College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 9:19 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in History of Art
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art.

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HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 221 or 222. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Etruscans are among the earliest identifiable peoples of the region of modern Tuscany and surrounding Italian provinces (Latium, Umbria, Emilia-Romagna), and their civilization has left numerous traces still evident today. Apart from the rich archaeological sites and museums that house works of Etruscan art, certain persistent architectural features and construction techniques common to the region have roots in the Etruscan past. This course will follow the developments of Etruscan civilization from the 7th to the 1st century B.C. and consider their influence on later periods and people in Italy. Works of art, archaeological artifacts, and architectural remains form the basis for discussing Etruscan artistic developments, socioeconomic and political conditions, religious and burial practices, gender issues, and historical events. Within each period of Etruscan history comparisons among the various Etruscan territories will highlight the individual characteristics of each locale and illustrate the influences of one upon another. Slide-illustrated lectures and class discussions will be complimented by field trips to the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology and, if possible, the Toledo Museum of Art and the Detroit Institute of Arts. There will be a midterm and a final examination consisting of slide attributions and essay questions. Short writing assignments will focus on Etruscan objects in the Kelsey Museum. Students enrolled for graduate credit must also write a substantial research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Class readings may include selections from Brendel, Etruscan Art; Pallottino, The Etruscan; Bonfante, Etruscan Life and Afterlife; Scullard, The Etruscan Cities and Rome; and a variety of monographs and journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 435 / CLARCH 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John G Pedley

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 435.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 471. Investigations of Recent Art.

Section 001 Conceptual Issues In Recent Art (1990-Present).

Instructor(s): Joseph C Grigely (jgrigely@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 272. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the period since Robert Smithson's death in 1973, the movement of the contemporary art scene (as defined by a subset of galleries in NYC, LA, and western Europe, and by surveys such as Documenta, and the Whitney and Venice Biennials) might be characterized by the presence a certain self-consciousness of both aesthetic history and contemporary critical practices. This self-consciouness has, as a consequence, meant that historical and conceptual issues have affected both the making and the exhibition of art in both public and private institutions even to the point where cultural institutions themselves become media for artists, such as in Fred Wilson's reconfigured galleries, Andrea Fraser's pseudo-docent tours, and Christian Boltanski's 'discovered' archives.

In this course we will explore conceptual issues like these, emphasizing, in particular, work produced during the past ten years. Many of the questions posed in the class will not have immediate or straight forward answers, but instead will function in such a way as to expose tensions, aporias, and issues that seem particularly salient at this moment in cultural history. These issues will include social interaction as a performance text (Rirkrit Tiravanija, Sophie Calle, Andrea Fraser), the 'problem' of 'Public' art (Curtis Mitchell, John Ahearn, Richard Serra), body criticism in relation to the editing of bodies (Damien Hirst, Dinos & Jake Chapman, Orlan), painting as a conceptual practice (Gerhard Richter, Sue Williams, Bob Ross), and the recent controversy generated by the publication of Dave Hickey's manifesto on aesthetics in the 1990s, The Invisible Dragon: Four Essays on Beauty. Our discussions will also explore conceptual issues relating to exhibitions: contemporary exhibition prosthetics (wall labels, press releases, statements, flowers), the rhetoric of exhibition catalogues, virtual exhibitions, and how table manners and chain saw safety relate to what the curator Jeffrey Deitch calls "the sociology of the art world."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 499 / AMCULT 499. The Arts in American Life.

Section 001 Detroit, A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American history; and permission of instructor. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "modern Times' was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century," played an important symbolic role for modern aratists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place.

This class will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880s to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined tehnology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

The class will function as a seminar that combines lectures with discussion of challenging readings on aspects of twentieth century culture that have been present in Detroit, and group reports based on research in local archives and libraries. Several field trips and guest lectures will be scheduled.

Open to all juniors, seniors, and graduate students with a prerequisite of any one prior course in History of Art OR American Culture OR American History AND permission to enroll. Please e-mail the instructor requesting permission to enroll. This course is part of the Detroit 300 Theme Semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 531 / CLARCH 531 / ANTHRCUL 587. Aegean Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 221 or 222. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 531.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 555. Renaissance Architecture in Italy.

Section 001 Meets With Architecture 518.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101 or 102. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/arch/518/001.nsf

A survey of selected Italian buildings from Brunelleschi to Palladio, this course endeavors to explain the formal nature of Renaissance, classical architecture and to relate it to the historical context of the city-state and the papacy. The theory and practice of Alberti, Bramante, and Michelangelo are explored in some detail. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by a textbook and varied shorter reading assignments. The requirements for the course, for UG and grad students, are: midterm exam/final exam/term paper/participation in discussions based on assigned readings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 562. Baroque Sculpture in Italy and Spain.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with introductory lectures on 16th-century sculptural traditions and on the stirrings of a new way of seeing and working, the course will pass to an intensive investigation of the art of Gianlorenzo Bernini. Bernini's sculpture will be studied both for what it reveals of the master's artistic genius and of the changing sociopolitical/religious climate in Papal Rome. The influence of Bernini's vision and the alternative to the Berninian manner that of Baroque Classicism will then be discussed. This will be followed by a unit on the extraordinary sculpture of 17th-Century Spain. The course will end with suggestions as to the constants that is, the peculiarly Baroque features within so much astonishing diversity. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 582. Later Islamic Architecture: 1500-Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 285. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings and discussions of a wide range of material render this course as much a study of palatine architecture and urban development as an exploration of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the three great Muslim imperial states in the Early Modern period (16th-17th centuries). In a network of framing intentions and significations, the palace and its representational plentitude from architecture and landscaping to ceremonials and their accoutrements, from spectacle and spectatorship to gendered zones of access will be analyzed as carefully orchestrated manifestations of the cultural production of urbanized empires. We shall seek to trace the ways in which each imperial state formulated its distinctive rhetoric of sovereignty through experiencing the city and its palaces. Throughout, we shall weave together the "canonical" with the marginal in an effort to help us nuance the cohesive elements that bind these cultures together, highlighting commonalities of the iconography of power within eastern Islamdom and beyond. Active class participation, papers, presentations and museum visits are required. (PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of instructor

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the History of Art faculty members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Section 011 Object, Body and Installation in later 20th Century Sculpture. (1 credit). Meets with History of Art 399.011. Meets 09/06 to 09/27. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s): Alex Potts

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the new conceptions of sculpture which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s with the breakdown of a modernist painterly aesthetic and the shift to creating objects and installations. It focuses on three dimensional work by artists such as Carl Andre, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, Louise Bourgeois and Rachel Whiteread. Their "specific objects" (Donald Judd) take a number of different forms, ranging from Minimalist abstractions to biomorphic things evoking body parts, to environmental creations. We shall discuss the particular importance given to the siting and staging of these objects and explore the new kinds of physical and psychological interaction set up between viewer and work. We shall also focus on issues thrown up as a consequence of the work engaging the viewer at a more immediately physical, bodily level than painting or two dimensional imagery. Also important is how this increasingly self-conscious staging of sculpture brought out a tension between a viewer's one to one communion with a work, and the situating of her or his experience in the public arena of a gallery. Course requirements include short papers from students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, please contact Larry in Student Services 647-5602 for enrollmentpermission

HISTART 603. Independent Study in Asian Art.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 615. First Year Graduate Seminar.

Section 001 Methodology.

Instructor(s): Matthew Nicholas Biro (mbiro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to introduce students to new methods of interpretation currently in use in the discipline of art history. After a brief survey of the some of the major methodologies and practices which have traditionally informed the study of visual art (formalism, iconography/iconology, and Marxism), students will examine five methodologies which form part of the "new art history": the social history of art, phenomenology, structuralism/poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and multiculturalism. As we shall see, these newer art historical methodologies do not replace the more traditional modes of art historical analysis, but rather supplement them augmenting canonical art history's focus on form, style, iconography, and social context with concerns having to do with the construction of both selfhood and otherness, the transmission and slippage of meaning, and the interrelationships of art and politics. Seminar requirements include weekly abstracts summarizing the readings, a short research paper, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 646. Problems in Medieval Art.

Section 001 Carolingian Art.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar focuses on the cultural efflorescence associated with the name of Charlemagne (ca. 742-814) first emperor of the revived Holy Roman Empire in northern Europe. We will examine early medieval court culture from a variety of perspectives, focusing on Charlemagne's court at Aachen, comparing it to earlier, contemporary, succeeding, and imagined courts. Charlemagne's varied cultural initiatives will be central to our study, but we will also follow the lives of figures in his immediate entourage, studying the debates in which they engaged (e.g., image theory, educational and liturgical reform) and also the poetry and scholarship they produced and the architectural and artistic works they commissioned. Finally we will study responses to Charlemagne's memory in the ninth and succeeding centuries, considering the emperor's place in the European historical imagination. Students will acquire a thoroughgoing knowledge of major monuments (architecture, manuscript illumination, ars sacra) and become familiar with a large and important scholarly literature. Working knowledge of German is desirable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 677. Studies in American Art.

Section 001 The Art of Thomas Eakins (1844-1916).

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Thomas Eakins' detailed paintings continue to impress modern viewers with their scrutinizing vision, psychological probing, palpable physicality, and emotional gravity, and these works have inspired some of the most challenging recent writing in art history. This seminar will take a close look at the stages of Eakins' career and historiography, but will also devote considerable attention to current interpretative work. The class will thus function as a seminar in comparative methodology and as an introduction to current theoretical debates in art history. Among the topics to be explored are:

  • changing attitudes toward vision, representation, gender, and the body;
  • 19th century masculinity;
  • Eakins' training in French academic traditions, his use of drawing, photography, and sculpture;
  • his relationship with Walt Whitman and with homosocial and homoerotic discourse in the nineteenth century;
  • the social, intellectual, and professional world of Gilded Age Philadelphia;
  • late nineteenth-century science and medicine;
  • "interiority" and the nature of portraiture;
  • the critical revival of Eakins by Lewis Mumford and other writers in the 1930's.

Readings will include:

  • Michael Fried on the sublime;
  • Barthes and Foucault on authorship;
  • David Lubin's Lacanian interpretation of The Agnew Clinic (and the feminist critique of that work);
  • Marcia Pointon on the nude;
  • "psychological" portraiture in fiction by Henry James and/or Charlotte Perkins Gilman, as well as recent studies of "the invention of the psychological;"
  • a case for Eakins' work as pragmatist philosophy;
  • neo-Marxist analyses of power; and
  • Elizabeth Johns' social history of modern life in Eakins' Philadelphia.

Students will make brief presentations and prepare a short paper on one of the readings, lead a discussion, then present a 20-minute seminar report and prepare a long paper based on original research. Some of these presentations will be made during a three day field trip to see the major Eakins retrospective at the Philadelphia Museum of Art which will include a joint session with graduate students from Philadelphia-area art history programs.

Because of its concentrated focus on one artist and on methodological issues, this seminar will provide students from outside the discipline of art history with a good introduction to the interpretation of visual images. Students in history, literature, and American culture are encouraged to participate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 694. Special Studies in the Art of China.

Section 001 Paradise and Hell in Art, Religion, and Literature.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines the diverse human imagination of the afterlife by focusing on the visual representation and textual description of paradise and hell in religious and non-religious traditions. In particular, the connections between the earthly world and the fantastic realms will be studied in historical context. Although the instructor's primary interest is in the Buddhist tradition, participants of the seminar are encouraged to use relevant cases in their own fields to develop strategies of research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 720 / WOMENSTD 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts.

Section 001 Theories and Representations of the Gendered Body. Meets with History of Art 772.001 and Women's Studies 698.004.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course treats selected trends and changes in the analysis of visual representation of gender and sexuality. It opens with an historiographic survey of developments in the field, then concentrates on key case studies and themes. It does not focus on women as artists, but instead considers the construction of gender roles and sexual identities in the visual realm. Our two core foci will be the cultural history and imagery of the phallus in relation to psychoanalytic and current theory by writers such as Butler and Silverman, and the visual representation of same-sex relations between women. Other potential topics include the hypermasculine hero, the reclining female "nude", female viewers finding pleasure in "the erotic", the homoerotic body. The course is intended as a guide for students in a variety of disciplines who wish to investigate theories and complexities of visual analysis by considering the lively problematics of gender and sexuality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 752. Studies in Fifteenth Century Italian Art.

Section 001 The Sacred Image and the Renaissance.

Instructor(s): Megan Holmes

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will respond to a recent call for the reassessment of the role of religion in Italian society and culture c.1300-1600. We will question the secularized version of the Italian Renaissance which insists upon a significant shift during the period "from cult images to the cult of images." We will study important miracle-working images and the cults that they inspired, the decoration of religious sanctuaries, and the interplay between religious observance in the public and private spheres. Different categories of religious representation will be defined and explored. Covering a broad chronological span that includes the Counter Reformation, we will look for both continuity and change in religious representational practices and theory, and in the institutional regulation of images and their use in religious devotion. We will also be interested in how the sacred image responded to pressures posed by new cultural developments like the interest in classical antiquity, more overtly aesthetic attitudes toward the visual arts, collecting practices, and an increase in secular subjects in civic, court, and domestic art. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken, with an emphasis on the study of material culture, period texts and documents, social history, religious ritual, theories of representation, and historiography.

Weekly readings will be assigned and students will be expected to participate in class discussions. Some class meetings will involve close readings of primary texts, secondary literature, and theoretical writings, while others will be information-gathering sessions devoted to specific sanctuaries and relevant topics. Toward the end of the seminar each student will be asked to present a paper that must then be revised for final submission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 771. Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century.

Section 001 Image, Ideology, Opposition: Form and Signification in Parisian Art and Culture 1848-1894 .

Instructor(s): Howard Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with the development of strategies for interpretive readings of pictures within historical context. The context is Paris during the second half of the nineteenth century; the visual materials include painting, caricature, political cartoons, photography, and publicity posters: the strategies are derived from art history, narrative theory, ideology studies (recent and traditional), and a broad range of methods that loosely coalesce under the rubric of "cultural history." The course is designed to asses recent theorizations of modernism in relationship to a wide range of Parisian cultural phenomena from the somewhat narrow interests of professional artists, writers, and critics, to the broader consequences of industrialization, urban modernism, and the rise of mass culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 001 Theories and Representations of the Gendered Body. Meets with History of Art 720.001 and Women's Studies 698.004.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 720.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 773. Problems in Art of the Twentieth Century.

Section 001 Art History And Textual Criticism.

Instructor(s): Joseph C Grigely (jgrigely@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the transmission of cultural texts, and the ways in which individual works of art undergo change as part of the process of being disseminated in culture. The underlying premise is that the uniqueness of the unique art object is constantly undergoing continuous and discontinuous transience as it ages, is altered by conservators, and as it is resituated or reterritorialized in different publications and exhibition sites. How does the manifestation of change effect the ways in which art is 'read' and 'meaning' is constructed?

In the first half of the academic term we will survey a variety of examples of textual change in twentieth-century art and architecture, as well as in twentieth-century representations of art from previous periods. We will then engage recent critical paradigms including textual criticism (McGann, Bowers), New Historical Criticism (Greenblatt, LaCapra), and what might be called New Art History (Preziosi, Moxey) to examine critical approaches to transience, and the problems inherent to documenting it. Specific subjects will include reproduction and refabrication, restoration and conservation, labels and captions, and both microtemporal and macrotemporal conceptions of temporal change. In the second half of the academic term, seminar participants will present papers that treat either pragmatic or theoretical implications of textual change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 890 / CLARCH 890. Problems in Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 890.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 993. GSI Training.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Bassett Ho

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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