College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 5:38 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


COMPLIT 600. Topics in Theory.

Section 001 Introduction to Comparative Literature Studies.

Instructor(s): Vassilios Lambropoulos (vlambrop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to a wide selection of current theories and methods. It will be organized around the published or forthcoming work of Professors in the Program in Comparative Literature. Thus major and emerging scholarly and intellectual trends will be presented through the writings of faculty actively involved in them. Each week, students will discuss with a different Comparative Literature faculty a pre-circulated part of his or her research (assigned by the author in consultation with the course's instructor) in order to explore in depth its approach and some of the controversies surrounding it. Essentially, the course will function as a wide-ranging introduction to the theoretical debates of our time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 698. Directed Reading in Comparative Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 750. Seminar: Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 The Materiality of Ideas.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/complit/750/001.nsf

According to one story, Plato taught the West that ideas are bodiless, the very antithesis of mutable matter. Perhaps that story has taught us into a corner. We'll try in this course to study that corner, and to think and feel and work our way out of it. We'll think about the bodies of ideas: things like words, spoken and written; books, manuscript, printed and virtual; the daily practices of people, especially idea-people like students, teachers and writers. Material for the course starts with Plato and runs up through last week on the web; material for the course starts from and is pointed back into each participant's intellectual practice. We'll draw equally on books and bodies, theories and practices in a workshop that aims to introduce all of us to these problems and their implications.

Open to graduate students and undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

Possible Readings:

  • Jean Guitton, A Student's Guide to Intellectual Work
  • Plato, Republic (selections) and Phaedrus
  • Roger Chartier, The Order of Books
  • James Elkins, What Painting is
  • Nicholson Baker, Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper
  • Roland Barthes, Pleasure of the Text
  • William Blake, Marriage of Heaven and Hell
  • Richard of Bury, Philobiblon

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 770. Seminar: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Minority Studies

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

'Minority Studies' involves the study of the history, cultural production, and political formation of ethnic and religious minorities in Europe. The central question for this seminar concerns the political and cultural transformations produced by minority groups in Europe, specifically, Roman and Sinti, Kurds, Armenians, Jews, and postcolonial migrants. The seminar will illuminate concepts of national and ethnic identity formation in a general comparative framework and draw on literature, cultural studies, and gender studies. We will contrast scholarly and political approaches to minorities within countries such as Great Britain, Germany, Turkey, and France that have shaped the debate. From a theoretical perspective, the seminar takes as its point of departure the concept of 'minor literature'. We will cover readings on Eurocentrism, globalization, postcoloniality, Diaspora, identity politics, ethnicity and transnationalism. The graduate seminar will also participate in the symposium "The Project for the Future of Minority Studies" sponsored by the Program in Comparative Literature in October 2002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 780. Seminar: Studies in Form and Genre.

Section 001 Theory of Tragedy. Meets with German 752.001.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 752.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 790. Seminar in Literary Theory.

Section 001 Literature and Empire.

Instructor(s): Lydia Liu

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to examine the condition of comparative work in empire studies and postcolonial scholarship. Our readings which include theoretical works as well as literary texts revolve around the questions of signification, translation, and the global circulation of meaning. We will examine how value functions in linguistic and economic exchange and explore the relevance of this concept to the contemporary theories of language and power. Topics of discussion include fetishism, cultural difference, colonial modes of exchange, and the politics of equivalence or non-equivalence in comparative discourse.

Work in this seminar consists of active class participation in weekly discussions, individual oral presentations on assigned readings, and the preparation of a substantial term paper (20-25pp.).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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