College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History


This page was created at 9:19 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for History.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in History this week go to What's New This Week.

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HISTORY 403. Problems in Roman History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Roman Imperialism&Frontier Soc

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a study of Roman colonialism during the late Republic and early empire, ca. 100 B.C. to ca. 100 A.D. Topics to be discussed will include the conquest of the provinces, the survival of local cultures in the provinces, the imposition of a Latin culture in the western provinces, the promotion of Greek culture in the eastern provinces, the clash between Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean societies, and the interactions along the frontiers between Romans and barbarians. Readings will consist of translations of ancient texts, including Sallust's Jugurthine War, Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars, and Tacitus' Agricola and Germania, as well as modern scholarship about ancient imperialism and frontier societies. All classes will be discussions of the reading material. Requirements include three papers based on the readings and discussions, and participation in all discussions.
No prerequisites; everyone welcome.
C.R. Whittaker, Frontiers of the Roman Empire. A Social and Economic Study (1994),
Sallust, The Jugurthine War / Conspiracy of Caitline Penguin pb.
Caesar, The Conquest of Gaul Penguin pb.
Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars Penguin pb.
Tacitus, The Annals of Imperial Rome Penguin pb.
Tacitus, The Agricola and the Germania Penguin pb.

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HISTORY 412 / MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hughes

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

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HISTORY 425. French Revolution.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/425/001.nsf

The French consider the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; others outside France have called this moment the birthplace of modern political culture and looked to it as the model for all subsequent revolutions. In this course we will study the events of the Revolution and their political, social, and cultural import, as well as their legacies both within France and beyond. Particular attention will be paid to the experience of revolution and the different ways in which the revolution was experienced and made sense of by women and men, Parisians and provincials, revolutionaries and opponents of the Revolution. Readings will include primary documents and recent work by historians. Class format includes both lecture and discussion.
Required readings include the following:
1. Laura Mason and Tracey Rizzo; The French Revolution: A Document Collection; Houghton-Mifflin, 1999; ISBN 0-669-41780-7
2. Gary Kates; The French Revolution: Recent Debates & New Controversies; Routledge, 1997; ISBN 0-415-14490-6
3. Simon Schama; Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution; Vintage Books, 1990 (Reprint ed. of Knopf orig); ISBN 0-679-72610-1
All three are paperback.

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HISTORY 427. Magic, Religion, and Science in Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Hist. 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the "first three minutes" of the modern mental universe in actuality, about three centuries of historical time (1500-1800). It concentrates on how the "big bang" of the Protestant Reformation blasted apart a world view and a culture that had slowly developed over a thousand years. The explosive force of that strangely contingent event, renewed by subsequent eruptions of religious conflict and civil war, divided the English people culturally as never before. Magic declined, miracles and malevolent witches disappeared, the prestige of the ancient sciences of astrology and alchemy eroded. New and powerful philosophical ideas about human understanding and physical reality flourished; scientific explanations for a vast array of celestial, earthly, and mental phenomena proliferated and were embraced by laypersons as the basis of a new faith, the faith in (someone else's) reason. The world view that dominates modern English (and Western) culture emerged from almost three hundred years of charged conflict and began rapidly to evolve into contemporary scientism. And yet the shattering effect of the events that powered cultural change also made it impossible for secularization and rational religion fully to triumph. The hold of rational religion and secularism on the minds of the majority of ordinary men and women remained less complete than on the minds of the educated, governing classes. The result finally was a cultural and social realignment. The elite fashioned a "superculture" that is dominated by religious rationalism and scientistic faith; the dissenting sects, the lower classes and marginalized groups have sustained and created subcultures that are characterized by supernatural wonder and sudden infusions of spiritual and emotional energy. Much has changed since 1800 when this process was more or less completed, but these cultural and class divisions have not disappeared, and they have complicated ethnic relations as well as politics. In sum, this course is finally a meditation on how England lost its medieval mind and found its modern, divided sensibility. Principal readings will include all or part of Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars; Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic; James Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England, 1550-1800; Peter French, John Dee: The Life of a Renaissance Magus; and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution. A course pack of articles and original sources will also be required. Students will be asked to write three short (five page) papers on the readings for class; an in-class, midterm examination and a two-hour final examination.

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HISTORY 430. History of the Balkans from the Sixth Century to 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course treats the region now comprising Bulgaria, ex-Yugoslavia, Greece, and Albania from the Slavic migrations (6th and 7th century) to roughly 1878. It treats demographic changes, the creation of medieval states (Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia), Christianization, Balkan heresies, relations with Byzantium, the Ottoman conquest, Balkans under Ottoman rule, and the 19th century independence movements.

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HISTORY 442 / AAPTIS 461. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 461.001.

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HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers: (1) the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere; (2) Japan's coerced entry into the world market; (3) the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia; (4) the rise of social protest and mass culture; (5) political reaction and militarism; (6) defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation; (7) postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony; (8) myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society." Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings, discussion panels, in-class midterm, final paper.

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HISTORY 466. The United States, 1901-1933.

U.S. History

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Thomas Guglielmo (guglielm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how different Americans and their institutions came to terms with industrial capitalism and the changes, crises, and inequalities it, in part, produced. The course will focus most extensively on the developing relations between the state and society, between the federal government and various social groups workers and capitalists, women and men, immigrants and native-born Americans, the "white" and "colored" "races", colonizers and colonized who, through their struggles for order, justice, and dignity, made modern America. Course requirements include a research paper, several short response papers, and a take-home midterm and final. History 466 is a lecture/discussion class. Undergraduates electing this course must register for Section 001 and one discussion section.

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 Mid-Century America Through Film: Power and Persuasion on the Big Screen.

Instructor(s): Robert O Self

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course approaches film as one of the most important and influential cultural media of mid-century America, a powerful and persuasive entertainment space in which Americans told, watched, and invented stories about themselves and others. As such, film is an extraordinary, though not uncomplicated or transparent, historical source. How did American films of mid-century (1935-1955) deal with the major social and cultural issues of these decades? Gender and sexual politics? Race and pluralism? Class and wealth? War and neo-imperialism? The anxiety of modernity? How did films' narrative structure appear to resolve dilemmas over complex social questions? Did films teach Americans to think and understand themselves in conventional ways, or could viewers read against their messages? These are the kinds of questions we will ask as we explore mid-century American culture and society through film. This course is above all a critical study of society, culture, and media, an exploration of the complicated historical contexts in which images and stories are produced, circulated, and debated.

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 American Indians & Film. (3 Credits). Meets With American Culture 496.002

Instructor(s): Liza E Black

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 496.002.

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 003 Early American Cultural History to 1865.

Instructor(s): Jay Cook

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines major themes and problems in U.S. cultural history through the Civil War. Possible topics include: images of European colonization and conquest; the refinement of American architecture, material culture, and manners; African-American culture and resistance under slavery; the development of American museums from Peale to Barnum; the blackface minstrel show and racialization; Emancipation Day balls, parades, and festivals in the antebellum North; urban sketch writing in the new metropolis; the fiction of Poe, Melville, Delany, and Stowe; and the Civil War in American visual culture. Course requirements include a midterm paper, a comprehensive final exam, regular quizzes, and above all, active participation in our discussions.
Required readings are as follows and are in paperback.
-Richard Bushman, "The Refinement of America", (Vintage)
-Graham and Shane White, "Stylin," (Cornell U. Press)
-David Roediger, "The Wages of Whitness," Revised Edition, 1999 (Verso)
-Mary Ryan, "Women in Public," (Johns Hopkins Press)
-George G. Foster, "New York by Gaslight," (University of California)
-James W. Cook, "The Arts of Deception," (Harvard University Press)
-Harriet Beecher Stowe, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," (Penguin Classics)
-Course Reader (instructions for purchase will be announced in class)

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 005 Modern American Presidency. Meets with History 774.001.

Instructor(s): Douglas Raymond Brinkley

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the evolution of the office of the American presidency from Theodore Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Through a multitude of sources, students will study the changing role of presidents through the past hundred years. Of particular importance will be the subjects of Party Politics, the invention of radio, the advent of television, the changing role of the media, and questions of privacy. Questions to consider will be, how much should the public know about the private lives of its leaders? How have these changes influenced the way presidents handle their job? How do public expectations of the president differ from what they were a century ago? How have the powers of the president, in relation to Congress, shifted?

Students will be required to read biographies of such Commanders-in-Chief as Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Ronald Reagan. Differing concepts of leadership will be examined, from Woodrow Wilson's diplomacy and the U.S. entry into World War I to FDR's New Deal and America's role in the Second World War. The aim of the course is to have students come to a better understanding of political leadership and how it is employed in the highest office in the land.

This course will be cross-listed as an undergraduate course in History and a graduate course in the Ford School. Undergraduates will meet once a week with a GSI; graduate students will meet at least every other week with the instructor.

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HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines Burma, now known as Myanmar, and adjacent areas of western mainland Southeast Asia from earliest times until the present day. Although Burma itself, a country roughly the size of Texas with a population of some 45,000,000 people, is hardly a major world power, the patterns of precolonial history, colonialism, military rule, ethnic conflict, and the current struggle for economic development are broadly representative of much of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. In this sense Burma offers a rewarding case study of a "Third World" society, and provides answers to such basic questions as: Why did Asia and Europe develop differently in the premodern era? What evidence do we find of economic dynamism outside Europe? Why is democracy fragile and unsuccessful in much of Asia? What role do non-Christian religions play in promoting trauma? Beyond the value that mmay derive from consideration of these sort of general problems, Burma's unique Buddihist civilization is extraordinarily intriguing and worthy of study in its own right.

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HISTORY 473 / KOREAN 473 / ASIAN 473. Modern Korea.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry H Em

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Korean 473.001.

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HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America: mestizaje and Nation. Meets With Cultural Anthropology 458.003 & LACS 400.001

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.003.

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HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Colonial Latin America.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Life on Homefront 2nd WW.

Instructor(s): Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the social, cultural, and political lives of people who lived in the warring countries of Europe in the late 1930s and 1940s. War is waged not just by soldiers and on battlefields, and increasingly it is being realized how crucial the home front is to the battle front although it is often portrayed as a secondary sphere of activity. Especially in the Second World War, with the massive bombing of populated cities, the occupation of villages and hamlets by foreign soldiers, not to mention the Nazi program to exterminate the Jews, the line separating the battlefield from the sanctity of the home was thin at best. The course will focus in particular on Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. Our comparative focus will allow for an exploration of how different political regimes represented themselves to their citizens, and how those regimes dealt with issues of gender, class, and ethnic/racial difference.

Limit of 30 and keep a waitlist.

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HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 002 Nazi Rule and German Society.

Instructor(s): Ulricke Weckel

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the ways in which the Nazi-party first gained millions of followers among German citizens, and how it subsequently came to power, established a dictatorship and organized the deprivation and terror against the politically or "racially" unwanted. The primary focus of this course will be on the ways in which specific groups responded to Nazi ideology and policy. For example, could the NSDAP win the working class? What fascinated young people who joined the youth movement? Were women really reduced to the role of housewives and bearers of "arian" children? In which ways did the everyday life of German jews change before they were deported? Through consideration of these various milieus it is possible to examine the relevance of categories as race, class, gender, and generation for the development of stances of complicity or resistance. Building upon this primary material, we will look at the steps taken by the so-called "Third Reich" towards war and the extermination of the European jews. Prominent debates on such topics as the motives of the perpetrators or the part that Hitler played in the radicalization of persecution will be read and discussed in this context.
Required Readings:
Detlef J. K. Peukert, Inside Nazi-Germany: Conformity, Opposition, and Racism in Everyday Life, (New Haven/London: Yale University Press, 1987)
Ian Kershaw, The Nazi Dictatorship: Problems and Perspectives of Interpretation
Michael R. Marrus, The Holocaust in History
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men: Reserve Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland
Anna Seghers, The Seventh Cross

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HISTORY 491 / ECON 491. The History of the American Economy.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/econ/491/001.nsf

See Economics 491.001.

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HISTORY 543 / AAPTIS 464. Perso-Islamic Civilization in the Eastern Caliphate and India, 900-1350.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 464.001.

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HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America: mestizaje and Nation. Meets With Cultural Anthropology 458.003 & History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites: AAS 202 recommended. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.003.

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HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 Historical Perspectives on Japanese Architecture and Space. (1 credit). Meets with Asian Studies 491.001. Mini-course (5 weeks) 10/15, 10/17, 10/22, 10/24, 10/29, 10/31, 11/5, 11/7, 11/12, 11/14. (Drop/Add deadline=October 19).

Instructor(s): Jordan Sand

Prerequisites: (1-2).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Asian Studies 491.001.

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HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Social Protest in Japan. Meets with History 392.001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores histories of social conflict, protest, and rebellion in early-modern and modern Japan through a combination of primary sources and secondary literature as well as select pieces on theoretical and methodological issues. Our focus on peasant protests, urban uprisings, "world-renewal" movements, and restorationist activisim of the Tokugawa period; on the Popular Rights Movement, labor and tenancy struggles, revolutionary activism (both Left and Right), and citizens' and environmental movements in post-Meiji period, will raise issues about the nature and transformation of social relations and political culture in Japan from the 17th century to the present. In an endeavor to situate these movements in their social and spatial settings, we will experiment with two sets of coordinates (1) urban and rural; (2) local, national and transnational.

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HISTORY 600 / SI 580. Introduction to Archival Administration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Yakel (yakel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/si/580/001.nsf

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

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HISTORY 603 / ANTHRCUL 640. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Section 001 Radical Geography: Gender, Class And Globalization.

Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 640.001.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 001 Introduction To History: Theories And Practices

Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu), Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. History 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

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HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 002 Introduction To History: Theories And Practices.

Instructor(s): Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu), Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. History 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

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HISTORY 620. Studies in Modern Medicine and Health.

Section 001 Studies in Modern Medicine

Instructor(s): Pernick

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, disease and the healing professions deeply influenced almost every aspect of social and cultural history. Social and intellectual changes, in turn, helped shape the changing history of disease and medicine. Like race and sex, disease can be seen as a category of difference whose boundaries have been framed and made visible by the intersection of changes in biology, society, and culture.
This course combines an intensive introduction to the theoretical and monographic literature in the field, with a smaller-scale introduction to research methods usually reserved for seminar courses. Students will write two review papers based on the secondary literature, as well as several short assignments based on primary source research. Students who wish to emphasize the research component may elect to take the course for seminar credit.
The examples we will study as a group will be drawn from American history, from initial native-colonial contacts to the crisis of AIDS. But comparisons will be drawn with non-American history and non-American topics will be available for individual papers.
The course is not solely for those who wish to prepare an exam field or write a dissertation in medical history, but for anyone who wants to integrate the material and the cultural dimensions of human health in any historical area. Students who have taken History 620 with Prof. Hunt are welcome to take this version as well.

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HISTORY 621 / WOMENSTD 621. Studies in Women's History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upper classmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for graduate students who plan to research and teach in the field of U.S. women's history or would like to incorporate women's history scholarship and methodology into their interdisciplinary research and undergraduate teaching. It also devotes some attention to feminist pedagogy. Most weeks, readings include primary texts and key interpretations based on these documents. Remaining class time is devoted to feminist theory, teaching strategies and goals, recent computer-based technologies, and course design. The first class, for example, introduces students to feminist visual culture theory and practice through an examination of changing European and Euro-American representations of "America," three scholarly readings of these images, and a theoretical essay analyzing visual productions of meaning. In the following week, we analyze the surviving documents of a seventeenth-century Virginia court case dealing with gender ambiguity along with several interpretations of this event offered by historians, including a web-generated discussion of the case's usefulness for teaching gender theory to the uninitiated. And so on. The course begins by placing U.S. women's history in the context of European colonization and an emerging Atlantic world and concludes by drawing connections between late nineteenth-century gender constructions and U.S. empire-building in the Pacific. Throughout, our goal will be to assess the most recent trends in the field and how we can best convey their significance in undergraduate classrooms. The class meets each week for two regular discussion hours, with several additional hours of technology training to be arranged.

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HISTORY 622 / ECON 663. European Economic History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Economics 401 and 402. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 663.001.

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HISTORY 625. Studies in Balkan History.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 626. Studies in Byzantine History.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 629 / CAAS 629. Studies in African History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about African history and historiography. Although the focus will be on Africa, Africanist and African history writings, a comparative perspective with other regions and disciplines will be considered. Each session will be devoted to a book or an important article. Discussions will focus on sources, methods, approaches, epistemology and identification of research themes.
Required readings:
1. Anderson, David & Rathbone Richard (eds.), 2000, Africa's Urban Past, London, Heinemann
2. Barber, Karen (ed.), Readings in the Texts of African Popular Culture, Indiana University Press, 1997
3. Pier M. Larson, History and Memory in the Age of Enslavement: Becoming Merina in Highland Madagascar, 1770-1822, Portsmouth, Heinemann/James Currey, 2000
4. Emmanuel Akyeampong, Drink, Power, and Cultural Change: A Social History of Alcohol in Ghana, c. 1800 to Recent Times, Portsmouth, Heinemann/James Currey 1994
5. Jonathan Glassman, Feasts and Riot: Revelry, Rebellion, and Popular Consciousness on the Swahili Coast 1856-1888, Portsmouth, Heinemann/James Currey, 1995
6. Arletta J. Norval, Deconstructing Apartheid Discourse, London, Verso, 1996
7. Robert M. Baum, Shrines of the Slave Trade: Diola Religion and Society in Precolonial Senegambia, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999.

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HISTORY 633. Studies in Roman History I.

Section 001 Native Cult in Roman World

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Around the ancient Mediterranean Roman rule was widespread and comprehensive. Latin became the dominant language of administration everywhere, and in the West the dominant language of culture. Greek remained the language of high culture in the East. But throughout the Roman world, both around the Mediterranean and in frontier regions, other local cultures survived. This course will examine the interactions between local cultures, languages, economies, lifestyles, art, and religions, and the imposition of Roman hegemony. Readings will include modern scholarship on Roman society, comparative studies on colonialism, and ancient texts. Requirements include participation in class discussions, oral presentations, short papers, and a long paper. Students' interests will help shape the topics for discussion. Questions or comments? Please contact Prof. Van Dam at rvandam@umich.edu

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HISTORY 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 001 Boundaries & Conversions

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The theme that will unite our readings and discussion of early modern western and southern European history is that of boundaries in every sense of the word. After the fragmentation of Christendom and the complication of the category "Christian" in western Europe, the people who built states rulers, bureaucrats, financiers, colonizers, religious leaders, cartographers and a multitude of others worked to accrete, convert, define or describe their realms and the peoples they contained. We will think about how communities were reshaped as political, physical and social boundaries were redefined regendered, architecturally redesigned, territorially defined, confessionalized. Core readings will be selected from classic and recent regional and local studies of early modern England, France, Spain and the German and Italian states. This course focuses on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will be particularly interested in religion, in the relationship of the "center" and the periphery, and in particular uses of architectural and spatial construction in the development of the states and monarchies. Course requirements: in addition to core readings and full participation in the discussion each week, students are expected to lead the discussion of one class session and to submit three papers: a short analytic paper (5-7pp.) on a primary source of your choice (due by the sixth week of class, to be submitted with translation, if not in English, and a preliminary bibliography); a thematic essay (10-12 pp.) which treats at least three of the core readings; and a final project (15-20 pp.) which revises and builds on the primary source paper submitted earlier. Class size permitting, students will also make short oral presentations on their final projects.

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HISTORY 651. Studies in Modern French History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the major themes and debates in the literature on contemporary France. We will give critical attention to a number of themes that have long shaped the literature on modern France the paradox of chronic political upheaval in a context of apparently stable social structures, for example, or the vexed issue of France's economic "backwardness" and the particularities of industrial development in this (until recently) rural society. We will also consider some of the more recently popular themes the social and political mobilization of economically and socially disadvantaged groups (peasants, women, workers, disgruntled strata of the middle classes), the ways in which various strands of the revolutionary tradition have shaped French politics on the right and on the left. Finally, we will give comparative attention to the different historiographical traditions that have organized research on the two sides of the Atlantic, of which the very different understandings of gender and women's history, or the very different approaches to colonial and post-colonial history, form but two of the most salient examples.

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HISTORY 652. Studies in East European History.

Section 001 East-Central Europe in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl65201.html

This course will focus on East-Central Europe in the 19th and early 20th centuries, with particular attention to Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, and Jewish history. The themes to be discussed include nationalism, socialism and the labor movement, industrialization (or the lack thereof), and the diverse social and cultural transformations that marked the region's "modernization." Readings (approximately one book per week) will be in English, though students with a knowledge of one or more of the local languages will be given alternative assignments. Grading will be based on class participation, and on two 10-15 page essays.

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HISTORY 654. Studies in Modern Russian History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate colloquium will cover a range of topics in late Imperial Russian history through a close reading and discussion of recent secondary monographs and important journal articles. An interdisciplinary approach will allow exploration of a number of issues in political, social, economic, intellectual, and cultural areas, and an exploration of various theoretical and methodological approaches. All readings will be in English. Three shorter papers (or one shorter and one longer paper) will be required.

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HISTORY 668 / CHIN 668. Studies in Early Chinese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a preseminar in premodern Chinese history before 1800. The main focus of the course is on the examination of the development of the field, the current state of research, and the various methodological approaches in the studies of premodern Chinese history. The topics include the following: 1. Approaches to Chinese historical analysis
2. The origins of Chinese civilization and state
3. Ancient China in transition: feudalism, social-economic-political changes, and the age of philosophers
4. Early Imperial China: the Ch'in-Han Empires
5. Middle Imperial China
6. Later Imperial China: the Sung and the Yuan
7. Late Imperial China: Ming and early Ch'ing
Each year, four or five of these topics are selected for study through weekly readings and discussions. The readings are selected from English language materials only. Course requirements: a term paper and short reports.

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HISTORY 680. Studies in Early American History I.

Section 001 Atlantic History

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

By analyzing historical writing in the last forty years, this course explores some of the debates over the role played by the Revolution in the widening Atlantic world between 1776 and 1812. In particular, it considers the extent to which the Revolution was part of a much wider movement in the West marked by the advance of libertarian and egalitarian idealism and the growth of fiscally-based militarism. European participation in the war, by men such as Paine, Kosciusko and Rochembeau, is highlighted. English attitudes to the war, as they were evidenced by politicians, diplomats, merchants, and the press, are examined. Similarly, European intellectuals' perception and utilization of the events and writings of the Revolution as well as European statesmen's adoption and adaption of its models are explored through a study of the works of French philosophers, German academics, Irish revolutionaries and Italian legists. Other countries considered are Canada, the British West and East Indies, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, and Russia.

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HISTORY 683. Studies in the United States History: 1815-1865.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of the historiography of the United States in the period from 1815-1865.

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HISTORY 685 / AMCULT 685. Studies in American Intellectual History.

Section 001 Darwin Marx&James:Theory/Polit

Instructor(s): Richard Candida Smith

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will introduce students to central issues in the field of the United States intellectual history since the 1860s. Intellectual history is the study of what people believed they knew, how they theorized their relations to each other and to the world, and what the effects of such conceptualizations were on social action. The course this term will focus on three nineteenth-century theorists fundamental to the development of modern biology, psychology, social science and politics; C Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, and William James. Texts selected include primary and secondary sources and trace debates arising from new theories of evolution, social relations, and psychology. Assigned readings will address some of the international contexts of U.S. intellectual life, as well as the role of scientific theory in conceptualizing race, gender, religion, and other differential attributes.

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HISTORY 686 / AMCULT 686. Studies in American Cultural History.

Section 001 Popular & Mass Culture

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will address issues critical to the use of popular culture materials in historical interpretation: technology and the nature of mediation; the formation of canons, genres, and audiences; modes of textual interpretation and the linkages between text and social relations; the relations between "high," "low," "mass," "folk," and "popular"; the uses of pop culture by consumer audiences; and the production of ideological formations speaking to issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, nationhood, and modernity. We will attempt to balance readings of important classic texts and emerging literature with interpretative work using primary sources from both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

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HISTORY 687 / CAAS 687. Studies in Black History.

Section 001 Intro to the Black Atlantic

Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will have the option of taking this course either as a studies course or as a seminar. The studies course (History/CAAS 687) will survey key issues in African American history through the end of the Civil War, including the forced migration of Africans to this hemisphere, slavery and emancipation, and cultural, social, and institutional development in black communities north and south. Students in the studies course will also spend time identifying and analyzing a variety of key primary sources from this period of African American history. There will be a couple of short writing assignments, and students will prepare a term essay (approximately 25 pp.) dealing with a historiographical issue of their own choosing. Students electing the seminar option will spend the academic term preparing original research papers related in some way to African history. The number of required meetings will be minimal, though seminar students will be welcome to participate in meetings of the studies course. In addition to the research paper, each seminar student will be required to present her/his topic to the entire group at some scheduled meeting of the studies course beginning at midterm. PLEASE NOTE that all students must complete the requirements designated for their option by the end of the winter term. No incompletes or "Y"s will be given. A tentative list of texts is available in the department graduate office.

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HISTORY 690 / PUBPOL 690. Race and Ethnicity in International Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Connelly (mattconn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 690.001.

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HISTORY 690 / PUBPOL 690. Race and Ethnicity in International Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Connelly

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 690.001.

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HISTORY 695 / CAAS 695. Studies in the Comparison of Historical Cultures.

Section 001 Empires States&Polit Imagination

Instructor(s): Frederick Cooper (fcooper@umich.edu) , Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In much of social science as well as in popular conceptions, the nation-state is regarded as the central unit of historical activity. Yet the idea of a "nation" was, even during most of the last two centuries, only one way of representing political affiliation. An analysis of empire both in the present and the past opens up possibilities for examining a wider range of social linkages, imaginations, and behaviors. This course will focus on the comparative study of empires, and upon the variety of ways in which empire-states have established and constrained claims to rights, belonging, and power. The study of empire expands our debates over rights, citizenship, economic regulation, and accountability without letting them fall into a seeming gap between the nationstate and the global. "Empires, States, and Political Imagination" will be a year-long graduate course. The fall academic term, required for all who want to continue in the winter, will focus on reading and discussion; the winter academic term will be primarily devoted to research and writing of a seminar paper. The first term will interweave two sorts of materials: comparative and theoretical analysis of empire-states and their relationships with each other, and case studies of particular empires. Students will write a book review, a comparative review essay, and a proposal for a research paper. This proposal will become the starting point for the second semester. The major project of the winter term seminar will be the writing of a research paper. Students who wish to take this course should plan to enroll for both fall and winter terms. Questions about the course should be addressed to either Jane Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu) or Fred Cooper (fcooper@umich.edu).
Students should attend the first class to receive an override to register into the course.
Required readings are as follows.
Books for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State. St.:
1. Karen Barkey and Mark von Hagen, eds. After Empire: Multiethnic Societies and Nation-Building (Boulder: Westview, 1997).
2. Daniel R. Brower and Edward J. Lazzerini, eds. Russia's Orient: Imperial Borderlands and Peoples, 1700-1917 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1997.
3. Alice Conklin, A Mission to Civilize (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997).
4. Frederick Cooper and Ann Stoler, eds. Tensions of Empire (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996).
5. Frederick Cooper, Decolonization and African Society: The Labor Question in French and British Africa (Cambridge, U.K.:Cambridge University Press, 1996).
6. Mark Elliott, The Manchu Way (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001).
Coursepack at Dollar Bill's, to be picked up at Ulrich's.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 Racial Geographies. Meets with American Culture 699.003.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 699.003.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 003 Culture and the Politics Of Sentiment. Meets with Anthropology 558.004

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 558.004.

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HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

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HISTORY 770. Seminar in Twentieth Century American History.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Terrence J Mcdonald

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 801. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class.

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HISTORY 803. Reading for the General Examination.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.. (1-3). This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U." (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTORY 812. Seminar on History Pedagogy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Second-year graduate standing or higher. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of History 812 is to prepare students for the rigors of running a college-level history class. The course deals with practical "how-to" issues about course design, grading, lecturing, moderating discussions, etc., and also explores some of the broader issues and controversies of the pedagogical side of the historical profession.

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HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course for students working on special research projects in Asian history.

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HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

Instructor(s): Canning (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

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HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

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HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, which may be taken for one to eight credits, is an election used for dissertation work by a student who has not yet been admitted to candidacy; therefore, it may be taken in the term of the preliminary examination. If the student advanced to candidacy during the term in which prelims are taken, the registrar will automatically change this registration to eight credits of History 995.

This course requires permission of a faculty member and an override; please contact the Graduate Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTORY 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Hecht (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

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HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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