College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 9:28 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Spanish
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Spanish.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Spanish this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

SPANISH 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, which will be taught in Spanish, is designed to introduce the student to the principle (morpho)syntactic) structures of Modern Standard Spanish. The following topics will be analyzed: grammatical gender, number, determiners, the pronominal system, adjective placement, object marking, the Spanish tense system, verbal aspect, verbal mood (indicative vs. subjunctive), voice (active vs. passive), word order. No previous background in linguistics is required. The grade will be determined by two exams (open-book take home), and a written assignment. Readings will be made available in a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 413 / ROMLING 413 / EDCURINS 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberly S Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Representations of the African Diaspora in Cuba and Brazil.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). For Grad credit, must do regular course work which is assigned, as well as write a 20 page research paper.May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Cuba and Brazil are the areas with the major concentration of African population in the Americas. Millions of Africans from different cultural backgrounds, philosophical beliefs and languages Nago, Bantu, Ashanti, Malé, Fula, Arara, Calabar, Yoruba survive the Atlantic middle passage. This course studies the cultural, social and philosophical contributions of these diverse groups, the ways they build social and cultural agency and how they are represented by cultural elites. Using examples from ethnography, sociology, film, documentary, and narrative we will analyze some of these cultural representations. Three papers of 4-5 pages are required. The class will be conducted in Spanish.

Texts: Gilberto Freyre's Casa Grande & Senzala, (Masters and Slaves) (selections); Fernando Ortiz' El baile y el teatro de los negros en el folklore de Cuba (selections); Lydia Cabrera, El monte ( 1st chapter); Ruth Landes The City of Women (selections); Ifá's Oracle (selections); Miguel Barnet's Biografía de un cimarrón (Autobiography of a Runaway Slave); poetry and documentaries such as Gloria Rolando's Ogún (1995) and Julio Ramos' La promesa (1996), and Tania Cipriano's Odo-Yá-Life with Aids (1998).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Historia de España de la Dictadura y la Transicion

Instructor(s): Encarnacion Lemus

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). For Grad credit, must do regular course work which is assigned, as well as write a 20 page research paper.May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 450. Middle Ages.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Introduction to the Middle Ages

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there." So says an English novelist in 1953. If the early 20th century feels like a foreign country, what to say about the Middle Ages? What to say about the Middle Ages in Spain? This class will think about travel and time, about time travel too, and about the confrontation with the "not-me" that any travel, historical, imaginative, or spatial entails. We'll read things written in the Iberian peninsula from the 10th through the 14th centuries: an epic about border-making and border-crossing (the Poema de Cid), a wild story of a wandering, skirt-chasing priest (the Libro de buen amor); we may even watch some time-travel movies. We'll read first-person stories of journeys made by real medieval people (Benjamin of Tudela; a woman named Egeria), and study the greatest of all travel routes in the period, the pilgrimage road to Santiago de Compostela, at the very Western edge of what for Europeans was the world.

Will we come back the same people from a trip to the end of the world?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 459. Don Quijote.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Don Quijote es la cumbre de la literatura española y una de las mas importantes de la literatura universal. En ella están presentes tanto los problemas e ideales y problemas de la época de su autor como los de todos los tiempos. La lectura del Quijote es un ejercicio de la mas alta calidad, reconfortante al mismo tiempo que produce una excepcional emocion estetica. El curso tiene como objeto que el estudiante haga una introduccion a la obra que le permita disfrutar tanto de los mundos ideologicos de retórico del Quijote. El estudiante debe leer detenidamente la obra y hacer un trabajo sobre un tema especifico, segun la metodologia que el profesor requiere.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 464. Spanish Romanticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Romanticism in Latin America.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

National consolidation and romantic novels go hand in hand in Latin America. We will begin this course discussing the notions of ideology, national culture, and social formation. We will then go on to compare three novels of the period: the Uruguayan José Marmol's Amalia (1851), the Colombian Jorge Issac's María (1867), and the Mexican Ignacio Altamirano's El Zarco (1888). Through the study of these three romantic novels we will explore the relationship between fiction, the formation of national states, and the organization of nineteenth-century free trade.

Students taking this course should be interested in Latin American politics. Course requirements will include three partial exams (60%) and a final take-home (40%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Retelling the Colonial Period: Fiction, Essay, and the Movies.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course proposes the study of some paradigmatic colonial texts of North and Latin America in order to compare the different ways in which the Spanish and British empires undertook conquest and colonization. It also purports to show students how colonial history has been retold, throughout the years, by fictional discourses such as novels and films as well as by non-fictional genres.

We will begin with Columbus' Diary, the first text to describe American lands. Many a trait found in later texts has its origin in this foundational account. We will also watch a couple of films that retell the story of the "discovery."

Cabeza de Vaca's pilgrimage, on the other hand, is the model for what Beatriz Pastor calls the narrative of defeat, where nature and not natives becomes the main and unbeatable enemy. We will watch the movie by Mexican filmmaker Echevarría and compare it to the colonial text.

Lope de Aguirre's letter to the king announcing his rebellion will be compared to two films (Aguirre, by Herzog, and El Dorado, by Saura) inspired by his adventures. From John Smith's documents we get an idea about the British methods and project of colonization of America. The film Pocahontas will help us see how Disney portrays, in a sanitized way, the complex story behind this American myth.

Walter Raleigh's account is yet another text that documents defeat at the same time it gives a portrait of imperial greed.

Shakespeare's The Tempest, Rodo's Ariel and Fernández Retamar's Caliban will help us see the way in which the characters created by the former have served both as symbols of the drama of colonization and as interpretive tools for the explanation of the predicaments of modern Latin America.

A course pack with articles and three other films (The Mission, How Tasty Was My Little Frenchman and Prospero's Books) complete the materials to be read and viewed in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Rosario Castellanos and Conflicts in Chiapas

Instructor(s): D. Marting

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The armed conflict in Chiapas, Mexico, did not truly begin on Jan.1, 1994, the date often repeated in the media, but may be said to have commenced with the conquest of the region by the Spanish five centuries ago. Without traveling back that far, however, even by staying within the twentieth century, it is possible to gain a certain historical perspective on the contemporary conflict and a greater understanding of the cultures and history of Mexico.

In this course, we will look at the works of a feminist writer from the mid-twentieth century, Rosario Castellanos, who wrote about the difficult and complex relations between Spanish speakers and those who spoke indigenist languages in the remote region of Chiapas. Her fictions, poetry, essays and theater are largely studied today for her feminist contributions, a facet we shall also examine. But our main texts are those of the Mexican's works that brought her international attention as a Neo-indigenist writer, that is, a non-Indian who promoted social change and social justice for oppressed native peoples in literature.

Ancillary to the study of Castellanos' writings, we will also examine a few journalistic accounts, essays, and testimonios by Mexicans such as Carlos Fuentes, Guiomar Rovira, and others. If possible, other narratives of the region will be compared to Castellanos and the other writings.

The class will be largely lecture at first, quickly moving into a discussion format. Each student will give three very brief oral reports, one each on:

  1. a specific facet of the region (geography, demography, etc.);
  2. an Internet news item published in Spanish about the area;
  3. a short story, essay or chapter that the class is reading.

The student should make every effort to coordinate these reports so that they provide the student useful information for the research paper on one of the literary works. The grade will be calculated according to the following percentages: 3 oral reports, 10% each = 30%; midterm and final 20% each = 40%; and research paper of 10-15pp., 20%; participation, 10%.

Readings: By Rosario Castellanos: Oficio de tinieblas, novela; Ciudad real, cuentos; Balún-Canán, novela corta. By Guiomar Rovira: Mujeres de maíz, periodismo. By Carlos Fuentes, from Nuevo Tiempo Mexicano y otros ensayos.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 INDIGENISTA NARRATIVE OF THE ANDES.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit, but not in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study three "indigenista" novels and one of the essays of the period. The basic premise of the course is that "indigenista" narrative was written with socio-political aims and anthropological interests. Beginning with the Bolivian novel Raza de bronce, written in 1919 by Alcides Arguedas, the course will focus on the development of "indigenismo," from Huasipungo, by the Ecuatorian Jorge Icaza, to El mundo es ancho y ajeno, by the Peruvian Ciro Alegria. The course will also discuss Jose Carlos Mariategui's Siete ensayos de interpretacion de la realidad peruana, the influential essay written in the 1920s.

Students taking this course are expected to be interested in the politics and economics of twentieth-century Latin America. The grade will depend on three short essays (60%) and a final take-home (40%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Erotic Poetry in Twentieth-Century Latin America

Instructor(s): Diane Marting

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The French philosopher and historian Michel Foucault wrote that sexuality was the obsession of the twentieth century. Eroticism, through not as inclusive a term as sexuality, certainly has seen a great and varied production in Latin America during this time. We will explore themes of gender and ideology in the poems of a series of major figures from a variety of countries and in different styles.

Some of the questions to be asked in this term are: how do we read and discuss erotic themes in a classroom? How are erotic themes treated in these poems? How is gender expressed? What does the eroticism mean? What is the cultural value of erotic themes? What does international fame mean when we are discussing the erotic poems by some of the most popular writers, such as Pablo Neruda? What does the variety of mainstream and radical desires say about the poets, their cultures and their genders? To what extent has postmodernism's intermingling of high and low cultures, of intimate and public themes, of international media and local/personal expression changed erotic poetry? Are there differences between erotic poetry and sexual prose that we can ascertain?

The two writers on which we will concentrate, Delmira Agustini from the beginning of the twentieth century, and Pablo Neruda from the middle of it, are two classic poets of the erotic genre. In addition, we will examine the poems in an anthology of women writers, and through xeroxes or a copypack, more recent work by men and women.

The class will begin with an introduction to formal aspects of reading poetry, then move into discussions of specific poems based on student reports. Students will give a brief oral report on one poem each by Agustini or Neruda, and one on a more recent poet. There will be two required papers, one on either Agustini or Neruda, and one on any other poet covered in the class. These papers should be around 8-10 pp. and ideally will be coordinated with or come from the oral reports. Three partial exams during the term will also be required. Grading scale: two oral reports: 5% each, 10%; 2 partial exams, 20% each, 40%; 2 papers, 20 each, 40%, participation, 10%. Students will also be asked to sign that they know that the course might contain explicit sexual material and are willing to read such assignments, and to discuss and write about them. It will be difficult to offer substitute readings or assignments due to the nature of the class topic.

Readings: 1) El placer de la palabra, literatura erótica femenina de América Latina, Antología crítica. Ed. Margarite Fernández Olmos y Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert. 2) Pablo Neruda, Los versos del capitán; 3) Delmira Agustini, Poesías completas; 4) copypack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Los republicanos españoles en exilo de America

Instructor(s): Encarnacion Lemus-Lopez

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 Don Juan.

Instructor(s): Andrew A Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Of the several legendary or archetypal figures bequeathed to us by Spanish literature among them the Cid, La Celestina, Don Quijote and Sancho Panza Don Juan holds a position of prominence. In this upper-level course we will investigate the emergence and development of this figure by reading key Spanish texts in which he is the protagonist. Adopting a broadly historical approach, we will start with Tirso de Molina's El burlador de Sevilla (seventeenth century), in which Don Juan appears for the first time. Next, we will read José Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio and José de Espronceda's El estudiante de Salamanca (nineteenth century), while in the latter half of the academic term we will move on to more modern texts, plays, short stories and novels, by Jacinto Grau and Ramón del Valle-Inclán, among others, which offer a diverse range of treatments of this enduring figure.

Attention will be paid both to the constants and variables in Don Juan's character and behaviour, and individual authors' treatments of the figure and his actions will be studied in the light of the historical circumstances in which they lived and wrote, showing how different ages essentially produced different Don Juans.

Teaching is by a mixture of lecture, class discussion, and some informal oral presentations. Evaluation is by attendance, class participation, and several medium-length papers. The class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish. Regular attendance and active participation are essential to the successful completion of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 Language, Selfhood, and Community in Hispanic America

Instructor(s): Hugo Moreno

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine different conceptualizations of the relationship between language, selfhood, and community by analyzing various discourses on Hispanic/Latin/American cultural identity. We will explore the ways in which theories and narratives of cultural identity take for granted particular notions of language, selfhood, and community that are far from indisputable or given. By the end of the course, students should emerge with a critical understanding of a wide range of Hispanic/Latin/American conceptions of cultural identity, and a broad sense of the different notions of language, selfhood, and community that Hispanic/Latin/American theorists and poets have proposed.

In this course we will acquaint ourselves with various twentieth-century discourses and critiques of the notion of cultural identity in general, as well as discussions on Hispanic/Latin/American cultural identity in particular. Specifically, we will review theoretical discourses on "el espíritu americano" (Rodó), "la americanía" (Henríquez Ureña), "la expresión americana (Lezama), "la conciencia americana" (Zea), and "Pan-American consciousness" (Saldívar). We will also examine various novels and poems that dialogue with, challenge, subvert, or re-create particular conceptions of "lo hispano/latino/americano." The tentative list includes Neruda's Canto general, del Cabral's Dos cantos continentales y unos temas eternos, Arguedas' Ríos profundos, Méndez's Peregrinos de Aztlán, Cortázar's Libro de Manuel, Hinostroza's Contra Natura, Braschi's El imperio de los sueños, and Bueno's Mar paraguayo. In conjunction with these readings, we will discuss articles by a variety of contemporary scholars that address questions of cultural identity from the vantage points of gender, class, race, sexuality, postmodernism, postcolonialism, and latinamericanism (e.g., Albó, Benhabib, Butler, Calderón, Castro-Gómez, Cornejo Polar, Echeverría, García Canclini, Gilroy, Hall, Hopenhayn, Quijano, Mignolo, Moreiras, Pratt, Richard, Sandoval, and Spivak).

This course is reading intensive. Students are expected to participate actively and consistently in class discussions. Course assignments include an oral presentation (5-8 minutes), six response papers (about 2 pages each), and two position papers (10-15 pages).

  • The course will be conducted in Spanish.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 528 / ROMLING 528 / FRENCH 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gallego De Blibeche

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

    Section 001 Cinema of Immigration and Exile. Meets With Film-Video 603.001 and American Culture 699.001

    Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Film and Video Studies 603.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 865. Studies in Colonial and 19th Century Spanish-American Literature.

    Section 001 ANDEAN PEOPLES: BEFORE AND AFTER THE INCA

    Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will focus on Ancient Andean civilization and the early colonial period in Perú. Its goals are to give students a general idea about the cultural peculiarities of Inca civilization (with special attention to its institutions and its religion) as well as a general overview of the indigenous societies that preceded that civilization. We will read two authors whose native language was Spanish (Juan de Betanzos and Inca Garcilaso) and whose cultural background was mostly European. The latter, however, being the son of a Spanish Captain and an Inca princess, was familiar with Quechua, the indigenous language spoken in the area of influence of the Inca empire. We will study their descriptions of Inca social, political and economic organization, as well as their version of Inca religion.

    We will also read a scholarly work on religious issues (by Sabine MacCormack) and compare it to what the previous authors had said about the topic. Next, we will study a text by a Quechua native speaker: Titu Cusi Yupanqui (the penultimate Inca), who will provide us with substantially different views on Inca culture.

    The book by Steve Stern deals with the different ways in which indigenous peoples from the Andes (in this case, from Huamanga) adapted to the changes provoked by European colonization. The book by Michael Moseley will introduce us to the different cultures and civilizations that preexisted the Inca in the Andean region. Finally, the compilation by Malpass will shed some light on the potential of a research agenda that combines the study of colonial chronicles with archaeological investigations.

    There will also be a course pack with articles about both early human occupation of the Andes and the fate of biodiversity in the region.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    SPANISH 881. Current Issues in Literary Theory and Criticism.

    Section 001 Transculturations: Cultural Criticism in Latin America.

    Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and two 600-level literature courses. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Culture has been a discursive realm for understanding Latin American literature and criticism. What is the relationship of transculturation with these views about culture? Fernando Ortiz" transculturation has become a central paradigm for understanding languages, bodies, representations, and global economies in our contemporary world. As a critical practice transculturation has shaped the works of critics such as Ángel Rama, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Walter Mignolo and Nelly Richard among others. In literature it shaped the work of writers such as José Ma. Arguedas, João Guimaraes Rosa, and Alejo Carpentier. Through the relationship between orality & writing, mestizaje & hybridity, sexuality & gender, we will study transculturation as a modern concept which origins can be traced to colonial societies. We will discuss themes such as, cultural subjectivity, representations of the subaltern, migrant subjectivities, social power and identity politics, among others. Class will be conducted in Spanish. Reaction papers (every week) (2 pages) discussing the readings are required. A final paper of 20-25 pages is required.

    Texts: Garcilaso de la Vega, (Perú), Comentarios reales (Sel.), Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (México), Poemas y teatro (Sel.), Esteban Echeverría (Argentina), El matadero, José Ma. Arguedas (Perú), Los ríos profundos, A. Carpentier (Cuba) Ecue-Yamba-Ó, Manuel Zapata Olivella (Colombia) Changó el gran putas, João Guimarães Rosa, (Brasil) Grande Sertão: Veredas (Sel), Silviano Santiago (Brasil), Stella Manhattan, Pedro Lemebel (Chile) La esquina es mi corazón (Crónica urbana), Giannina Braschi (Puerto Rico/NY), El Imperio de los sueños (Sel), Mayra Santos (Puerto Rico) Tercer mundo (poesía), Tato Laviera-Amerícan (poesía).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 993 / ROMLING 993 / FRENCH 993 / ITALIAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Instructor(s): Gallego De Blibeche

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Romance Linguistics 993.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a Doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


    Undergraduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


    Page


    This page was created at 9:28 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


    LSA logo

    University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

    This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

    Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

    Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.