College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 7:25 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


GERMAN 401 / HISTORY 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas and cultural movements will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

No prerequisites. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a midterm exam, several short quiz and take-home assignments, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 – Twenthieth Century German Architecture. Meets with Architecture 503.025.

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the built environment of modern Germany through a series of key case studies focussing upon the interrelations of architecture, design, urbanism, and politics. Beginning with rapid German industrialization and urbanization at the end of the nineteenth century, we will consider the responses of the German Werkbund , Peter Behrens, and the Bauhaus to the new social and cultural realities of modern technology. The rich architectural legacy of the Weimar Republic, especially the Berlin projects of Mies van der Rohe, Bruno Taut, Erich Mendelsohn, and Hans Poelzig, will be explored in relation to the analyses of urban culture articulated by Walter Benjamin and Siegfried Kracauer. National Socialist architectural plans and spatial ideologies (Albert Speer, the concentration camp, the Autobahn ) will then be followed by a consideration of postwar urban reconstruction philosophies in the two Germanies. Modernism (Frei Otto, Gunter Behnisch) as the architectural legitimation of state power will be proposed as a defining feature of modern German identity. We will conclude with an analysis of recent architectural and urban developments in Berlin (the masterplan of Axel Schultes, Norman Foster's Reichstag , Daniel Libeskind's Jewish Museum, Peter Eisenman's Holocaust Memorial) in that context of that city's newly emerging role as national capital and global center. Lectures, discussions, readings, films. Course requirements include regular attendance and participation, midterm examination, oral report, and final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth-Century German Fiction.

Section 001 – German Modernism and the Crisis of Vision.

Instructor(s): Julia C Hell

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this advanced undergraduate course is twofold: 1) to improve students' language skills, in particular their reading and speaking skills; and 2) to familiarize ourselves with a core issue of German cultural life in the 20th century, the relationship between literature and vision, or visuality. The course rests on two assumptions; 1) literature reflects and establishes different ways of seeing; 2) we can link these different ways of seeing to changes within German society. To pursue this link between text, vision, and social transformation, we will read short literary texts (from the 1890s to the present, with particular emphasis on the 1910s, the immediate post-WWII era, and post-unification Germany); in addition, we will also read scholarly articles discssing questions such as "objective" versus "subjective" vision, voyeurism, or the disturbance of vision that characterizes many 20th century texts. We will read the literary texts in German, most of the scholarly texts in English.

This course is designed with the active participation of students in mind. That means, for instance, that students will regularly be asked to present the assigned readings in class. There will be one take-home exam and one in-class exam; in addition, students will write a short paper at the end of the term on a topic of their choice Some of the writing will be in English, all in-class discussions in German. If you have any questions about the course, please contact me at: hell@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 465 / MEMS 475 / HISTORY 485. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Marriage is one of the most central institutions in human societies. Contrary to previous generations, however, today we are beginning to look upon marriage as an institution subject to historic change. In the union of husband and wife gender relations are defined, reenacted and, at the same time, constantly reconstructed. But how was the female sphere defined in the fifteenth century? Did the Reformation affect society's understanding of matrimony? What was married life like in a world where two out of four children were likely to die? Where, and when, do we encounter love-matches? We will explore marriage discourse and policies in a culturally well-defined context, Western Europe, especially the German-speaking countries between ca. 1350 and 1600. By examining the depiction of marriage in literature and art of the age we will come to a more complex understanding of what marriage was supposed to be and what it really meant. This course will be of interest to German, History, MARC, and Women's Studies concentrators. No German required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall Term of their senior year, preferably – but not necessarily – as early as Winter Term of their sophomore year. German 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall Term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

Organizational Meeting: Thursday, September 5, 4:00 p.m., 3117 MLB

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 501 / ENGLISH 501. Old English.

Section 001 – Meets with English 407.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 506. Seminar in the Structure of Modern German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 415. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We shall begin our study of the structure of German with an overview of German phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon. While we shall consider various theoretical frameworks, it is not our goal to single out any one of those frameworks for special attention or elaboration; our primary focus will be on the data themselves. We shall then proceed to important current issues, such as the relative status of standard and non-standard varieties of German, the social and political ramifications of standard ideology, variation vs. constancy, the role of language in inclusion/exclusion, oral vs. written usage, and strategies of discourse and narration. English-German structural contrasts will be noted where appropriate, as well as some of the more general aspects of first and second language acquisition.

The course is intended primarily for graduate students, but advanced undergraduates are welcome. Readings will be assigned from Anthony Fox, The Structure of German, and a course pack. In addition to the readings, students will have homework problems and will give a several mini-reports on topics of interest. Students may choose to write a term-paper or take a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 517 / LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

German 531 is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings will be primarily in English; class discussion will be in German and English.

This course is intended to provide the theoretical and practical foundations for the teaching of German as a foreign language in schools and colleges. The course will combine regular reading assignments with frequent class observations and the preparation of sample lessons in order to generate a fruitful interplay between theory and practice. There will also be a strong emphasis on introducing students to relevant instructional technology. Course requirements include regular reading assignments, regular class observations, several short presentations, quizzes, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 540. Introduction to German Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia C Hell

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

German Studies, defined by its heterogeneity rather than by any single approach or unified object of exploration, has been the subject of animated debate over the last decades. This introductory course will begin with a (brief) discussion of the most recent contributions to the question What is German Studies? In the second part, we will study some of the most important theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies, focusing on questions of culture and ideology. In the third part, we will discuss several books/articles in the fields of literary and historical studies, studies in gender and sexuality, social and political thought, visual arts and popular culture, seeking to gain an overview of the seminal work done in German Studies over the last decades. Finally, we will take stock of the critical debate surrounding (German) Cultural Studies and ideally construct a preliminary working model of German Studies.

Requirements: two seminar papers of about 10 pages each. One of these papers should be devoted to a critical reading of one of the texts in section 2 or 3; the other should sketch a specific project in German Studies. The last session of the term will be organized as a round-table discussion of that second set of papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 752. Studies in Literary Theory.

Section 001 – Theory of Tragedy. Meets with Comparative Literature 780.001.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The theory of tragedy has been at the center of debates in the history of aesthetics and literary theory ever since Plato's critique of tragedy in the Republic and Aristotle's response in the Poetics. Readings in this history will lead us to consider tragedy in juxtaposition with questions of form and genre, history, affect, politics, literary evaluation, antiquity and modernity, and philosophy. Readings will include excerpts from the Republic , the Poetics , Hölderlin's translation of Oedipus the King and Antigone as well as his annotations to these translations, excerpts from Schelling, Hegel, and Benjamin, reflections by Karl Jaspers, Peter Szondi, and Seth Benardete, as well as supplementary readings to be determined at the beginning of class according to the interests and expertise of the participants. Students planning to enroll should read as many tragedies as possible in preparation for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 – European Cultural History. Meets with History 641.002.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 641.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 – Bertolt Brecht and Film. Meets with Film & Video 600.001.

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider the work of Bertolt Brecht and its complex relation to cinema history, theory, and practice. We begin with an intensive reading of Brecht's plays and theoretical texts with the goal of identifying their principal aesthetic and political strategies (non-Aristotelian dramatic structure, alienation effects, reflexivity) as well as their recent reception by contemporary critics such as Fredric Jameson. Those films produced during the Weimar Republic (The Three Penny Opera, Kuhle Wampe) commonly understood in relation to Brecht's cultural politics will be read in relation both to his explicit theorization of cinema as well as the analyses of the culture industry conducted by Theodor Adorno, Max Horkheimer, and Siegfried Kracauer. Brecht's experience of Californian exile and contribution to 'Hangmen Also Die' will be studied as paradigmatic of his attitudes toward America and Hollywood cinema. His return to the German Democratic Republic and his impact upon its cinema will also be considered. We will then examine the rediscovery of Brecht's work by radical filmmakers across the world during the 1960s such as Jean-Luc Godard, Oshima Nagisa, Jean-Marie Straub, Peter Watkins, and Jon Jost. The course will conclude by studying the recent installation in Guadlajara, Mexico by multimedia artist Krzystof Wodiczko as a test case for the relevance of Brechtian practice in the age of digital technology and globalization. Course requirements include regular attendance and participation, seminar presentations, and final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 841. Seminar: Studies in German Literature.

Section 001 – Wunderkammer: Collecting and Exhibiting. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Vanessa Helen Agnew

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Popular in the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Wunderkammer or 'curiosity cabinet' was the precursor of the modern museum. This 'world in a box' was a repository for the rare, exotic, ingenious and wondrous. Filled with items ranging from anatomical preserving jars, botanical specimens and mechanical devices to miniatures, musical instruments, anamorphic art, ethnographic objects, gems and coin collections, its purpose was to comprehend and display the world in all its manifold complexity and marvelousness.

As an object of artificial and natural wonder, presented in the form of a 'theater of the universe', the Wunderkammer raises questions about the relationship between visual aesthetics and epistemology: how was knowledge generated through organization, categorization and display? The Wunderkammer allows us to explore notions such as curiosity, rarity, wonder, memory, artifice and exoticism and to examine the intersection between scientific and commercial exploration and colonial endeavors. We will find that the Wunderkammer was a transitional mode between the private and the public, the domestic and exotic, the sacred and secular, the natural and the artificial, the awe-inspiring and analytic. By the nineteenth century, the early modern category of indiscriminate 'wonder' had given way to analysis, experimentation and disciplinary specialization. In place of the Wunderkammer were new modes of displaying objects and categorizing human beings and their productions.

The seminar will examine renown examples of the Wunderkammer , for example, Albert Seba's Die deutsche Apotheke (‘The German Apothecary'), a vast natural historical collection sold to Peter the Great in 1716. Further, we will look at famous explorers such as the Forsters and Humboldt who collected in the South Pacific and South America, as well as curators and theorists of the Wunderkammer, such as Quicchelberg, and natural history illustrators such as Merian. In conclusion, we will examine the extent to which contemporary practices of collecting and exhibiting bear traces of the earlier Wunderkammer . Looking at the random connectivity of the Internet and at contemporary museums, exhibitions and installations such von Hagen's Körperwelten (http://www.koerperwelten.com/en/aktuelle.htm), the Getty Museum's Devices of Wonder (http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/devices/flash) Wilson's Museum of Jurassic Technology (http://www.mjt.org) and Guyton's Heidelberg Project (http://www.heidelberg.org) , we will investigate the juxtaposition of the disparate with the ahistoric, curious and autoptic, and reflect on the implications of this for present day modes of apprehending the world.

Included on the syllabus will be readings on travel, collecting and natural history by Burke, Chamisso, Chatwin, Ehrenberg, G. and J. R. Forster, Freud, Gmelin, Humboldt, Linnaeus, Nabokov, Pliny, Quicchelberg, Rumphius and Seba. Theoretical texts will focus on curiosity, wonder, collecting, categorization, colonialism, cross-cultural contact, performance and museology and include works by Barringer, Benjamin, Butler, Darnton, Dening, Ecker, Elsner, Foucault, Greenblatt, Impey, Kaeppler, MacGregor, Pearce, Stafford, Terpak and Thomas.

While this interdisciplinary seminar will concentrate on German sources, comparisons will be drawn with British, French, Dutch, Italian, Spanish and Russian contexts, as well as with non-European practices of collecting and exhibiting. Readings and discussions will be in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 901. Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For degree candidates who have completed course requirements and who need supplementary work. Under supervision of graduate committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a one week orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


Page


This page was created at 7:25 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2002 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.