College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Public Policy Studies


This page was created at 9:19 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Public Policy Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PUBPOL

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Public Policy Studies.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Public Policy Studies this week go to What's New This Week.

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PUBPOL 529 / POLSCI 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math. 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers descriptive statistics, probability theory, probability distributions (normal, binomial, Poisson, exponential), sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. It also includes an introduction to experimental design. The emphasis in the course is on preparing competent users and consumers of basic statistics. Some attention is paid to the mathematical underpinnings of statistical theory so that students will be prepared to go on to the Ford School econometrics course (PUBPOL 571). No previous course work in statistics is required, but a prior calculus course or concurrent enrollment in PUBPOL 513 is a prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PUBPOL 541 / ECON 541. International Trade Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alan V Deardorff (alandear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. This course presumes a prior knowledge of intermediate economics. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~alandear/courses/541/syllabus.html

The aim of this course is to teach you a lot about the economics and a little about the institutions of international trade and trade policy. The course is companion to SPP/Econ 542, International Finance Policy, which deals with international macroeconomic topics such as the balance of trade and balance of payments, determination of exchange rates, and international macroeconomic policies. Each course will also include the bare essentials of the other course so that if you take only one of them, you won't be lost.

The main topics of this course are two: First, the economic reasons why countries engage in international trade and why countries as a whole usually gain from that trade. And second, the wide range of policies that they nonetheless use to interfere with trade and the effects of those policies on countries and on groups within them. In addition, we will touch briefly on related topics such as international migration of labor and movement of capital, the significance of foreign direct investment and multinational corporations, and the structure and role of international institutions such as the World Trade Organization.

Prerequisite: SPP/Econ 555 or equivalent courses in intermediate microeconomics.

TEXT: The textbook for the course is Krugman, Paul R. and Maurice Obstfeld, International Economics: Theory and Policy, Fifth Edition, Addison Wesley Longman, 2000, isbn #0-321-03387-6.

There will also be a number of additional readings that will be available in course packs from Grade A Notes Copy Service, sold at the Michigan Union Bookstore. Coursepack 1 contains readings that are not available on the web, and is therefore essentially required. Coursepack 2 contains readings that are available on the web, and although the readings are required, their purchase is therefore optional and for your convenience. One copy of each course pack will be on reserve in the Foster Library.

Because of the speed with which issues evolve, readings selected in advance can never cover all of the latest developments. You are therefore especially encouraged to follow current issues of international trade policy by reading daily periodicals such as the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, or Financial Times or weekly publications such as Business Week, or The Economist. Student subscriptions to these publications are available at reduced prices. The Foster Library receives the WSJ and NYT daily.

REQUIREMENTS: Requirements for the course consist of a series of problem sets that will not be graded, four short papers that will be handed in during the term and graded, a midterm exam, and a final exam. The weights on each of these requirements in determining your grade will be as follows:
Papers 32%
Midterm Exam 28%
Final Exam 40%

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 555 / ECON 555. Microeconomics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James A Levinsohn (jamesl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course begins a two-term sequence designed to provide students with an understanding of the economic implications of public policies and with analytic tools useful in system design and policy planning. Major topics include production, costs, prices, resource allocation, governmental involvement in economic activity, and the operation of market systems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 560 / POLSCI 560. Foreign Policy and the Management of International Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude C Hays

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/spp/pubpol/560/001.nsf

This course examines both the international political system in which states pursue their foreign policy objectives and the domestic political processes that affect their foreign policy decision-making. The goal is to provide students with the background necessary to effectively analyze, develop, and implement foreign policy strategies. To this end, the course is divided into three parts. In the first part of the course, the major theoretical approaches to the study of international relations are introduced. The second part of the course focuses on foreign policy processes in the world's major economic and military powers. The final part of the course examines the institutions and policy problems that exist across several important international issue-areas including international security and economics, world health, and the environment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 573 / ECON 573. Benefit-Cost Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerwin K Charles (kcharles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 555. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students how to evaluate government programs. It covers the mechanics of benefit-cost analysis, how scarce or unemployed resources should be priced, the choice of proper time-discount rates, treatment of income distribution issues, environmental benefits, intergovernmental grants, and regulatory problems. An essential part of the course is a term project each student selects a program and does a benefit-cost evaluation of it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 585 / POLSCI 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/polsci/585/001.nsf

This course focuses on the political environment within which policy analysis takes place. In the United States, public policies are formulated and implemented in a political system of widely-shared power by participants with many different, and often conflicting, goals. To be effective, policy analysts and public managers must understand this political system. The goal of this course is to provide the student with some of the background necessary to develop strategies for dealing effectively with the political environment of policy and administration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 636 / POLSCI 636. Program Evaluation I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mohr (lmohr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Public Policy 571 or concurrent enrollment in Public Policy 633. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The central issues addressed by this course are whether and how one ought to try to establish the extent to which public programs are achieving their goals. Are the goals being attained? If not, why not? A great deal of money is actually spent to answer these questions. Is this research worthwhile? Are the results important in the policy process? A critical issue is the quality of evaluation studies that are carried out, so the bulk of the course deals with evaluation theory and methods. Students will learn how to tell whether programs of any kind are having specified impacts upon the world, which turns out to be an extremely difficult question to answer. Policies and programs in a broad range of areas are critiqued in discussion, including health, mental health, corrections, criminal justice, recreation, education, and development. Prerequisite: PUBPOL 571 (Applied Econometrics) or Corequisite: PUBPOL 633 (Applied Regression Analysis).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PUBPOL 690 / HISTORY 690. Race and Ethnicity in International Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Connelly (mattconn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/PUBPOL690_W00_Syllabus.htm

In this seminar students will relate the development of ideas about race and ethnicity to international competition and conflict, cross-border migration, and changing notions of citizenship and sovereignty. Readings include theoretical overviews and particular historical cases, including the Second World War as a race war, the influence of ethnic minorities in foreign policy, and contemporary conflicts in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. The course is intended to help students acquire theoretical tools with which to analyze race and ethnicity in the international context, to illuminate some of the origins of contemporary issues, and to consider the policy implications of historical scholarship. Requirements include occasional presentations with a written version to be circulated via e-mail beforehand and one term paper or two policy memoranda on topics approved by the instructor. A course packet is available at Dollar Bill. The following required texts are at Shaman Drum:
Brenda Gayle Plummer, Rising Wind: Black Americans and U.S. Foreign Affairs, 1935-1960
John Dower, War Without Mercy
Donald Horowitz, Ethnic Groups in Conflict
Paul Gordon Lauren, Power and Prejudice: The Politics and Diplomacy of Racial Discrimination
Anthony D. Smith, The Ethnic Origins of Nations
Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities is temporarily out-of-print, but there are five copies at the undergraduate reserve desk.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PUBPOL 735 / POLSCI 735. Telecommunications Policy.

Section 001 Managing Professional Relationships

Instructor(s): Paula Caproni

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/PUBPOL735_F01_Syllabus.htm

No Description Provided.

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PUBPOL 736 / POLSCI 736. Poverty and Inequality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca M Blank

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/courses/syllabi/PUBPOL736_F00_Syllabus.htm

This course analyzes the conditions and causes of poverty within the United States and the variety of economic, social, and political responses to poverty which have occurred in recent decades. The bewildering number of anti-poverty programs that have been tried in the last 20 years underscores the extent of disagreement about the causes of poverty, the situation of the poor, and the role of the government in encouraging income redistribution and social change. The first part of the course explores the problem of poverty, including a discussion of various causal theories about poverty and the underlying implications of these theories. The second part of the course analyzes specific problems and policy proposals, with particular attention to the most recent round of legislative reforms in anti-poverty programs since the mid-1990s.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PUBPOL 741 / ECON 586. Principles of Finance & Global Financial Markets.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dominguez

Prerequisites: SPP 555 or Econ 501; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/spp741page.html

The first half of this course will introduce the principles of finance. We will explore how financial assets are valued, the measurement and management of financial risk, and the lessons and limitations of finance theory. The second half of the course will examine institutions and current practices in (developed and emerging) financial markets. We will examine the use of derivative instruments to hedge currency and interest rate risk, the relationship between the development of financial markets and economic growth, and the financing of developing country debt. The overall course objective is to learn the theory and practice of modern global finance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PUBPOL 747 / ECON 739. Topics in International Economic Policy.

Section 001 The International Financial System: Problems and Prospects for Reform. Meets Sept. 11, 2001 Oct 16, 2001. (2 Credits). (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s): Robert M Stern (rmstern@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Public Policy 540. Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 739.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 747 / ECON 739. Topics in International Economic Policy.

Section 002 Issues in the WTO Multilateral Trade Negotiations. Meets Oct. 23 Dec. 11. (2 Credits). (Drop/Add deadline=November 5).

Instructor(s): Robert M Stern (rmstern@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Public Policy 540. Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 739.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for PUBPOL.


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