College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 5:36 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ANTHRCUL 414 / CAAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 438. Urban Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What characterizes life in an urban society? What are the common features and/or variations between urban societies situated in different cultural and historical contexts? In addressing such questions, this course will be organized around two broad concerns:

  1. the anthropology of cities: the main factors shaping the nature of urban life, the historical emergence of urban forms, and different forms of urbanism and
  2. anthropology in cities: examining themes such as social networks, class, gender, idioms of identity, and the status of institutions, with reference to specific ethnographic accounts.

Topics will be addressed through lectures and classroom discussion and will be based on the reading of required texts. Assessment will be based on two take-home exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Nautical Archeology. Meets with ANTHRARC 683.001

Instructor(s): John O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected twice for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 486 / ACABS 488. Archaeology of Ancient Mesopotamia.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Alan Emberling

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/acabs/488/001.nsf

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 488.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 507 / REES 507. East European and Post-Soviet Ethnography.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 526. Traditions of Ethnology I.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a year-long sequence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 530. Oral History and Narrative Identity.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Oral histories are spoken memories about the past. In "managed" or negotiated conversations, subjects recall experiences which they now find relevant from a contemporary standpoint, bearing witness to the everyday, the tramatic, the spectacular and the silent. In response to prompts by interviewers, speakers explain, in sometimes subtle and context-bound languages, why they believe episodes happened as they did and attempt to account for their own involvement. Methodologically, oral histories can stand alone, to ve read and analyzed on their own terms, or they can supplement other "ways of knowing" to be found in archives, quantitative data bases, written records and memoirs. Through narrative, individuals and communities conceptualize social processes in the form of stories, with leading charactres, plot structures and time boundaries. From this perspective, embedded in oral histories are narratives that people use to help them make sense of various occurrences in their lives. At a broader level of abstraction, local and national cultures also create and foster "meta-narratives" or composite understandings shared by larger groups of protagonists at particular points in history. This course is about oral histories and other specifically narrative constructions of selfhood. We will cover various theories and debates surrounding oral history and narrative, and read several ethnographies which utilize these concepts. Student evaluations willl be based on class participation, several short writing assignments and in-class exercises, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 532. Politics and Practice of Ethnography.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate students, qualified seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Ethnography" contains two distinct senses: fieldwork and writing. It is as a category of anthropological writing that we will explore current discourses on ethnography, and the place of archival research and fieldwork (and especially field notes) therein. In reading ethnographies published from the turn of the century to the present, we will investigate the articulation of: form and content, figure and ground, and theory and practice, and analyze narrative styles and structure, the relationship between field notes and published texts, and uses of illustrations and photographs, foreign languages, acknowledgments, bibliographies, and various other political (and politicized) ethnographic forms and practices. An author's professional and social position and identity will be included as grist for our analytical mill, and we will situate each ethnography within its historical and academic context. By the same token, each text will serve as a point of departure for an exploration of historically situated ethnographic methods, including archival work, and anthropological theories. The formation and revision of anthropological canons, and coevality of theoretical approaches is a part of this exploration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where does the story of the observer end and the story of the observed begin? Autobiography, ethnography, and fiction share a concern with constructing meaningful representations of the self and of the other in narrative form. This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices. Our theoretical aim will be to gain an understanding of our current historical moment as one in which writers both inside and outside of the academy are pursuing intersecting trajectories in their use of the personal voice to explore the social world. We will consider the recent "memoir boom" and its impact on the academy as well as the academy's impact on its flourishing. We will also consider gender differences in the use of the personal voice, exploring the fine line that distinguishes "reflexive" (often coded as "male") and "confessional" (often coded as "female") writing within anthropology. And we will ask what anthropology, as a personal act of witnessing scripted in diverse genres, means at the end of the century. Our practical aim will be to gain expertise in the analysis and use of a range of textual strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places, times, and subjectivities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Intersectionality and Women's Health: Ethnographic Approaches Meets with HBHE 656.001 and Women's Studies 698.005

Instructor(s): Marcia C Inhorn

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar, open to students in public health, anthropology, and women's studies, is designed to explore in an in-depth fashion how the intersections of race/class/gender and other axes of "difference" (i.e., age, sexual orientation, disability status, immigrant status) affect women's health in the contemporary United States. In this course, recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and "multiplicity of oppressions" theories will be introduced. Weekly, student-led, feminist-oriented seminar discussions will revolve around twelve book-length ethnographic studies, which examine some aspect of intersectionality and women's health outcomes in the U.S. Through reading, thinking, talking, and writing about a series of ethnographic monographs, students in this course will gain broad exposure to a number of exigent women's health issues in the U.S., issues of ethnographic research design, and the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminist, (medical) anthropological, and public health scholars. Students will be graded on seminar participation, leadership of one seminar discussion, and a comparative written review of three books on black women's health in the U.S. Books to be covered in the seminar include:

Emily Martin, The Woman in the Body: A Cultural Analysis of Reprodcution

Martha Ward, Poor Women, Powerful Men: America's Great Experiment in Family Planning

Leith Mullings, Stress and Resilience: The Harlem Women's Reproductive Health Project

Paul Farmer et al., Women, Poverty, and AIDS: Sex, Drugs, and Structural Violence

Elisa Sobo, Choosing Unsafe Sex: AIDS-Risk Denial Among Disadvantaged Women

Claire Sterk, Tricking and Tripping

Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Girl, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures

Pamela Ericksen, Teenage Childbearing in East L.A.

Mimi Nichter, Fat Talk: What Girls and Their Parents Say About Dieting

Ellen Lewin, Lesbian Mothers: Accounts of Gender in American Culture

Helena Ragone, Surrogate Motherhood: Conception in the Heart

Gelya Frank, enus on Wheels: Two Decades of Dialogue on Disability, Biography, and Being Female in America

Renee White, Putting Risk in Perspective: Black Teenage Lives in the Era of AIDS

Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty

Susan Smith, Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women's Health Activism in America, 1890-1950

This course is a meet-together, and HBHE (SPH) is the home department. Enrollment is limited, so students interested in taking the course must seek permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Political Violence & Historical Memory. Meets with History 604.003

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/558/002.nsf

In this course we will explore the relationship between political violence and historical memory in a range of societies and periods. We will consider how violence both produces and destroys cultural meanings and social memory, and how the concept of violence itself undergoes historical shifts. A central focus of the course will be on the role of the state, in particular as it shapes social conditions and political discourses and intervenes in the interpretation and commemoration of conflicts. We will thus be concerned with the links among events of exceptional and ordinary violence, the hierarchies and exclusions embedded in social relations and cultural understandings, and the forms in which violent events are remembered and forgotten. The ways in which violence is enacted, experienced and remembered is intertwined with differing institutional domains, representational practices, and beliefs. We will view the contestation of memories as a path for tracing these connections. Among the themes that we will examine are: the racialization and gendering of violence; spatial and temporal dimensions of violence; terror and meaning; forms of historical memory. We will examine a range of cases, including India, Northern Ireland, Sri Lanka, Haiti, Argentina, and Guatemala, and will use a variety of materials including film. Students will make class presentations, write a bibliographic essay, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology or biology. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/576/001.nsf

This course is an intensive introduction to theoretical issues in linguistics of special relevance to anthropologists, most of whose primary interests are outside of language. Think of language as a special kind of semiotic or cultural system. Our subject matter, then, consists of ways of approaching its formal description and the general issues (for the most part, about the nature of culture) that are raised by those approaches. Several such issues will continually crop up:

  1. The nature of cultural patterning, its representation by members of a culture, and the means we use to describe it; is it possible to understand cultural patterning from the outside? How does our point of view change in the course of analysis?
  2. The possibility of cross-cultural comparison and typology using culturally-meaningful (or "emic") patterns as a basis; can general "laws of structure" of cultural form be constructed from descriptions of particular cultural systems?
  3. Are there true universals of culture? If universals do exist, what is their basis? Are they biologically determined, determined by the nature of the cultural code, or some combination of the two? What evidence is required to make sense of the question?
  4. What does it mean for individuals to share a culture? Does "sharing a culture" require collective representations? Are there any?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 578. Monographs in the Ethnography of Speaking.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with some major book-length works in the ethnography of speaking i.e., works that take an ethnographic approach to language, with a focus on speaking as social action. Readings will range from studies that approach language ethnographically to studies that approach ethnography through linguistic practices. Several different theoretical perspectives, methodologies, and kinds of ethnographic settings will be represented. By examining detailed field studies, both classic and recent, we will consider ways in which ethnographers have drawn on linguistic evidence to make inferences about social relations and cultural patterns; similarly, we will consider ways in which social relations have offered evidence about language. In reading monograph-length studies, we will take the opportunity to consider the monograph itself as a genre of ethnographic representation, and to consider the ways in which insights about linguistic practices can be used to develop fine-grained and complex social analyses. Requirements include several short writing assignments, class participation, and a final paper. Prerequisite: Anthropology 576 or two courses in formal linguistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 579. Semiotic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001 Meets with Sociology 760.001.

Instructor(s): Webb Keane (wkeane@umich.edu), George P Steinmetz

Prerequisites: 400-level course work in Anthropology and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Signs and representations have come to play a central role in current understanding of society, culture, and politics. This seminar explores the genealogy of contemporary approaches to signs through the close reading of selected theoretical works, from such foundational figures as Peirce, Saussure, and Mauss to more recent writings, including Derrida, Foucault, Bourdieu and others. The seminar raises questions about the assumptions and implications of these approaches for the empirical study of society and culture. This course is not a survey--the syllabus is intentionally limited, and is intended to provide an opportunity for careful and critical approaches to the tests. Students interested in cultural theory are welcome from any department. This year, we will meet with Sociology 760 (Research Seminar in Power, History, and Social Change).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 629. Method and Interpretation in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. (1, 3).

Credits: (1, 3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing, to data collection and analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Anthro/History Core Seminar. Meets with History 604.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about theory, methods, and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on the interplay of history and anthropology. This course will be based on the internsive discussion of classical and pathbreaking articles and monographs. It is particularly intended for students in the Anthropology and History Program as well as graduate students in the Departments of History and Anthropology who are interested in developing projects which involve the integration of historical and anthropological perspectives. This course will meet once a week in the evening. Students will have the option of developing their concerns doing summer research and taking a research seminar during the Fall, whether written work and research in progress will be discussed. Students interested in taking this course are encouraged to send a brief (one page) email notice or written statement to the instructor indicating their interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts: Gender, Religion, and Visual Culture. Meets with History of Art 720.001 and 772.001 and Rackham 570.001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu), Patricia Simons, Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 720.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of istructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the content and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Richard E Nisbett (nisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or a Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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