ambiguous attitude towards such important issues as: sexuality, cultural identity, and political engagement. Evaluation will be based on two oral presentations and a final essay. Reading or re-reading Proust's "Recherche" over the summer is highly recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 993 / ROMLING 993 / SPANISH 993 / ITALIAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Gallego De Blibeche

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 993.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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This page was created at 9:17 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


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