College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 7:35 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Old English. This course satisfies either the Pre-1600 or Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators. Meets with English 501.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison Reality. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Technology and the Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf02/415f02syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

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ENGLISH 427 / THTREMUS 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENGLISH 327. Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course operates as a workshop in which students discuss 1) poems by fellow students and 2) the poems of distinguished authors, mainly contemporary, as we find them in a required anthology, handouts, poetry readings, and elsewhere. Students will report orally on each other's work, keep a journal of readings on the subject of poetry, and meet regularly with the instructor for individual tutorials. Grades are based on the quality and quantity of work, as well as class participation. Permission of instructor is required for enrollment. Leave a portfolio of 5-8 poems for the instructor during the week before class begins.

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ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Mark Koch (markkoch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/430/001.nsf

This class will explore the origin, development, and early formal experiments of the most important literary form of the last several centuries. In our examination of this still rather recent narrative genre, we will consider the social, economic, and technological elements that helped to make the novel and which the novel sometimes helped shape--and the question of whether the novel has now run its course as a vital and influential art form.

Our first days will be spent deliberating the various wide-ranging contemporary definitions of the term novel, considering the elements of picaresque, romance, and travel narratives, and discussing the degree to which the earliest novels conformed to or broke from these narrative forms. We will begin our reading with Part One of Cervantes' Don Quixote and pieces of early English prose fiction before settling upon that kind of realistic story that developed primarily in England sometime around 1700. We will then read Aphra Behn's Oroonoko and Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders, Samuel Richardson's Pamela, Henry Fielding's Tom Jones, Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto, Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy, and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

I have a particular interest in how the rise of the novel corresponds to a rise in realistic graphic depictions of space and place, as well as to how it corresponds to a shift in epistemology and political and economic power, but this course will also consider issues of the author, authority and the reader; form and plot; class, gender, rebellion, and transgression; and the novel in relation to other kinds of narrative art.

In addition to heavy reading, the student work in this course will include two formal analytical papers, weekly response papers, two exams, attendance and participation in class discussion.

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ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For novel lovers, the Victorian era is the golden age. The novels produced during this period of British literature - 1937-1801 - combined all the riches of the novel form. In modern fiction, we separate the romance novel from the political, crime fiction from high art, a study of mores and manners from pot-boilers. The Victorians put all these parts together and what emerged was the Victorian novel. Commonly written for serialization, and thus designed to bring back readers for the next month's installment, their plots envelop and captivate the reader. Attempting to imitate the cultural life that produced them, authors represented the great conflicts of the day, e.g., the situation of women, the divisions between rich and poor, and the political parlor games in which marriages were arranged like business deals. What is arguably most interesting about these novels is the complicated relationship they had to the strict moral and behavioral codes for which the Victorian era is known. Some novels at once endorsed and questioned these assumptions. Others boldly satirized the hypocrisies to which the code was liable, and at the same time built plots that upheld the very values they satirized. These oddly subversive elements will provide the focus of this course. Our texts will include classic novels by C. Brontë, Dickens, Eliot, James, possibly Austen, Trollope, and/or Stevenson, and some contemporary perpsectives on the fiction through the eyes of movies based on these novels. There will also be brief selections from intellectual and cultural documents provided on our website. Requirements include two ten-page essays, a final, regular class attendance, and participation in class discussion.

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ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin this course with a text that is perhaps neither American nor a novel: Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1689). I do this not to be perverse, but because it shows the novel form as it was first developing out of the Romance, and because it shows how the society of British America was an economic and cultural product of the larger Atlantic world as opposed to fresh sprung from the soil of the Eastern seaboard. This text raises certain issues and topics we will find ourselves tracing throughout the term: travel or movement through space, the significance of place and environment, the status (gender/race/nationality/class) of the author, the narrator's persona, the representation of racial and cultural conflict, spirituality, changes in the form of the novel, and masculinity/femininity. We will read Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland (in which both a character and Enlightenment Reason spontaneously combust), Herman Melville's Moby Dick and Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (to allow us to think in very different and wonderful ways about watery worlds of men), Edith Wharton's House of Mirth, Zora Neal Hurston's Their Eyes Are Watching God, William Faulkner's Sound and the Fury and, ending with the post-World War II Pacific and Native-American world, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony. You will give one brief oral presentation, bring in reading questions every class, and write three short papers. Attendance and participation are an absolute must..

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ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Zemgulys

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/433/001.nsf

This course will explore novels by British and American writers from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in light of these writers' attempts to innovate upon the novel form. We will pay special attention to the relation between experiments in literary form and the theme of knowledge in these novels (themes regarding self-knowledge, narrative omniscience, and discovery) and to representations of non-literary modes of knowledge gathering (such as geography, history, psychology, and economics). The course will conclude with mid-twentieth-century novels that engage with the themes we've explored, and that will allow us to think about the legacies and conventions of the ostensibly anti-conventional modern novel of the early twentieth century. The reading list will include fictional works by Henry James, Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Ralph Ellison, and Tayeb Salih, as well as non-fictional essays collected in a course reader.

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ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how several contemporary authors define the novel form. We'll discuss novels mainly from a writer's perspective, considering architecture, approaches to character, narration, language, imagery, and voice, as well as the cultural and artistic dialogues these novels engage in. Over the term we'll read work primarily but not exclusively by North American writers: Michael Cunningham, Kathryn Davis, Louise Erdrich, Kent Haruf, Toni Morrison, and Michael Ondaatje. We will consider the ways in which each of these writers conceptualizes the novel and the art and act of story-making; the interweaving of narrative and lyrical impulses; the possible relationships to other arts and to individual and collective histories. This course may be of particular interest to undergraduate fiction writers.

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ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the rise of modern drama in the Western world by concentrating on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Brecht. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to read a dramatic text for its performative qualities and its potential for enactment. Although no previous experience in the study of drama or theater is required, the course will begin by concentrating on the differences between the modern repertory and the forms we associate with Classical and Shakespearean dramatic conventions. Other topics of consideration include: the transformation from melodrama to modern drama; the social consciousness of the twentieth-century stage; and the rise of the female figure as subject of dramatic inquiry.

Requirements: There will be three papers of 5-7 pages each; a midterm; and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover texts in American literature from the colonial period of the early seventeenth-century writings of John Smith to the 1830s. We will examine how "American" writers wrestle with certain concepts, for instance, the New World, being American, freedom, democracy, slavery, and the Indian, that all merge to construct a unique American personage. We will be reading works by John Smith, Mary Rowlandson, Anne Bradstreet, Crevecoeur, William Bradford, Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, and James Fenimore Cooper.

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ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Three Modern Poets: Pound, Eliot, and Stevens. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine what three major writers Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens have to teach us about the kinds of relations possible among art, society, and individual experience. We will consider their chief works both in themselves and as responses to personal, political, and literary problems such as the construction of modernism, the impact of two world wars and the psychological problems of twentieth-century life. The readings are primarily poetry, both lyrics and longer works like Pound's Mauberley sequence, Eliot's The Waste Land, and Stevens' Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction, with some critical prose by the authors themselves. We proceed by a mixture of lecture and discussion. There are two papers (about six pages each) and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 e.e. cummings. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of e.e.cummings, one of the great artists and personalities of the 20th century. Cummings is primarily known for his poetry, but he was also a significant painter, playwright, novelist, critic, and aesthetician. During the course, we will study cummings' complete poetic corpus (of almost 1000 poems), one of his novels, The Enormous Room, one of his plays, Him, and some of his criticism, as he delivers it orally in his famous Charles Eliot Norton (non-) lectures. For his life, we will read Richard Kennedy's biography of cummings, Dreams in the Mirror. For his visual art and aesthetics, we will read Milton Cohen's Poet and Painter, which explores cummings' sketches, painting, and artistic ideas. Requirements for the course will be two medium length papers (5-10 pages) during the term and one longer paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 William Faulkner/ Robert Hayden.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The largest portion of the syllabus for this course will be given to William Faulkner, whose fiction has exerted a powerful influence on writers around the world. Likely texts are two of his most experimental and highly-orchestrated novels The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom and two of his most controversial popular works Light in August and The Hamlet (the first volume of the Snopes trilogy), as well as several short stories. Robert Hayden's Collected Poems investigates some of the same history that Faulkner scrutinizes, but from an African-American perspective. Together the two authors carry forward themes central to American literature in the 20th century: region and nation, modern sexuality, racial and class identity. At the same time we shall consider questions of career-formation and canonization in these exemplary cases.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

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ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Doing Things with Theory.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dwthomas/484_ft02.htm

This course asks about theory as a form of action. Is theory an entertaining but inconsequential meddling in cultural habits and values? Or does it clarify who we are and how we might do well to act? Many who ask such questions hope to establish whether politicized theoretical approaches from Marxism and feminism to queer theory and multiculturalism constitute forms of activism. But a still more fundamental question lies in our way: how can theory affect our ways of thinking and guide our ways of acting? This course spotlights desires and assumptions that underwrite key modern theoretical arguments in order to illuminate our own motives in theorizing about literature.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This colloquium is limited to students already enrolled in the English Honors Program who intend to complete Honors theses in Winter 2003. Through a series of intensive discussions and exercises, we'll explore strategies and methods for working through every aspect of the thesis project: refining research areas, working with advisors, choosing and using secondary materials, and drafting and re-drafting for the most effective argument and prose. Our format will be that of a workshop, in which we circulate work continuously over the course of the term; each student should end the term with a workable draft of the thesis project.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an honors thesis your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

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ENGLISH 501 / GERMAN 501. Old English.

Section 001 Meets with English 407.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. You will also develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 516. Literary Research and the Computer.

Section 001 Research and Technology in the Humanities. Meets with English 415.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf02/415f02syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., websites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impact of technology. By the middle of the semester, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Prospective students may want to look at the course website for the last offering of this course, located at http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html or click the link from Professor Rabkin's homepage http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin.

Probably the most pertinent and interesting point on this site to check is the "Class Roster & Projects" page and the syllabus itself. Further queries can be addressed to Professor Rabkin, preferably by e-mail but also by phone or during his office hours. Check with the receptionist for contact information.

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ENGLISH 520. Introduction to Graduate Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English or Women's Studies and permission of instructor. (3). A required course for first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies graduate students only.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce first-year Ph.D. students to the forms of research, writing, and interpretation typical of graduate-level literary study and to the academic profession more generally. Through a combination of workshops, exercises, selected readings, and class discussions, we will assemble a toolkit of research methodologies, writing and speaking skills, and critical perspectives that should be broadly applicable in both subsequent courses and the dissertation-writing process. We will spend some time exploring the specific conventions and protocols of academic life, but we will also strive for a larger view, in which we consider the challenges and opportunities the profession can provide and its problematic status in contemporary society.

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ENGLISH 521. History of Literary Theory.

Section 001 Doing Things with Theory: History of Criticism and Theory.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dwthomas/521_ft02.htm

Covering dozens of writers from Greek antiquity to the present day, this course can function as a general survey of literary criticism and theory. Throughout the term, however, we will be pursuing the more specific goal of clarifying how theory bears on the current work of literary scholars. Two professional facts make this goal urgent for all of us: (1) we establish the credibility of our own writing by articulating our theoretical commitments with clarity and conviction; and (2) as job candidates and colleagues, we can better engage people working in areas different than our own by drawing on a broad knowledge of theory and criticism.

We proceed in something like reverse-chronological order:

Part I: We examine several current "fields" of critical writing to gain early orientation in the idioms and styles employed today.

Part II: We look further back to an array of post-Enlightenment problems and ideas that are commonly presupposed in current critical conversation.

Part III: We read arguments in Plato and Aristotle that inform most of Western literary study.

Part IV: We take up the question of formalism, which has a powerful but vexed currency in literary study.

Part V: We conclude by reading two contemporary book-length arguments. John Plotz' The Crowd lets us examine a writer's recourse to theory in a periodizing context. Such an example seems useful for our purposes, because invoking theory in an historical context will be the task confronting most of you in your dissertation work. We conclude the term with Steven Knapp's Literary Interest, a sophisticated recent theoretical argument about the status of "the literary."

Coursework: full reading and active participation; weekly one-page summaries; take-home examinations. I do not ask for a term paper, but students who feel they should attempt such a project should speak with me.

Texts: Some coursepack items are at Accu-Copy; books are at Shaman Drum:

The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. Ed. Vincent B. Leitch et al. New York and London: Norton, 2001.

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ENGLISH 526. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 Hybridities: Collaborative Investigations of the Verbal and the Visual Image. (3 credits). Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.001, Art and Design 600.002, and English 526.001.

Instructor(s): Linda K. Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu), Edward West (ewest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

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ENGLISH 549. Contemporary Literature.

Section 001 Some Forms of Contemporary Fiction.

Instructor(s): Charles M Baxter

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This will be a course in which we'll read and discuss some recent novels that present interesting formal properties or conditions to the reader. The discussions will, I hope, prove to be useful for practicing writers of fiction, but the seminar should not be seen to be limited to them alone. I am interested in a number of different matters, including (tonally) irony and its discontents, and other technical or formal features, such as effaced narrators, counterpointed narratives, collage and vignette-accumulations, obsessive voicings vs. improvisatory indirection, and texts with photographs, or texts that are, themselves, photographic in some manner. I am interested also in stories and novels that are slightly off the beaten track. Some of the writers whose work we may study would include Evan Connell, W.G.. Sebald, Elizabeth Hardwich, James Salter, Toni Morrison, Angela Carter, Lydia Davis, Donald Barthelme, Wright Morris, William Maxwell, and Paula Fox.

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ENGLISH 553. Twentieth-Century American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will set multi-ethnic modernist fiction in the context of emergent U.S. modernity, from pre-World War I views of U.S. imperialism to 1930s and 40s depictions of racialized labor. We will discuss modernist fiction in relation to U.S. modernity as defined by a set of international encounters. This view of American modernism underscores diasporic writings by African-American, Jewish, Latino/a, and Asian American writers engaged in critiques of U.S. nationalism and internationalism. Authors under primary scrutiny will include José Martí, H.L. Mencken, W.E.B. Du Bois, Jean Toomer, Claude McKay, C.L.R. James, Zora Neale Hurston, Gertrude Stein, Henry Roth, Américo Paredes, and Carlos Bulosan.

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ENGLISH 569. Writing Workshop in Creative Non-Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Lynch

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The traffic between poetry and prose is one that interests me and informs the workshop in non-fiction. Both creative non-fiction and poetry require a powerful sense of voice and rely on language to manage the wide range of subjects that may be addressed in either a poem or an essay. Accordingly members of the workshop will read and discuss poems as a way to understand the thematic, imaginative, and structural range of the personal essay. Montaigne's dictum, that "in every man is the whole of man's estate," is the organizing principle of the workshop. In order to better understand humanity, we must examine humans, through language, which seems among humankind's defining gifts. Writing requirements will include three non-fiction projects one thousand words, two thousand words, and three thousand words. There will be two required and several suggested texts. Admission to this course is by writing sample only. All who are interested in 569.001 should submit a writing sample to Jan Burgess.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 570. Research in Composition.

Section 001 Teaching Writing: Introduction to Composition Studies. Meets with Education 621.001.

Instructor(s): Anne Ruggles Gere (argere@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/570/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to Composition Studies, a capacious and interdisciplinary field that has its roots in pedagogy. Accordingly, we will focus on the teaching of writing, beginning with our own experiences as writers, the writing of our students, and the relationship between what we do as readers and writers. This course will consider questions such as: "What can our own literacy narratives tell us about processes of writing and learning to write?" "How do race, gender and class figure in these processes?" "What is good writing?" "What considerations of value shape our thinking about the quality of writing?" "How can the history of composition studies, both inside and outside the academy, inform our teaching?" "How does composition studies situate itself in the academy?" "What do critical theorists have to say to composition teachers and vice versa?" We will look to our own experiences as students and as teachers; to theorists from the Classical period forward; and to contemporary writers as we explore these and related questions.

Because students typically bring a wide variety of experiences and interests to the course, there will be considerable opportunity for self-directed reading along with common course materials. Course requirements will include one long paper, several shorter ones, and a class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A workshop course in the nature and technique of prose fiction - both short and long. There will be readings assigned and close analysis of submitted work; classroom attendance and participation is mandatory. Each student is expected to produce a minimum of 10,000 words.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The graduate fiction workshop is a studio course, designed to help MFA writers further develop their art and refine their aesthetics. As workshop writers present fiction-in-progress, we'll discuss issues of form the slippery and changing shapes of fiction, what is formally possible in a given work and the linked questions of architecture, narration and point of view, character, voice, language, image, music, etc. What role does lyricism play? How do we represent various experiences of time? In what ways do we envision and construct character, relationship, place? Which conventions are most interesting to explore the limits of, to reinvent, to ignore? How might we think about the relationships between fiction writing and other arts? Between our experiences of culture/cultural moments, the ways in which we tell stories, and the stories we tell? Throughout the term, graduate writers will produce and present new fiction, complete brief assigned projects, and read and respond to both fiction by workshop members and contemporary published work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It will be our business to become an adaptable and rigorous critical readership for one another's work-in-progress. We will use the workshop as an occasion to broaden formal and thematic range, to refine editorial skills, to share questions, enthusiasms, and generous skepticisms. Our primary focus will be on new work submitted by the members of the class, but we will also read selected work by other poets, generally contemporaries in mid-career.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 001 Postcolonial Pacific Literature. Meets with American Culture 699.005.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides graduate students with an opportunity to read and analyze contemporary literature in English from the Pacific region, with special focus on writers from Hawaii, Samoa, New Zealand, Fiji, and Australia. We will be reading recent fiction by Keri Hulme, Patricia Grace, Witi Ihimaera, Alan Duff, Leialoha Apo Perkins, Joseph Puna Balaz, Michael McPherson, Epeli Hau'ofa, Sia Figiel, Colin Johnson, Satendra Nandan, Sudesh Mishra, and Albert Wendt, among others. One of the central concerns of the course will be what some have taken to be the "influence" or translation of certain postcolonial aesthetics from the literatures from Latin America and India. In addition to examining historical and ethnographic accounts of these locales, we also will be looking closely at the aesthetic politics of works by these writers in conjunction with theories of colonialism, indigeneity, and postcoloniality. Requirements are two oral presentations and one 25-page essay due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 635. Topics in Poetry.

Section 001 Renaissance Poetry.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read a wide variety of poetry, largely lyric, from Wyatt and Surrey in the early sixteenth century through Milton, Dryden, and Katherine Philips in the later seventeenth century. We will work to situate poems amid the careers and the historical situations of their authors, but we will aspire to keep questions of form and genre well in our sights. Why, we will ask, might a writer choose to articulate desire in formally patterned language? Is literary form the necessary vehicle, or the constricting straitjacket, of desire? How do issues of class and gender mark lyric utterance? How does the imagined audience of a poem alter its expression and meaning? Is there a politics of lyric form in the early modern period?

Requirements include attendance, participation, one short paper (4-6 pages), one longer paper (8-12), and two in-class reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 641. Topics in the Medieval Period.

Section 001 Representing Christianity, Judaism and Islam.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Anti-Judaic and anti-Islamic polemics accompany the preaching of the First Crusade in 1096, and violent action against Jews and Moslems follows the violent words. Narratives of violence and dangerous images of Jews and Moslems become naturalized in the centuries leading up to the Reformation indeed, such representations become central to the formation of national and religious identity.

This course will investigate diverse representations of Judaism and Islam in this period and inquire into the cultural work they accomplish. Primary texts will likely include literature of the Crusades (sermons, romances, monastic polemics), travel literature (Mandeville's Travels), selections from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (probably the Prioress' Tale), drama (the plays of the Digby manuscript The Conversion of Saint Paul and Mary Magdalene and the Croxton Play of the Sacrament). We will conclude by examining Martin Luther's contributions to polemical traditions. As we proceed through these texts, we will focus particularly on narratives of contact and conversion, and on dominant myths and stereotypes. Secondary texts will include recent historicist scholarship, including work by Rubin, Funkenstein, Signer, Greenblatt, Cohen, Fradenburg, Patterson, and Metlitzki.

Many of the primary texts on this syllabus invite consideration of manuscript and print incarnations: How, for instance, was the Prioress' antisemitism received in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries? To explore these issues, we will spend some time with manuscript and print versions in the Rare Book Room. Written assignments will include common academic tasks: a book review; a short analysis of a manuscript or pint version of a text; a description, syllabus and teaching statement for an undergraduate course; and an annotated bibliography and grant application for projected research in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 646. Topics in the Romantic Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with texts central to Enlightenment thought and to the two principal critiques of that thought, one contemporary with Enlightenment (i.e., Romanticism) and one from the 20th century (i.e., materialist and poststructuralist critique). To establish some tenets and traditions of Enlightenment, we will read texts from the work of Bacon, Locke, Descartes, Paine, Kant, and others; Romantic texts will be drawn from the work of Hegel, Burke, Fichte, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Blake, Byron, and Shelley. The third grouping materialist and poststructuralist theory will include Marx, Freud, Horkheimer/Adorno, Foucault, Deleuze, and others. By end of term, students should be able to identify positions and implied commitments in the readings and arguments they encounter in the critical and cultural studies of their own time. The formal dimensions of critical thought (e.g., poetry vs. philosophy, manifesto vs. treatise) will also be considered. Class presentations are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 668. Studies in American Authors.

Section 001 Tales of the Market: Some American Fictions 1890-1925. Meets with American Culture 699.003.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll read a number of novels and stories that take as their subject, or reflect in their method, changes in the US economic life and its concomitant rearrangements on the planes of gender, ethnicity, and race. Texts will include, James, The Golden Bowl; Howells, Aazard of New Fortunes; Dreiser, Sister Carrie; Wharton, The House of Mirth; Norris, The Pit (or perhaps The Octopus); Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Cahan, The Rise of David Levinsky. We'll also be watching some early films (e.g. Griffith, The Musketeers of Pig Alley) and reading some secondary texts, both critical and historical in nature

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 695. Pedagogy: Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Curzan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies gradaute students. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide guidance, support, and advice as you begin your teaching career at the University of Michigan a challenging and exciting experience that can also be nerve-wracking for all but the most experienced instructors. The course aims to address both the practical questions that come with teaching and some of the broader theoretical issues involved in course design; our discussions should also help you develop a set of strategies for reflecting on your own development and practices as a teacher, now and in terms to come. Throughout the term, the course will focus on many of the practical concerns of being a graduate student instructor: facilitating discussion, grading, negotiating your relationship with students and with professors, controlling your time, etc. These discussions will be complemented by selected readings from some of the thoughtful published material on teaching, often specifically within an English department. The second half of the course will turn more to issues of course goals and syllabus design (including specific writing assignments) to help you prepare for teaching 124 the following year. In addition, I will make regular visits to your classrooms so that I can give you specific feedback on your own strengths and weaknesses as well as the kinds of student interactions I can observe within the context of your class. One key to good teaching is collaboration, and in this course we will work together to talk through pedagogical questions and concerns, including how to apply pedagogical theory. Our weekly meetings as a community of professional teachers will be a forum where you can share teaching worries and successes, learn from each other's experiences, and develop pedagogical strategies and skills that will guide you throughout your teaching career.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 802. Seminar: English Language.

Section 001 The Revolution in the English Language, 1476-1776.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/english/802/001.nsf

The cultural transformations of the renaissance and the long eighteenth century included major changes in the language. Britain went from a cultural backwater to a colonial power; complaints about the shortcomings of English were replaced by a growing sense of its glory. An oral society gave way to a literate one. Literary expression found an Anglo-American voice in a language vastly enhanced by borrowings from other languages, and the core system of English its pronunciation and grammar was transformed.

Cultural studies has broadened our perspectives on literature, and new methods of accessing the past gives richness to our scholarship. English 802 is a course in three centuries of the history of English, but it will also introduce students to the use of electronic databases, websites, and other "new" foundations for our discipline. It will be collaborative, hands-on, and fun.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 821. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 Poststructuralism and Postcolonial Theory.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The fields of poststructuralism and postcolonial theory represent two of the most powerful developments in literary discourse in the last four decades, yet the relationship between them has been complex and contested. In this seminar we will be charting an alternative history and theory of these two movements and the intimate connection between them. Our operative premise is a tantalizing claim made by Robert Young in White Mythologies: "If 'so-called poststructuralism' is the product of a single historical moment, then that moment is probably not May 1968 [the year of the student revolts in Europe] but rather the Algerian War of Independence no doubt itself both a symptom and a product." We will try to examine the historical and theoretical connections between the colonial event (and its literature) and the variety of theories that go under the rubric of poststructuralism and postcolonialism, most notably deconstruction and deconstructive feminism. Is it accidental that the central figures in these movements (Derrida and Cixous) were born in Algeria, France's most prominent colony? Did a surreptitious critique of colonialism enable poststructuralism? What kind of theoretical and critical opening did postructuralism provide postcolonial writers, intellectuals, and critics? How have both movements transformed the nature of literature and its institutions of interpretation? And why have poststructuralism and postcolonial theory, despised or treated with suspicion in other disciplines, found sanctuary in literary and cultural studies?

In order to respond to these questions adequately, we will reject the tendency to see both poststructuralism and postcolonial theory as the study of either marginalized communities or cult figures. Instead we will look at both movements as a series of theoretical adventures driven by a cluster of questions whose primary goal has been to question some of the dominant concepts within the Western tradition while still embedded in its institutions of interpretation. In order to open poststructuralism and postcolonial theory to the kind of reinterpretation that will account for their influence in literary studies, we will take the foundational terms of the "posts" (colonialism and structuralism) as serious conceptual categories rather than mere labels. While the seminar will focus on the key theoretical texts in poststructuralism and postcolonial theory, we will pay particular attention to the "minor" and "hidden" discourses of this tradition such as Derrida's and Cixous' writings on race and Africa, Homi Bhabha's "lost" essay on V. S. Naipaul, and Gayarti Spivak's work in Marxism and feminism.

The seminar will start with a consideration of the relationship between phenomenology and the discourse of colonialism (Sartre, Memmi, Fanon, and Cesaire). It will then focus on the issues involved in the explosive debate between Sartre and Lévi-Strauss on history and historicism and the latter's deployment of difference in the consolidation of structuralism. We will then turn to the figures of Derrida and Cixous and their critiques of Western metaphysics (either as "white mythology" or "pallocentricism"), which we will try to connect to their (post) colonial essays. Finally, we will explore how these debates led to the emergence of postcolonial theory and its radical rethinking of the nature of literature (especially English literature) and its criticism. Because this is a seminar in critical theory, we will be reading a good chunk of theoretical essays and chapters of books. But we will also read four fictional works that have been central to the emergence of postcolonial theory: Jean Rhy's The Wide Sargasso Sea, Chinua Achebe's Arrow of God, Anita Desai's Baumgartner's Bombay, and Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses. Requirements for the seminar include active participation in class, a presentation, and a research/critical paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 Modernism and the Material Text: Yeats, Pound, and Moore.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study three major modernist writers W. B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, and Marianne Moore from a variety of perspectives normally kept discrete. Among them will be a construction of the text as a material object (editorial theory and bibliographic coding), as an historical object (at once political and postcolonial), and as an aesthetic object (both formalism and its alternatives). I hope that we will explore not only those various approaches but also a range of interrelations between them, by which modernism appears more as a process than a product, more as a shifting series of improvisations than as a fixed monument, and more as historically contingent than as ahistorical. For each writer we will begin with a week's overview and then concentrate on in-depth study of a major work: probably Yeat's Tower volume, Pound's Cantos, and Moore's Observations volume. The seminar will emphasize discussion, and will include both oral reports and preparation of a final seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 851. Seminar: American Literature.

Section 001 Documenting America: Realism, Photography, Modernity. Meets with American Culture 801.001

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the nature, literary and visual strategies, and cultural politics of the 'documentary.' More specifically, we'll examine the aesthetics of realism and authenticity in contexts in which they've been instrumental to the making of a national culture (the immigration era, the red thirties, postwar liberalism, identitarian postmodernity). Toward that end, we'll be looking at linked bodies of literary narrative and photographic images, spanning the 1980s to the present: Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine, William Dean Howells, Abraham Cahan, and Henry James; the WPA archive, New Deal and immigrant writing and noir modernism; collaborations across color lines (including Ralph Ellison/Aaron Siskind and James Baldwin/Richard Avedon); narratives by Gish Jen and Bharati Mukherjee and postmodernist documentary work by Dawoud Bey and Nikki S. Lee. A working acquaintance with visual culture studies is welcome but not at all required; among our critical guides to the question of how to frame relations between image and narrative, aesthetics and politics, narrative and history, will be Alan Trachtenberg, Maren Strange, bell hooks, Nathan Natanson, and Roland Barthes. Throughout, a central aim of the course will be to rethink key categories of cultural analysis 'modernism,' 'modernity,' 'realism,' with respect to the exigencies of US culture and experience. Requirements will be appropriate to the logic of a seminar, including intensive reading and participation; in class discussion leading; a culminating seminar essay or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Smith Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor (keitay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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