College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 9:21 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Linguistics
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LING

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Linguistics.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Linguistics this week go to What's New This Week.

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LING 440. Language Learnability.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield

Prerequisites: Ling. 314 and 315. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ling 440 is an accessible introduction to learnability theory and its interactions with various linguistic theories. The course will work mainly within the Principles and Parameters framework, surveying general concepts from formal learning theory and complexity theory together with important discussions from developmental psycholinguistics, language processing, and historical linguistics. Prerequisites: Ling 315 or instructor permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 450. Perspectives on Second Language Learning and Instruction.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistics 350.001.

Instructor(s): Helen J Morley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Ling. 350. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore past and current directions in both theoretical and practical aspects of second/foreign language learning and teaching. The course will examine a number of language learning/teaching paradigms and focus on the changing forms and functions of methodology, technique, and approach as the emphasis of language pedagogy has shifted from teacher directed, drill and pattern practice to learner focused, task based instruction. Students will have an opportunity to reflect upon and analyze their own language learning experiences and begin to critique and understand the instructional needs of varying language learning populations.

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LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Comparative Syntax: Romance. Meets with Linguistics 792.003.

Instructor(s): Acrisio Pires

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses topics in the syntax of the Romance languages, especially Portuguese, Spanish, French and Italian. As most language families, the Romance languages have common historical and typological features, although they also vary in significant respects. These similarities and differences will be studied from a generative linguistics perspective and cast in terms of the model of (universal) principles and parameters (of language variation), emphasizing the interaction between innate knowledge (or universal grammar) and the triggering experience represented by the primary linguistic data to which speakers have to be exposed in the process of acquisition of their native language. From this perspective, the course will cover (parametric) variation in functional domains, exploring connections among phenomena such as subject licensing, case and agreement, verb movement, word order and subject-verb inversion, non-finite complementation, control and clitic placement. Furthermore, this course will explore the consequences of this model for language change among dialects of Western Romance languages (Brazilian and European Portuguese, Galician and Spanish; and also French). Directed to both linguistics and Romance language majors. Pre-requisite: LING 315 or equivalent; or permission of instructor depending on other relevant background (such as knowledge of one or more Romance languages and/or courses in fields such as mathematics or computer science). Evaluation will be based on weekly readings and/or homework, a midterm and a final research paper.

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LING 512. Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrice Speeter Beddor (beddor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 313. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/ling/512/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the nature of speech sounds. One goal is to provide an overview of the type of sounds in the world's languages and to train students in the production and transcription of these (sometimes "exotic") sounds. Practice with these sounds is accomplished through native-speaker presentations, in-class exercises, and computer demonstrations. A second goal is to arrive at an understanding of the speech process, which involves transmission of an acoustic signal from a speaker to a listener, and a corresponding description of speech sounds in terms of their articulatory (speaker-based), acoustic, and perceptual (listener-based) characteristics. In achieving this goal, students are introduced to basic principles of phonetic theory through readings, lectures, and hands-on experience in the phonetics laboratory. A third goal is to investigate interactions among articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual properties and to consider their possible consequences for the structure of sound systems. These phonetic properties are viewed as imposing constraints on the notion of a "possible speech sound" and as contributing to the definition of the "possible speech sound system" for human languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 515. Generative Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 315. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Generative framework, syntactic structure is generated by a formal rule system and by applying constraints to its output. Some of these rules and constraints are hypothesized to be innate, or "unlearned" (perhaps a species specific system that, in part, makes human language acquisition, or grammar growth, possible). Other aspects of our linguistic knowledge appear "learned", i.e. determined by an interaction of human biology and particular linguistic inputs. This class introduces this so-called "Principles and Parameters" approach to the analysis of human syntactic knowledge, focusing on how the various postulated ("simple") rules and constraints interact to generate ("complex") structures, characteristic of natural language sentences (such as the one you are now reading, and understanding). Course requirements may include weekly assignments, a midterm, and a final. For undergraduates, Linguistics 315 and permission of the instructor are prerequisites. There is no prerequisite for graduate students.

Text: Haegeman, Blackwell L. Introduction to Government & Binding Theory, 2nd Edition.

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LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change. Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), and class participation (10%).

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LING 519. Discourse Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Text has become a recurrent metaphor for the way we make sense of our world. This course explores how textuality has been interpreted in various disciplines and how the analysis of texts can be useful in answering different types of questions. Students can expect to gain a basic knowledge of various ways of analyzing both spoken and written texts. The course examines a variety of topics including why the concept of text is a useful and necessary way to think about human communication; how experience is encoded differently in speaking versus writing; different methods of analyzing texts; and how the analysis of texts enables us to understand such social problems as communication in families, doctor-patient interaction, and courtroom testimony. This course follows a seminar format. A high level of student participation is expected. The course requirements include regular writing in response to course readings, homework assignments, and a final paper. Some background knowledge of linguistic concepts is important.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 532. Issues in Bilingualism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Bilingualism has been common throughout history, but in the last half century or so a number of developments such as decolonization, an increase in demand for popular education, massive population shifts through migration, and the development of global communication have served to accentuate our sense of living in a visibly and audibly multilingual modern world. A number of interesting issues can be dealt with in a course on bilingualism, all of great current relevance. Examples are acquisition of language(s) by children in bilingual families; the bilingual brain; aspects of bilingual knowledge/competence; language maintenance and language shift in migrant communities; bilingual education; multilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States; minority languages; the politics of bilingualism; attitudes to bilingualism. Students will be encouraged to work where relevant with their own languages and endeavor systematically to frame their own experience of bilingualism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 541 / CMPTRSC 595 / EECS 595. Natural Language Processing.

Section 001 Meets with Information 661.001.

Instructor(s): Dragomir Radev (radev@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. (3). CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://perun.si.umich.edu/~radev/NLP/

See Computer Science 595.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 613. Advanced Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Ling. 513. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/ling/613/001.nsf

In this course we will read and discuss selected works on issues that are of fundamental interest to phonology. We will focus on the following areas: Feature theory, Syllable theory, Metrical phonology, and Optimality theory. Regular course work includes assigned readings, participation in class discussion, and exercises. In addition, each student is expected to choose and work on a research topic, give a class presentation near the end of the course, and submit the result in a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 680. Field Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki

Prerequisites: A course in syntax and a course in phonetics/phonology. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the techniques required for field study of a language's structure, especially its phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax. Students will elicit data from a native speaker of a language unknown to them; they will record and then organize and analyze their data. They will learn how to construct preliminary hypotheses and test them, and how to write up their analyses. Students will also learn about the ethical requisites for carrying out linguistic fieldwork and for making material available to other scholars. Class sessions will be devoted in part to group elicitation of data and in part to discussions of analytic issues that arise. Students will be responsible for preparing two analyses: first, a single analysis by the entire group of all the data collected during class; and second, a term paper analyzing some particular aspect of the language not covered during class sessions, such as ethnobotanical terminology or some set of syntactic structures. Students will meet with the consultant outside of class to elicit data for their individual projects; they may work in two-person teams on the individual projects.

There will be no textbook for the course. Some readings may be assigned; others will be made available as optional readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 Language and the Gendered Self. Meets with Anthropology 675.001 and Women's Studies 698.003.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The relationship between language and gender has been a widely researched topic in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology since the early 70's, when Robin Lakoff published Language and Woman's Place. Some of the questions which researchers often consider with respect to the relationship between language and gender include the following: How do patterns of speaking and interpreting reflect, perpetuate, and create our experience of gender? How does gender interact with sexual identity, race, class, socioeconomic status, age, occupational and social/familial roles, institutional settings, and other factors? Does gender connect to linguistic change? What do controversies about sexism and other biases in language suggest about the connections between language, thought, and socially situated political struggles? In this course, we will explore these questions and integrate a variety of approaches in working toward an understanding of the relationship(s) between language and gender.

Text: Coates, Jennifer. 1998. Language and Gender: A Reader. Blackwell Course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Text Processing and Linguistic Research. Meets with Linguistics 492.002.

Instructor(s): Richmond H Thomason

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with tools and techniques for linguists who may find themselves needing to organize, search, and display linguistic corpora. The course will concentrate on structured corpora (e.g., the corpora that are constructed by field linguists in the course of their research) but is not necessarily confined to this material.

The beginning of the course will consist of a brief introduction to the UNIX operating system and a less brief introduction to the Perl programming language. We will consider the issues involved in structuring linguistic data, and the interplay between format and functionality in designing a corpus. The material will be illustrated with examples such as syntactic treebanks, online dictionaries, corpora collected for analyzing discourse, and other corpora of interest to students in the class.

The typical student in this course will be a student who has advanced knowledge of linguistics and is generally familiar with computers, who has had little or no computer science or computational linguistics, but who expects to be engaged in research involving the creation and manipulation of corpora. The course may be able to accommodate other sorts of students, but if this description does not match you, you should consult with the instructor before making a final decision on whether to take it. Send email to rich@thomason.org. Students who come to the course with a project in mind will get the most out of it.

Course requirements will include a number of laboratory sessions and homeworks, a written proposal for a project, and the project itself, which will include a written description of the project work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Comparative Syntax: Romance. Meets with Linguistics 492.003.

Instructor(s): Acrisio Pires

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 492.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 005 Psychology of Language. Meets with Psychology 745.001.

Instructor(s): Julie Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/745/001.nsf

See Psychology 745.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 842. Seminar in Sociolinguistics.

Section 001 Stages of a Sociolinguistics Research Project

Instructor(s): Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we shall focus on the three main stages of a sociolinguistics research project; data collection, data analysis and data interpretation. Within this framework the emphasis of the course can be determined as appropriate by interests and ongoing projects of participant students.

We shall look at ways of designing specific projects in such a way as to achieve particular goals, using as examples specific pieces of research in both monolingual and bilingual communities. The seminar will involve a mixture of practical work and reading assignments.

With respect to the three stages specified, alternative fieldwork methods such as modified participant observation, versus carious types of survey procedure, questionnaire and language diary methods will be discussed. A range of analytic procedures will be reviews and considered. Interpretation of results (including alternative interpretations) will be discussed in light of appropriate social and linguistic models and frameworks.

This seminar is open to graduate students, a previous sociolinguistics course is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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LING 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 997. Special Research I and II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for LING.


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