College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Philosophy


This page was created at 9:23 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Philosophy
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Philosophy this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

PHIL 409. Philosophy of Language.

Section 001 http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/phil-lang/

Instructor(s): Richmond H Thomason

Prerequisites: Phil. 345 or 383. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive introduction to issues in the philosophy of language, concentrating on corresponding problems and phenomena in language itself.

Topics to be covered will include: Compositionality and phrasal meaning, the psychological reality of semantic representations, speaker meaning and pragmatics, intensionality, perception and verbs of perception, speech acts, aspect and eventualities, logical form, indexicals, focus and presupposition, and semantic primitives. Students who take this course should be prepared for extensive reading and in-class discussion. Course requirements: Either (1) a short paper (to be commented on and rewritten) and a final examination or (2) an extensive paper (with a draft due in in mid November). For more information, see the web page for this course at http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/phil-lang/.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 414. Mathematical Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jamie Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomas/phil414.html

This course is an advanced introduction to symbolic logic, intended to provide a foundation for understanding current research in philosophical logic and related areas of cognitive science. The course will concentrate on the theory of logic, and will cover the following topics:

1. Proof techniques and proof theory,
2. Models and validity,
3. Semantic completeness of propositional and quantificational logic, and
4. Incompleteness and undecidability

Written work will consist of problem sets and midterm and final exams. You must have completed philosophy 303 or some equivalent course. Students who are uncertain about their mathematical background should consult with the instructor before taking this course. Go to the following web site for more information about electing this course: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/phil414.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 428 / POLSCI 428 / ASIAN 428 / SOC 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001 Politics and Development in China.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/polsci/428/001.nsf

See Political Science 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PHIL 429. Ethical Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Allan F Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 361, 363, or 366. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This will be a course in contemporary metaethics. Metaethics is concerned with what ethical claims mean, and with the kinds of reasoning or evidence that justify ethical claims. The course will take up the ethical intuitionism of Moore and Ross, the emotivism of Ayer and Stevenson, Hare's universal prescriptivism, and recent proposals such as Rawls' theory of reflective equilibrium, Brandt's linguistic reform, new versions of "moral realism," and moral "expressivism" with "quasi-realism." Students should already have some background in moral philosophy in the twentieth century "analytic" tradition, preferably Philosophy 361 or the equivalent. Three short (five page) papers will be required, and there will be a midterm and a final examination. Classes will consist both of lecture and of discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 442. Topics in Political Philosophy.

Section 001 Eequality, Freedom, and Community

Instructor(s): Elizabeth S Anderson (eandersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 363, 366, or 441. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/phil/442/001.nsf

This course will explore controversies surrounding three prominent ideals in modern political philosophy: equality, freedom, and community. What forms of social and political organization best embody these ideas? Is equality a matter of distributing external goods equally among persons, or does it more centrally concern eliminating relations of domination among persons? Can freedom be realized through role differentiation? Are community rights inimical to freedom, or necessary for its full realization? These and other questions will be considered by confronting liberal theories with feminist, socialist, and communitarian theories. Likely authors include Mill, Rawls, Sandel, Herzog, Walzer, Habermas, MacKinnon, Okin, and Hooks. Classes will combine lecture and discussion. There will be two papers and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PHIL 443. Foundations of Rational Choice Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Joyce (jjoyce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in philosophy, economics, or psychology (or some combination thereof), and satisfaction of the quantitative reasoning requirement. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jjoyce/phil443.html

Philosophy 443 is a philosophically sophisticated introduction to the theory of rational choice that underlies orthodox treatments of decision-making behavior in economics, political science, and other social sciences. The course will investigate the strengths and weaknesses of the "standard" expected utility model of practical reasoning, and will explore some of the more popular alternative models. Its main focus will be on decision theory for the individual agent, but topics in game theory and social choice theory will be covered as well. There will also be a short section on the use of game-theoretic reasoning in evolutionary biology. Readings will be drawn from the literature in economics, psychology, political science and biology as well as philosophy. The course should be interesting and assessable to students from all five of these disciplines. Students should expect to take a midterm examination, a final, and to write two 12-20 page papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

PHIL 457 / BUDDHST 480 / ASIAN 480 / RELIGION 480. Topics in Buddhism.

Section 001 Theories and Practices of Buddhist Meditation

Instructor(s): Luis O. Gomez (lgomez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 230. (3). May not be included in a concentration plan in philosophy.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/buddhst/480/001.nsf

See Buddhist Studies 480.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 461. Continental Rationalism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edwin M Curley (emcurley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One philosophy introduction. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/461syl01.htm

"Continental Rationalism" is usually taken to refer to a philosophical movement in the 17th Century, whose most important representatives were Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and who are supposed to have shared an epistemological program which was overly optimistic about what could be known by pure reason, independently of experience.

This course will not focus as firmly on epistemology as is common in courses which bear this label. Instead it will be a broadranging course, which will pay attention to moral and political philosophy as well. We will look in detail at Descartes and Spinoza. But we will also give equal time to Hobbes (who is not usually classed as a rationalist). We will also examine critically the idea that the 'rationalists' did share an epistemological program of the kind they are usually thought to share. As background to the 'rationalists,' we will look briefly at other figures: Machiavelli, Erasmus, Luther, Montaigne, and Galileo.

This course is intended as the first installment of a sequence of two courses, the second of which will be offered Winter Term. Phil 462, British Empiricism, is a subject normally conceived to involve an exclusive focus on Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 462 will look in detail at Locke and Hume, but pay only passing attention to Berkeley. It will, however, deal with various of the French Enlightenment figures: Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, and (in some detail) Rousseau.

Between them the two courses are intended to provide a good survey of European intellectual history from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. But the courses are independent of one another. 461 is not a prerequisite for 462, nor must students who enroll in 461 go on to 462.

The formal prerequisite for these courses is only one introductory course in philosophy. But students who have only that minimal requirement may find the course difficult. We will be covering a lot of ground. I recommend that students have at least some philosophy at the 300-level (345, 361, or 383, would all be very helpful). If you have doubts about your preparation for the course, check with me by email: emcurley@umich.edu. For more information about the course, check my web site: www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 474. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy: Hegel and Marx and the Origin of Social Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James P Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Phil. 389. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover Nietzsche's early writings. Contact the instructor for more detailed course description.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 596. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A faculty-directed independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PHIL 597. Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Allan F Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu) , Jason C Stanley (jasoncs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The proseminar provides first-year Philosophy graduate students with an opportunity to engage as a group with a range of issues.

The focus of this proseminar is on the history of analytic philosophy of language and metaphysics, leading to work of recent years. The aim is to provide students with an advanced introduction to some central topics, theories, and debates in these broad areas. We will begin by discussing texts from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by Moore and Russell. Kripke's Naming and Necessity will be one major topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 598. Independent Literature Survey.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent literature survey in which a student reviews basic literature in a given area of philosophy and writes an extended bibliographic essay that sets forth a range of major positions within that area, indicates how various philosophers fit within this range of positions, and provides critical commentary on the positions, indicating, for example, the chief advantages and disadvantages of each, resulting in a critical bibliographic essay. Students must seek guidance from a faculty member in selecting a reasonable range of works for study. Students are encouraged to carry out such surveys during the summer months. If the ILS is to commence in the Spring/Summer or Fall, initial guidance should be sought the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, initial guidance should be sought no later than the preceding December. The bibliographic essays will be evaluated by the faculty member and may, if appropriate, be certified for distribution

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 599. Candidacy Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A faculty-directed candidacy reading course in which a student having already successfully completed an independent literature survey in the area of his or her projected dissertation works toward identifying a specific thesis topic and writing a dissertation prospectus, and begins to write material which can be expected to represent some component of the dissertation. If the reading course is to commence in the Fall, students should arrange for faculty direction the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, students should arrange for faculty direction no later than the preceding November. Faculty service in this capacity does not commit the student to asking the faculty member to serve on his or her dissertation committee, nor does it commit the faculty member to agreeing to do so. A student wishing to elect Philosophy 599 must submit a proposed plan of study no later than the beginning of the term for which the course is elected. (Students are urged to consult with their advisors and prospective faculty sponsors as early as possible during the planning of their Reading Course). The plan must be accepted by the faculty sponsor of the course within a week of the beginning of the term. A plan will normally not be acceptable if it overlaps significantly with a departmental course. When the plan of study has been approved by the faculty sponsor, the student will ask the sponsor to sign a Reading Course Approval Form (available from the department office). The student's advisor must countersign the form. The course approval form will be placed in the student's file.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PHIL 600. Advanced Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study program arranged between instructor and student.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 610. Seminar in History of Philosophy.

Section 001 Epicureanism

Instructor(s): Rachana Kamtekar (rkamteka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will study the major extant works on Epicureanism: Epicurus' Letters, Lucretius' On The Nature of Things, and collections of sayings attributed to Epicurus, as well as two less-studied Epicureans, Philodemus and Diogenes of Oenoanda, with a view to gaining an understanding of Epicurean ethics, physics, and theory of knowledge. We will begin by looking at some important influences on Epicurus (e.g. Democritus), continue our study by examining criticisms of Epicureanism made by philosophical contemporaries and the development of Epicurean thought in response to these criticisms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 611. Seminar in Current Philosophy.

Section 001 Externalism, architecturalism, and epistemic warrant

Instructor(s): Martin Davies

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topics for this seminar fall into three main areas of philosophy: philosophy of mind, philosophy of psychology, and epistemology. In philosophy of mind, we shall be concerned with externalism about content, and especially with an epistemological puzzle that arises when we combine externalism with a thesis of self-knowledge. In philosophy of psychology, we shall consider the relationship between personal and subpersonal levels of description, and especially the idea of subpersonal-level requirements for thought. Here again, an epistemological puzzle arises.
The two epistemological puzzles are instances of 'the problem of armchair knowledge'. It appears that armchair reflection provides a too easy route to substantive knowledge about the environment around us and the cognitive machinery inside our heads. We shall work our way towards a solution to this problem by considering limitations on knowledge by inference and relating issues about transmission of epistemic warrant with the literature on closure of knowledge under (known) entailment and on epistemic contextualism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 640. Seminar in Ethics.

Section 001 Virtue Ethics

Instructor(s): Philip J Ivanhoe (ivanhoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the movement in practical or normative ethics generally referred to as Virtue Ethics (VE). Most philosophers point to Elizabeth Anscombe's 1958 article "Modern Moral Philosophy" as the beginning of this revival of an approach to ethics that is characteristic of ancient Greek philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle and critical of the modern deontology and consequantialism. The aim of the seminar is to trace the history of the revival of VE, to understand its criticisms of modern approaches to ethics, and to evaluate the positive claims advocates of VE make.

Assignments:
Students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss the assigned readings and will turn in a one page response paper for each reading. In addition, each student will prepare a presentation on and lead the discussion for one of the weekly assignments. There is a final 15-20 page paper.

Texts:
Roger Crisp and Michael Slote, eds., Virtue Ethics (Cambridge: Oxford University Press, 1997). ISBN 0-19-875188-5 (pbk)
Michael Slote, From Morality to Virtue (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992). ISBN 0-19-509392-5 (pbk)
Coursepack, Huron Valley Publishing Company.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 697. Candidacy Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J David Velleman (velleman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Restricted to Philosophy Candidates and Philosophy Doctoral students nearing Candidacy. Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seminar for Philosophy graduate students achieving candidacy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for PHIL.


Page


This page was created at 9:23 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.