College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 9:17 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in German
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for German.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in German this week go to What's New This Week.

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GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beck

Prerequisites: German 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 444 / MEMS 443. Medieval German Literature in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Of Knights And Lovers. Great Books of the German Middle Ages.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the great courtly epics of the German Middle Ages (1170-1230). We will read long excerpts from the Song of the Nibelungs, Erec, Tristan and Isolde as well as Parsifal books that tell spellbinding stories of ladies and knights, monsters and warriors. Authors such as Hartmann of Aue, Gottfried of Strasbourg, and Wolfram of Eschenbach revolutionized the art of storytelling. Their plots revolve around warfare and knightly honor, friendship and love, romanticism and adultery, individual growth and courtly etiquette.

No prior exposure to medieval literature and history is required. Background readings as well as short lectures in class will introduce students to major themes such as feudalism, crusades, manuscript culture, or medieval authorship. This is a reading- and writing-intensive course. Class meetings are based on discussions of the assigned readings. Several essays and class participation will make up students' grades.

No German required. All texts and classroom discussions are in English.

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GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Austria and The Nazi Past.

Instructor(s): Anton Pelinka

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course intends to analyze the specific Austrian position towards National Socialism. Despite being together with Germany the "motherland" of the Nazi movement, Austria as an independent and sovereign state became victim to Hitler's expansionism. After 1945, Austria successfully played down the role which many Austrians played prominently within the Nazi regime.

In the 1980s, Kurt Waldheim's election to the Austrian presidency provoked international attention. In the 1990s, Joerg Haider's and his Freedom Party's rise created another incentive to rethink Austria's willingness to deal with the past.

The course will focus especially on the following aspects:
- The background and the function of Austrian Anti-Semitism
- The tradition of Pan-Germanism in Austria
- The way Austria has been and still is dealing with the past
- A comparison between Austria and Germany with respect to "Vergangenheitsbewaeltigung"
- Inter-generational patterns of attitudes and behavior

Basic Literature:

Pauley, Bruce: From Prejduice to Persecution. A History of Austrian Anti-Semitism. Chapel Hill NC (University of North Carolina) 1992.

Pelinka, Anton: Austria. Out of the Shadow of the Past. Boulder CO (Westview) 1998.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 New Women, New Novels.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the history of German women's writing from the late 19th century to the present. The very notion of "women's literature" has always implied a specific gender politics which has often confined women to the realm of popular, low- and middle-brow culture. We will examine different strategies by which authors such as Gabriele Reuter, Else Lasker-Schüler, Frieda von Bülow, Vicki Baum, Irmgard Keun, and Ingeborg Bachmann challenged that conception of "women's literature". To explore the role of women's literature in articulating the "New Woman" we will closely analyze the texts themselves in cultural and sociopolitical contexts such as the emergence of the women's movement, German nationalism, colonialism, orientalism, and class politics. We will also look at their reception by feminists, other literary critics, and the growing (female) reading public.

Class discussions, presentations, and papers will be in German. Readings will include German and English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hubert Rast (hubrast@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall Term of their senior year, preferably but not necessarily as early as Winter Term of their sophomore year. German 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall Term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 German Ethnicities in Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/german/499/001.nsf

Who is "German" and to what extent do 'German ethnicities' exist today? Who defines what "belongs' and what is 'foreign'? In this course we will discuss contemporary literature and film in which various forms of 'Germanness' are explored: the work of African-German, Jewish- German, Turkish-German, Romani-German, and Japanese-German filmmakers and writers will be at the center of our interest. We will watch some of the promising new films of German cinema, listen to hiphop and rap, and read short literary texts which deal with the interests of various ethnic communities. This course will provide background information for gaining an understanding of the multiplicity of cultures in Germany today. Students will be required to discuss films and texts in German, give oral presentations and write short essays based on the weekly readings.

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GERMAN 501 / ENGLISH 501. Old English.

Section 001 Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 509. Gothic: Introduction to Germanic Linguistics.

Section 001 (Credits?)

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While providing an introduction to the Gothic language, whose literary artifacts stem from the 4th century AD, this course also serves as an introduction to comparative Germanic phonology, morphology, and syntax. We shall examine the emergence of Gothic from its Germanic roots; note the areas in which its development diverges from the developments of the other Germanic dialects; survey the cultural institutions that supported early literary efforts; trace the history of the Goths from their appearance on the pages of history, through their migrations from their homeland in Scandinavia to the shores of the Black Sea, and their eventual dispersion and demise as a people. Participants will learn to analyze and interpret Gothic sentences, read Gothic manuscripts, and recite verses with near-native fluency. They will gain hands-on experience with synthetic passivity, the morphology of the middle nascent periphrasis, inceptivity and inchoativity.

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GERMAN 517 / LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabor

Prerequisites: Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to provide the theoretical and practical foundations for the teaching of German as a foreign language in schools and colleges. The course will combine regular reading assignments with frequent class observations, and the preparation of sample lessons in order to generate a fruitful interplay between theory and practice. Course requirements include regular reading assignments, regular class observations, several short presentations, quizzes, and a final paper or project.

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GERMAN 540. Introduction to German Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

German Studies, defined by its heterogeneity rather than by any single theoretical approach or unified object of exploration, has been the subject of animated debate over the last decade. This introductory course pursues three distinct but related goals. First, we will study some of the most important theoretical foundations of German and Cultural Studies: Nietzsche's concept of the death of God and its vast implications; psychoanalytic accounts of the economies of desire; and the Frankfurt School's explorations of ideology and culture. We will then trace these themes and their incarnations and modifications in various fields, such as literary and historical studies, studies in gender and sexuality, social and political thought, visual arts, and popular culture, seeking to gain an overview of the seminal work done in German Studies over the last decades. Third, we will take stock of the critical debate surrounding critical studies and ideally construct a preliminary working model of German Studies at the University of Michigan. Requirements: several article-length readings a week; two seminar papers of about ten pages each. One of these papers should sketch a specific project in German Studies, the other should be devoted to a critical theoretical exploration of German Studies itself. The last session of the term will be organized as a round-table discussion of that second set of papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Marx, Weber, and German Political Sociology.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will analyze the writings of Karl Marx, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, Robert Michels, Werner Sombart and Ferdinand Toennies. In particular, we will look at the political sociology of these writers and investigate how their view of society and the state shaped their analyses of modernity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 901. Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For degree candidates who have completed course requirements and who need supplementary work. Under supervision of graduate committee.

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GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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GERMAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Hartmut M Rastalsky

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

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GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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This page was created at 9:17 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


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