College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 9:27 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Sociology
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Sociology.

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SOC 420. Complex Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Azumi Ann Takata

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/soc/420/001.nsf

Formal organizations, or complex organizations, are ubiquitous in modern society. Our economy is composed of complex organizations; many of our political institutions are also complex organizations. Formal organizations also play a significant role in other spheres of our life religion, education, social services, sports, performing arts, etc. How are these organizations defined? Who are their members? How are they structured internally? How do they relate to other organizations, and the wider society? How do organizations and their members make decisions and carry them out as actions? These are some of the questions that this course will try to answer.

This course provides an introduction to contemporary theory and research on complex organizations, such as business enterprises, schools, government, and voluntary associations. We will consider the internal structure of organizations, the relationship of the organization to its environment, and organizational strategies and decision-making. The first part of the course covers the internal structure of organizations and introduces three perspectives on organizational structure: organizations as rational systems, as natural systems, and as open systems.

The second part of the course places the organization in a wider context and examines the organization's relationship to the various elements of its environment. We will learn how different theories conceptualize the organization's environment, and how organizations manage their relationship to the environment. In the third part of the course we will discuss a number of different questions and issues regarding organizational structure and behavior, such as the relationship between technology and structure, strategy and organizational structure, power and authority in organizations, organizational culture, conflict in organizations, and organizational learning.

The course will conclude with an examination of Japanese organizations. Using theories learned in the course, we will examine how and why Japanese organizations differ from Western organizations in their structure and behavior. By examining organizations in another society in a comparative perspective, we will gain important insights into complex organizations in our own society.

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SOC 426 / POLSCI 428 / ASIAN 428 / PHIL 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001 Politics and Development in China.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/polsci/428/001.nsf

See Political Science 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 435. Urban Inequality and Conflict.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deskins

Prerequisites: Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 435 and 535. (3). Does not meet Soc. doctoral requirements.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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SOC 440. Sociology of Work.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a general overview on core issues in the sociology of work. After reviewing major sociological perspectives on work and occupations, we will focus on labor market and inequality, work organizations, ethnographies of the workplace, globalization of production, diversity of workers, labor and social movements, intersection of work and family, unemployment and voluntary work, labor systems under capitalism and socialism, etc. Course materials will draw from different theoretical perspectives and from different societies. Format: each class meeting involves 40 minutes of lecture, followed by group discussions. From time to time, we will show labor-related films. Requirement: written assignments and a final take-home examination.

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SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 Postsocialist Transformation The decline of state socialism in late Twentieth Century Postsocialist Transformation The decline of state socialism in late Twentieth Century

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The decline of state socialism in late Twentieth Century is a world historic event with momentous and far reaching consequences. One after another, these former revolutionary societies pursue the route of reform, introducing a mix of market institutions and democratic politics. This course is a survey of some major aspects of such processes of social change, or "postsocialist transformation". To gain a grounded understanding, we focus on the case of the People's Republic of China, the remaining major socialist regime. From time to time, we will also draw on comparative materials from other societies in transition. The major questions we try to answer in this course include: What was socialism as a social system and a way of life? What explained its rise and demise? What are the impacts of reform on the social structure (class, elite and masses, rural-urban divide, state-society relation) and social relations (e.g., gender, family, work, communities)?

Requirements: Students must attend all class meetings. There will be two paper assignments (each about 8-10 pages) and one final examination. There is no pre-requisite or language requirement.

Format: Each class meeting will consist of 50 minutes of lecture and 30 minutes of discussion. Students are expected to do the assigned readings before coming to class, and contribute ideas and questions to the discussions.

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SOC 463 / COMM 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/comm/485/001.nsf

See Communication Studies 463.001.

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SOC 465 / PSYCH 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine how people become social deviants and how relevant social institutions contribute to this process. Early portions will examine the legal enforcement, judicial and corrections systems which together determine who will be designated deviant and with what consequences. Later portions will focus on particular forms of deviance (e.g., delinquency, theft, fraud, rape) with a view to understanding and evaluating the several theoretical perspectives that have been proposed to explain their genesis and perpetuation.

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SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 Detroit: Economic, Social and Racial Trends. (1 credit). Meets 10/2-10/11. (Drop/Add deadline=October 5).

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

*A One-Credit Mini Course to be Taught Three Times in the Fall Semester of 2001 (Sociology 495)

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

The first section class code # 18793 in the UM Time schedule, will meet on Tuesday afternoon, October 2 and Thursday afternoon, October 4 at 4 PM in a classroom to be designated later. Saturday October 6 will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday October 9 and Thursday October 11 afternoons.

The second section class code # 18794 will meet on Tuesday, October 30, Thursday, November 1; Saturday, November 3, Tuesday, November 6 and Thursday, November 8.

The third section class code #18795 will meet on Tuesday, November 13, Thursday, November 15, Saturday, November 17, Tuesday, November 19 and Tuesday, November 27.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students but a person may enroll in only one section.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

  • Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.
  • Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)
  • The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15.16.
  • One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for about $ 14.40.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

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SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 Detroit, Economic and Racial Trends. (1 credit). Meets 10/30-11/8. (Drop/Add deadline=November 2).

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

See Sociology 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 Detroit, Economic and Racial Trends. (1 credit). Meets 11/13-11/22. (Drop/Add deadline=November 16).

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

See Sociology 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 004 International Conflict Resolution: The Turkish-Armenian Case.

Instructor(s): Taner Akcam

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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SOC 500. Orientation Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fatma Muge Gocek

Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in the doctoral program of the Sociology Department. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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SOC 501. Proseminar on Detroit Area Study Topic.

Section 001 Meets with NR&E 501-042.

Instructor(s): Steve Brechin (sbrechin@umich.edu), Paul Mohai

Prerequisites: Graduate standing with intent to elect Soc. 512 in winter term. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is directly related to the 2001-2002 Detroit Area Study. For our research we will be conducting a comparative study of urban populations to understand more fully why concern for the environment has become an international, if not global, phenomenon, and what ramifications this amazing development might have for cross-cultural social understanding and international political action. This seminar's purpose is to explore the full range of social science research literature and existing conceptual understanding on the various dimensionalities [or meanings] of the environment, on how environment concern is formed and what values, if any, are linked to that concern. We are extremely interested in the possible differences and similarities that may exist cross cultures and whether or not a consistent or different set of dimensionalities and values, are at the core of the concern. In addition to the city of Detroit, we are planning on investigating environmental values and concern in other urban locations such as in Beijing China, Capetown, South Africa, Warsaw, Poland, Belle Horizonte, Brazil and possibly a few other places.

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SOC 503. Race and Culture.

Section 001 Race and Culture Contacts

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will examine different patterns of race and ethnic relations from a historical and comparative perspective. We examine how the belief in racial superiority evolved over time and in different places: the U.S. South, Brazil, Nazi Germany. In so doing, we also examine slavery, the plantation society, genocide, as well as the Indian caste system. The experience of the racial minorities is contrasted with that of the voluntary immigrants. We also seek to asses the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on contemporary outcomes in America and to examine contemporary problems, such as those of the persistent poverty of the underclass and segregation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 505. Theories and Practices of Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology 505 is the first term of a year-long course surveying the theories and practices of sociology. During this academic term, we trace the lineaments and genealogies of major approaches including utilitarianism, Marxism and neo-Marxism, cultural structuralism, post-structuralism, and Weberian and Freudian perspectives. We also explore various attempts by theorists to integrate these approaches. The course remains deliberately open-ended; we seek to convey a sense of what "doing theory" is all about, rather than envisioning a final theoretical or practical resolution.

The course includes both short orienting lectures, seminar-style class discussions and student presentations of supplementary recommended readings. Students will also be required to write three short papers.

This course is required of graduate students in Sociology.

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SOC 507. Logics and Strategies of Sociological Research Inquiry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu), Bill Axinn

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in sociology, other graduate students with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level course in the methods of sociological inquiry, analyzing the logics, strengths, and limitations of the various methods sociologists use. The course, which is required of first-year graduate students in Sociology, reviews both philosophical rationales and their concrete application across the rich and diverse topographies of the discipline. It is intended to provide broad exposure to research methodologies and to prepare students for further graduate work, including the required research practicum and courses in statistics.

Sociology 507 is open only to Sociology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 510. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/soc/510/001.nsf

This course is the first of a two-term sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab-discussion. In the first academic term we cover basic concepts of probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and statistical inference. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to develop statistical computing skills. The course assumes no prior knowledge of statistics and no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra. Requirements include problem sets (i.e., homework), a brief (2-3 page) paper (described in a separate handout), a term project (to be described in class), and midterm and final examinations.

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SOC 513 / POLSCI 513. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 Detroit Area Study research practicum.

Instructor(s): Robert Marans

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the 3rd in the series of courses comprising the Detroit Area Study research practicum. The course has three main components: 1) a series of lectures on issues of survey data analysis, 2) a set of readings targeted to lecture topics, and 3) individual student preparation of a research report that addresses a significant sociological research question using these data. Lectures and readings will focus on most of the following issues: data cleaning & file preparation; classification systems & recodes; descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing; sums of squares and the analysis of variance; data reduction through factor and/or cluster analysis & the development of indices; cross-classification of categoric data & the measurement of association; multivariatelinear regression tools; dummy-variable regression & multiple classification analyis; the logic of causal analysis & multiple dependent variables; multiple indicators, measurement errors & statistical analysis; report writing, graphics & the presentation of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 522. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods.

Section 001 Ethnographic Method

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first part of a two-term course on ethnography and the "ethnographic imagination". It explores the world of ethnographic research through critical reading of exemplary works in sociology, as well as explicit methodological formulations of the logic, the practice, and theoretical potentials of ethnography. The focus of the course is on the intersection of ethnography, theory and sociology. Readings will cover classics and contemporary works in different ethnographic traditions (e.g., the Chicago School, grounded theory, the extended case method, feminist ethnography) and their applications to diverse settings and topics. Half way through the first academic term, students begin to develop an ethnographic project of their choice, conduct fieldwork and comment on each others' field notes and analysis. The practicum sequel in the following academic term is a hands-on exercise of the craft of ethnography. We will concentrate on each others' projects and engage with issues emerging from actual field experiences, with reference to those covered in canonical texts in the first academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 530. Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Knodel

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive analysis of the basic demographic processes and their causes. How variations in mortality, fertility, nuptiality and migration arise and how they affect society. Illustrations are drawn from the United States and a variety of other countries.

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SOC 535. The Urban Community.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Undergraduates with permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 535. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc535/

Detroit was, arguably, the world's most important metropolis in the Twentieth Century. The modern system of industrial production was perfected there giving the world a product that greatly changed most cultures. The modern industrial union movement emerged in Detroit leading eventually to the development of a highly secure and politically influential blue-collar middle class. The United States and its Allies defeated Germany in World War II and the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the tremendous ingenuity of Detroit's engineers and the strong Blacks and hands of several hundred thousand Black and white men and women who produced planes, tanks, jeeps and munitions. But no other American metropolis has been as riven by both economic class and race as Detroit. The residents of no other city have given support to so many conflicting political and religious movements including the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s. the Black Muslims and Father Caughlin in the 1930s and a briefly vibrant Communist party. And Detroit is the only American city in which federal troops have been called out to the streets four times to put down black-white conflict.

This course will meet once each week in a classroom where assigned readings will be discussed. Each student will have to prepare a short two page paper summarizing and discussing the readings for that week several times during the semester perhaps as often as every other week. Approximately 8 to 10 times, the class will meet in a computer-equipped classroom. Training will be provided in how to analyze data about metropolitan issues from the public use Microdata samples of censuses, recent Current Population Surveys and, hopefully, from the 2001 American Community Survey which included metropolitan Detroit as a data point. Students will be given assignments to prepare descriptions of the social, economic and demographic characteristics of Detroit residents and then compare them to those of residents of other metropolises. These computational assignments should be linked to actual or potential dissertation research endeavors.

Students will have options in their reading assignments but the required ones will include parts of all of the following books:

  • Ze'ev Chafets, Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit
  • Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer, Detroit Divided
  • Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
  • Olivier Zunz, The Changing Face of Inequality: Urbanization, Industrial Development, and Immigrants in Detroit: 1880-1920.

For additional information about this course, please contact the instructor at: Renf@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 541. Contemporary Japanese Society: Convergence Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Azumi Ann Takata

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/soc/541/001.nsf

Recent media coverage of Japan has suggested that Japanese society is very different from American society. Even though many things are called the same in both countries, their meanings are not quite the same, or they function very differently. Is Japanese society really different, and if so, in what ways? In this course, we will examine the major social institutions of postwar Japan, with an emphasis on the most recent years. Social institutions are practices, relationships, and organizations that structure the daily lives of people. What are the major social institutions of contemporary Japan, and what are their structural features, and how do they function? We will begin with an attempt to answer these questions. A descriptive understanding, however, is not enough; we will ask why these institutions look and function the way they do, and what their implications are for the daily lives of the Japanese people. In the fifty years since the end of World War II, Japanese society has experienced rapid economic development and social structure, and their causes and consequences.

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SOC 555. Culture and Knowledge.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the core course for the Culture and Knowledge field in the Ph.D. program in the Department of Sociology. The course is designed as an introduction to the theoretical debates about culture, representation, and identity formation, and about issues of structure and agency raised by these debates. It explores classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to the study of culture and knowledge, and diverse methodologies including discourse analysis, narratives, frame analysis, and ethnography. We will discuss issues of interpretation and explanation in cultural sociology and the relationship of cultural sociology to cultural studies. We will focus on a few selected research areas that have been especially affected by the "turn to culture" including gender, race, class, and nation.

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SOC 575. Sociology of Health and Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the social aspects of health, aging and the health care system. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health care professions, health and health care among women and the poor, and the current health care crises in the U.S. and cross-national contexts.

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SOC 590. Proseminar in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology desirable. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended as a graduate-level introduction to social psychology. It takes a broad interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing ideas and research of interest to social scientists generally. Students are expected to read and then discuss in class approximately 100 pages of readings a week, generally from primary sources or from integrative review articles . Many of the readings are designated as "core" in the sense that they are included each time the course is taught until changed by the social psychology faculty; non-core readings are the ones that have been selected for use this term. Within this course, this distinction is not the one that makes a difference.

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SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 001 Data Collection Methods In Survey Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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SOC 597. Special Courses.

Section 002 Data Collection Method Analysis Of Complex Sample Survey Data.

Instructor(s): Steven G Heeringa

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/soc/597/002.nsf

This introductory course on the analysis of data from complex sample designs covers: the development and handling of selection and other compensatory weights; methods for handling missing data; the effect of stratification and clustering on estimation and inference; alternative variance estimation procedures; methods for incorporating weights, stratification, clustering, and imputed values in estimation and inference procedures for complex sample survey data; and generalized design effects and variance functions. The course will utilize exercises on real survey data to illustrate the methods addressed in class. Students will learn the use of computer software that takes account of complex sample design in estimation. For More Information: Email the instructor with questions or contact Gail Arnold at the Institute for Social Research, Room 1006, 734-764-4424. (garnold@isr.umich.edu).

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SOC 619. Quantitative Analysis of Data.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Soc. 610. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~yuxie/Courses/Soc619/index.htm

This course teaches statistical methods for analyzing categorical data, with an emphasis on practical applications rather than statistical theories. Three classes of statistical models will be covered: loglinear models for count data, logit/probit models for discrete dependent variables, and hazards models for studying transitions with longitudinal data. Familiarity with multivariate linear regression models for continuous dependent variables is assumed.

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SOC 682 / PSYCH 682. Advanced Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer K Crocker

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in sociology and permission of instructor. Priority is given to Ph.D. students in sociololgy. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 682.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 717 / STATS 580 / BIOSTAT 617. Methods and Theory of Sample Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/biostat/617/001.nsf

See Statistics 580.001.

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SOC 760. Power, History, and Social Change Research Seminar.

Section 001 RETHINKING MARX: Class, Race, Gender and Modernity

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or Instructor permission. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A rereading of Marx as a theorist of modernity, subjectivity and identity with specific application to the issue of class, race and gender. The course will stress the continuities (rather than the discontinuities) of Marx with Weber and Foucault and attempt to integrate cultural and material approaches. The class will read selectons from such classic works as The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts, The German Ideology, Manifesto, Capital, On the Jewish Question, Hegel's Philosophy of Right and the Grundrisse and secondary works on Marx as a theorist of capitalist modernity, and then apply this theory to the problem of class, race and gender. The first half of the course will focus on theory; the second half, on the issues of class, gender and race. Readings include Derek Sayer Capitalism and Modernity, Moishe Postone, Time, Labor and Social Domination, Jessica Benjamin Bonds of Love, Wendy Brown, States of Injury, Paul Gilroy Against Race, Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein Race, Nation, Class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 785 / PSYCH 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 785.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 803. Research Seminar in Race and Ethnicity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Harris (drharris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course engages major issues in the study of race and ethnicity through a combination of readings, group discussions, and presentations. Every effort will be made to integrate perspectives from disciplines other than sociology, and to address racial and ethnic issues outside the traditional Black-white paradigm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela J Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered every term. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per term. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use Sociology 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in Sociology 830 for at least two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 850 / PSYCH 890 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 001 Methodologies Seminar. (1 Credit).

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will meet to consider methodological issues that arise in research in the social sciences. Themes for each meeting will arise from ongoing research projects at the University of Michigan. Visiting researchers will provide a brief account of their aims and data before defining the methodological challenge for which they desire discussion. The meetings will be one hour each. However, there will be a longer "wrap-up" seminar toward the end of the term at which members will discuss key themes and findings that have arisen during the term. The responsibilities of seminar members are to attend regularly, participate in discussions, and help design the wrap-up session.

Advisory Prerequisites: Graduate Level Probability and Statistics or permission of the instructor.

This course may be repeated every term for credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 002 Economic Sociology. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Mark Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This research seminar is designed to provide graduate students with experience in constructing, presenting, reviewing, and criticizing articles in economic sociology and the sociology of organizations. Each week a student, faculty member, or invited outside speaker will circulate a manuscript and present the paper in a colloquium format. Students will be expected to read, and provide simulated journal manuscript reviews, of each week's paper as well as to participate in discussion of the paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 003 Women and Work. (3 Credits). Meets with Women's Studies 698.001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/soc/895/003.nsf

This course will draw on empirical research and theory from sociology, economics, psychology, anthropology, history, and organizational behavior to analyze a wide range of issues regarding gender and work. Drawing on studies of marines, clerical workers, managers, engineers, flight attendants, lawyers, nurses, doctors, manufacturing workers, domestic workers, interactive service workers, and contingent workers, we will study the construction of gender through work, effects of changing technology, structures of opportunity, emotion work, globalization of manufacturing work, sexual harassment, work and family, housework, gender segregation of jobs, pay inequality, and trends in paid labor force participation and attachment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 004 Life Goals, Evolution, & Mood . (3 credits). Meets with Psychology 500.005 and Psychiatry 700

Instructor(s): Randolph Nesse (nesse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/500/005.nsf

See Psychology 500.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Curr Rsch in Social Cognition (Credits?)

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 Advanced Statistical Methods, I. MEETS WITH PSYCH 613. (5 CREDITS).

Instructor(s): Kai U Schnabel

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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