College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2002 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 7:26 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


HISTORY 404. The Later Roman Empire.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 – The Roman Empire of Constantine & Julian.

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Constantine was the first Christian emperor in the Roman empire; his nephew Julian was the last pagan emperor. This course is an analysis of Roman society during the later third and fourth centuries. Topics to be discussed include the near failure of the Roman empire in the third century, the role of Christianity, Constantine's patronage for Christianity, the role of classical culture in an increasingly Christian society, and Julian's promotion of pagan cults.

Readings will consist of translations of ancient texts, including the writings of Lactantius, Eusebius, Constantine, Ammianus, Julian, and Libanius, as well as modern scholarship about the period. All classes will be discussions of the reading material. Requirements include three papers based on the readings and discussions, and pariticipation in all discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

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HISTORY 416 / GERMAN 401. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 401.001.

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HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since medieval times, Europeans have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, the reign of Ivan the Terrible, and the transformation of Muscovy in the seventeenth century.

Early Russian history poses particular intellectual challenges. The history of this period is not only completely unfamiliar to most people today, but is also complicated by the unreliability of the source record. Imagine trying to make sense of American history if the authenticity of the Constitution were uncertain and scholars were divided about whether or not the Civil War actually took place. This is the degree of uncertainty that plagues the history of early Russia and makes its study exceptionally exciting and interesting. Each student has the opportunity to contribute original insights and to participate in clarifying the opaque record by filling in some of the blanks. This course allows students to experience the joys of original interpretation and research in a field where the answers are still unknown.

REQUIREMENTS:

  • Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
  • Midterm: in class.
  • 7-8 page paper on a primary source
  • Take-Home Final Exam, distributed on Friday April 13, at my office; due Thursday April 19 at my office, by 3:30 p.m. The exam will require approximately 8 pages of writing, typed, double-spaced.
  • Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

There are no prerequisites.

TENTATIVE READINGS:
(Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street)
1)Bushkovitch, Paul, Peter the Great
2)Halperin, Charles J., Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1985).
3) Skrynnikov, Ruslan G., Ivan the Terrible (Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International Press).
4)Platonov, S. F., The Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis and Social Struggle in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, trans. by John T. Alexander (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1970).
5)Pouncy, Carolyn, The Domostroi: Rules for Russian Households in the Time of Ivan the Terrible (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).
6)Riasanovsky, Nicholas, A History of Russia, (any edition)., Oxford. (expensive text book, but should be available in used copies for more reasonable prices).
7)Zenkovsky, Serge A., Medieval Russia's Epics, Chronicles and Tales, revised and enlarged ed. (NY: Dutton, 1974).

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HISTORY 433. Russia Under the Tsars: From Peter the Great to the Revolutions of 1917.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elena Campbell

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This survey of Imperial Russia examines the political, social, cultural and intellectual history of Russia under the Romanovs, from Peter the Great to Nicholas II. It will focus, among other issues, on the complexity of an empire that included large numbers of non-Russian and non-Christian subjects, the problems of industrial development in an overwhelmingly agrarian society, and the emergence of one of Europe's most sophisticated literary cultures in a country where the vast majority was illiterate. The instructor, Elena Campbell, is visiting from the European University of St. Petersburg.

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HISTORY 442 / AAPTIS 461. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu), Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 461.001.

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HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major theme of this course will be "modernization" of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand,Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) – a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources.

The emphasis, in the fall academic term, will be on the colonial period, 1870-1945. Students, in the next academic term, can choose to take a sequel to the course, which will deal with the period of post-colonialism and of independent Southeast Asian states since the Second World War to the present. Individual students' interest in particular region and period will be fully supported.

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HISTORY 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster

Prerequisites: HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

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HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – American Business History. Meets with History 569.001

Instructor(s): David Lewis (lewisdl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/lhc/412/001.nsf

An undergraduate course offered by Prof. David Lewis since 1966, "American Business History" surveys the American scene and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events. In addition to subject matter, the course is sprinkled with insights and philosophy of the Business School's most venerable, yet young-at-heart, professor, who was rated five stars by his students the last time he taught the course in Winter 2000.

Coursepack. No text.

Must have Junior or Senior standing. Meets with History 569/LHC 412.

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HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – Latin America: The Colonial Period. Meets with History 347.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/347/001.nsf

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of multiethnic societies in the Americas by studying the indigenous background to conquest as well as the nature of the settler communities, and the development of plantation slavery, village life, and colonial cities. We analyze overlapping structures of class, race, gender, and ethnicity, and examine the complex processes by which identities were assigned and assumed. Using primary sources, we examine the patterns of belief and the ideas of honor that shaped the lives of men and women. Finally, we ask what permitted the survival of these colonial structures for over three hundred years, what factors eventually led to the collapse of the colonial system, and what legacies were left behind as the nations of Latin America achieved formal independence.

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HISTORY 485 / GERMAN 465 / MEMS 475. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 465.001.

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HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 001 – Law Slavery Freedom: US & Latin America.

Instructor(s): Martha S Jones, Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/498/001.nsf

This course will focus on the linkages between slavery and systems of law. We will look both at the legal structures that accompany the holding of property in human beings, and at the experiences of slaves in the courts. Using evidence from both Latin America and the United States, and looking at legislation and transcripts of cases, we will ask how and when slaves themselves were able to use the legal system, and then how freed people were incorporated in legal culture. The readings will include case transcripts, secondary accounts, and some transcribed archival documents, as well as several interpretive works.

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HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

Other History Courses

Section 002 – Race & Empire in Victorian Britain.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/498/002.nsf

The central premise of this course is that empire is not just something that happens overseas, but also at home. Both domestic and overseas developments in the British empire are the foci of this course, as we explore, whether indeed, as one Victorian writer put it, 'race [was] everything'.

The course approaches this enormous topic in two ways: episodically, and thematically. Themes that will be addressed include the rise of the discipline of anthropology, evolution and empire, racial ideas and Christianity, the abolition of slavery, and the popular culture of empire. Episodes that will be studied include the 'Jamaica Uprising' of 1865, the New Zealand Wars, Darwinism, the Indian Mutiny-Rebellion, Victorian explorers, and the Boer War.

By the end of the course students will have a sense of the considerable variety of concerns and ideas that shaped Victorian ideas and practices about race and empire. Students will also have a foundational understanding of the Victorian British Empire, some of its problems, and some of its consequences both at home and overseas. They will also be able to critically trace different strands in the development of Victorian racial ideas and the practices of race.

Prior knowledge of Victorian Britain and/or the British empire is not required.

The course will be run as a weekly seminar, and emphasis will be given to taking part in, and leading, discussion. Assessment will be based on: two papers (7-9pp), weekly written responses to readings, a short book review, participation in class discussions, and a final take-home exam. Class attendance is mandatory, and repeated unexcused absences will result in a grade reduction.

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HISTORY 531 / AAPTIS 587. Studies in Pahlavi and Middle Persian.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 587.001.

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HISTORY 569 / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – Meets with History 468.001.

Instructor(s): David Lewis (lewisdl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/lhc/412/001.nsf

See History 468.001.

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HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 – The Performing Arts in Brazil: Cultural & Historical Perspectives. Meets with RCSSCI 460.001

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.001.

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HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 – Global Women's Health. Meets 9/24/02 to 10/17/02. (2 Credits). Meets with Women's Studies 482.001. (Drop/Add deadline=September 30).

Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu), Timothy R B Johnson (trbj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-2).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is global women's health? When did this field emerge? What kinds of concerns does it address, and how have these issues changed over time? What kinds of experts, organizations, funding, and women tend to be involved? How are qualitative research methods useful in global women's health? This course will address these questions while providing a general introduction to the emergence and development of this burgeoning interdisciplinary field.

This course will bring together 12 UM medical students with 12 students of women's studies, history, anthropology, and public health, etc. from UM's main campus.

Students interested in enrolling sould send a request by September 1, 2002 to nrhunt@umich.edu indicating background, interest in course and themes, and relevance to academic and professional training.

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HISTORY 600 / SI 580. Introduction to Archival Administration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David A Wallace

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 001 – Anthr/History Core Seminar. Meets with Anthropology 658.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 658.001.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 003 – Political Violence & Historical Memory. Meets with Cultural Anthropology 558.002.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/anthrcul/558/002.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 558.002.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 004 – Geographers & Cartographers: Shaping the Premodern World. Meets with AAPTIS 592.001.

Instructor(s): Michael Bonner , Diane Owen Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu), Gottfried J Hagen (ghagen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/aaptis/592/001.nsf

This course will compare the ways in which the world was bounded, charted, and described in the premodern period, particularly within Christian and Islamic spheres. Since both religious cultures reached back for geographic knowledge into the ancient Greco-Roman past, part of the interest of the course will be to assess the ways in which the shared authority of the past was transmitted, transmuted, and challenged between the fall of Rome in the fifth century and the encounter with new lands and cultures in the fifteenth and sixteenth. We will study attempts to grasp the world in maps (e.g., the Ptolemaic grid; portolan sea charts; spiritual mappaemundi), in literary accounts (e.g. the geographies compsosed by travelers and pilgrims; descriptions of marvels and wonders), as well as in texts deriving from bureaucratic practice (e.g., administrative manuals) in order to learn both how they envisioned and represented the globe and how they measured themselves and their civilization as they experienced cultures beyond its bounds. The course offers an opportunity for students from a variety of disciplinary and regional specialites to experience a range of the sources of premodern geographical knowledge (read in translation) and to achieve some sense of the benefits of cross-cultural exploration of the premodern world.

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HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 005 – Greek & Roman History Core Seminar.

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of and introduction to interpretive approaches and methodologies for Greek and Roman history. Readings will include representative samples of both classic scholarship and the latest research in Greek and Roman history, as well as comparative studies from the history of other periods and other disciplines. Requirements include written reviews of the readings, participation in all discussions, an oral presentation of a research project, and an extended paper about that project. Other professors associated with the Program in Greek and Roman History will be participating in some of the discussions, including faculty from classical studies, history, IPCAA, and Near Eastern studies.

All students interested in Greek and Roman history are welcome. This course is required for students in the Program in Greek and Roman History and for students earning the Certificate in Greek and Roman History. Questions or comments? Please contact Professor Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu).

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HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 001 – Introduction to History: Theories and Practices.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey H Eley (ghe@umich.edu), Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the historical craft, its methods, practices, and theories. We will read a selection of theoretical writings that have been influential in recent historiography. More crucially, we will read a diverse array of historical monographs from different times and world regions. In our meetings, we intend to discuss how historians shape their narratives, which methodological and theoretical tools they employ, and how we can engage historical writings intellectually. Finally, several jointly held seminar meetings will introduce students to history faculty and distinguished visitors (section 1 and 2). If desired, extra events will familiarize students with research opportunities on campus.

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HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 002 – Introduction to History: Theories & Practices.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu), Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/615.htm

This course focuses on the historical craft, its methods, practices, and theories. We will read a selection of theoretical writings that have been influential in recent historiography. More crucially, we will read a diverse array of historical monographs from different times and world regions. In our meetings, we intend to discuss how historians shape their narratives, which methodological and theoretical tools they employ, and how we can engage historical writings intellectually. Finally, several jointly held seminar meetings will introduce students to history faculty and distinguished visitors (section 1 and 2). If desired, extra events will familiarize students with research opportunities on campus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 622 / ECON 663. European Economic History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 663.001.

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HISTORY 628. Studies in Jewish History.

Section 001 – Meets with Judaic Studies 601.001

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to introduce graduate students to the methodological concerns and disciplinary perspectives of Jewish studies and the variety of texts (both classical and modern) that it encompasses. This year the substantive focus of the course will be the Jewish family from antiquity to the present. We will examine how biblical and rabbinics scholars, historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and literary critics (among others) have approached the institution of the Jewish family and how different value commitments and methodological frameworks have produced different images and visions of the Jewish family over time and place. We will also examine, at the same time, the primary documents (biblical and rabbinic texts, medieval responsa, memoirs, and short fiction, among others) that constitute the evidentiary base for their work.

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HISTORY 629 / CAAS 629. Studies in African History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What constitutes an African religious movement? And how have historians, anthropologists, and sociologists studied their forms, politics, signifying practices, motivations, and histories? This colloquium will review the historiography on religious forms of expression, including how they have been integrated into canonical narratives of African history, and have provoked anthropological, sociological, and historical debates over their political, therapeutic, psychological, and cultural significances. We will explore their relationships to war and violence, politics and sorcery,gender and embodiment, healing and suffering, spirit possession and therapeutic organizations, dispossession and exile, conflict and disobedience, slave raiding, colonial power, post-colonial politics, and popular culture.

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HISTORY 637 / SI 637. Problems in the Administration of Archives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Hedstrom

Prerequisites: HISTORY 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/si/637/001.nsf

The thematic focus of the seminar is memory and the role of archives as memory institutions. We begin the course by exploring different theories of memory and by examining the role of recorded information in memory processes with particular emphasis on collective memory. We then turn to the relationships between history, archives, and memory. We will spend some time on postmodern perspectives on archives and discuss why archives have become a problematic for postmodern philosophers. The seminar will examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection and through the interpretation and display of documentary evidence. We will also discuss issues of archives, memory and trauma and controversies over the selection and display pf history documents and artifacts. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past.

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HISTORY 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 001 – Old Regime, Age of Enlightenment, French Revolution

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/640/001.nsf

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to major issues in the recent historiography of France, primarily in the eighteenth century. The period is variously described as the end of the Old Regime, as the Age of Enlightenment, and as culminating in the French Revolution. We will try to grasp it as all three and to consider the possible relationships among them. For example: In what sense can the cultural origins of the Revolution be found in the Enlightenment? Why do some historians consider the Enlightenment to be part and parcel of the Old Regime, while others see it as a force of opposition? Did the Revolution bring an end to the the Old Regime or complete a process of social change inherent in the Old Regime itself? Did it bring an end to the Enlightenment, or realize its ideals? What was new about the Old Regime? What was old about the Revolution? What were the shadows of Enlightenment?

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HISTORY 641. Studies in 20th Century European History.

Section 001 – Modernity and the European City.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the history of European cities in the twentieth century as contested social, political, and cultural spaces. We will discuss the city both as an ideological space shaped by the tensions of modernity (class, ethnicity, gender, etc.). What are the theoretical and methodological implications of taking spatiality as a central category for historical analysis? What – if anything – is specific about the modern European city in global terms (for example compared to the US or the colonial context)? What are the historically situated differences between western and eastern, southern and northern, larger and smaller European cities? How has the shift from pre-industrial to industrial and post-industrial social relations affected urban life in Europe? We will address these and other questions in an interdisciplinary framework. Requirements will include a class presentation, two short papers, and a longer project based on secondary sources that relates both to the class and to each students' geographical and thematic interests.

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HISTORY 641. Studies in 20th Century European History.

Section 002 – European Cultural History. Meets with German 821.001

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of pyschoanalysis, all focusing on primary texts rather than a textbook. No prerequisites. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation including quizzes, a mid-term essay and a final paper.

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HISTORY 668 / CHIN 668. Studies in Early Chinese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a preseminar in premodern Chinese history before 1800. The main focus of the course is on the examination of the development of the field, the current state of research, and the various methodological approaches in the studies of premodern Chinese history. The topics include the following: 1. Approaches to Chinese historical analysis
2. The origins of Chinese civilization and state
3. Ancient China in transition: feudalism, social-economic-political changes, and the age of philosophers
4. Early Imperial China: the Ch'in-Han Empires
5. Middle Imperial China
6. Later Imperial China: the Sung and the Yuan
7. Late Imperial China: Ming and early Ch'ing
Each year, four or five of these topics are selected for study through weekly readings and discussions. The readings are selected from English language materials only. Course requirements: a term paper and short reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 669. Seminar: Studies in Late Imperial China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Elliott, James Lee

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level reading seminar in late imperial Chinese history, concentrating on the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1912) periods. Our goal is to learn how the field is structured and how it has grown by tracing the development of the important scholarly debates of recent years, including such topics as the state, the economy, demography, gender, ethnicity, elite thought, popular culture, and popular religion. Requirements include weekly presentations and reviews and a historiographic essay. This is a suitable course for beginning Ph.D students (whether in History or in other departments) who wish to develop a field for examination. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 686 / AMCULT 686. Studies in American Cultural History.

Section 001 – Popular & Mass Culture.

Instructor(s): James W Cook Jr

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore classic texts and current problems in U.S. cultural history, with a particular emphasis on popular/mass culture. Readings will cover the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, as well as a wide range of media (literature, exhibitions, theater, painting, music, film,Internet, etc.) Specific topics for Fall 2002 may include: categories of culture (vernacular, folk, subaltern,popular, mass, counter, borderlands); power and resistance; production and consumption; cultural undergrounds; culture industries; racialization and interracialism; cosmopolitanism; visual culture; and transnational exchanges.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 687 / CAAS 687. Studies in Black History.

Section 001 – Origins of the Black Atlantic.

Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will have the option of taking this course either as a studies course or as a seminar. The studies course (History/CAAS 687) will survey key issues in African American history through the end of the Civil War, including the forced migration of Africans to this hemisphere, slavery and emancipation, and cultural, social, and institutional development in black communities north and south. Students in the studies course will also spend time identifying and analyzing a variety of key primary sources from this period of African American history. There will be a couple of short writing assignments, and students will prepare a term essay (approximately 25 pp.) dealing with a historiographical issue of their own choosing. Students electing the seminar option will spend the academic term preparing original research papers related in some way to African history. The number of required meetings will be minimal, though seminar students will be welcome to participate in meetings of the studies course. In addition to the research paper, each seminar student will be required to present her/his topic to the entire group at some scheduled meeting of the studies course beginning at midterm. PLEASE NOTE that all students must complete the requirements designated for their option by the end of the winter term. No incompletes or "Y"s will be given. A tentative list of texts is available in the department graduate office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 688. Studies in Twentieth-Century American History.

Section 001 – Urban Crisis, Suburban Nation.

Instructor(s): Matthew Lassiter

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/688/001.nsf

Graduate seminar in Twentieth-Century U.S. history, emphasizing a metropolitan approach to and spatial analysis of the post-1940 period, from the Great Migration through contemporary debates regarding public policy, the inner-city, underclass, and suburban sprawl. From a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches, the readings probe the intersection of race, class, gender, neighborhood, grassroots movements, and structural forces on the devlopmental landscape of metropolitan America. The title of the course is not intended to imply fixed categories in a metropolitan dichotomy, but instead the intertwined discourses of urban crisis, and suburban nation, which we will approach skeptically and investigate thoroughly. Did the same policies that built the sprawling suburbs also produce the urban crisis? How does a metropolitan approach to postwar American recast historiographical debates about racial and class consciousness, public policy and political realignment,the rise and fall of the New Deal Order? Case studies of key cities and regions are interspersed with synthetic works and policy analyses that address such topics as the forging of inner-city and middle-class popular culture; the postwar reconstruction of the "American Dream"; the power shift from Rust Belt to Sunbelt; the intersection of market forces, state policy, and private action in urban space; and the emerging, interdisciplinary, postsuburban, synthesis. Interested graduate students are invited to contact the instructor for information about the course and the syllabus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 – Narratives & Histories.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu), Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using diaries, oral histories, memoirs, and other more formal writings, this course will explore the various ways experience was narrated into history in E. Europe and S.E. Asia, and the history of colonial and colonizing societies given their contentious and contending meanings. The course is designed to explore in comparative ways the relationsips between memory, narrative, social understanding, and the writing of history.

It is open to all graduate students regardless of their field of specialization.

Advanced undergraduates may be admitted with permission of the instructors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 002 – Rethinking Indigeneities: Represenation, History, and Ethics. Meets with American Culture 699.001 and Spanish 865.001.

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria (pdeloria@umich.edu), Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/698/002.nsf

The category "indigenous" has been produced historically in the moments – exploratory, imperial, colonial, and post-colonial – that surround contact between Europeans and the world's Others. This course seeks both to consider the knowledge produced out of these encounters and to ponder the decentering of that knowledge. Accordingly, we will take up issues surrounding origins and beginnings, the peopling of the Americas, and indigenous life before and after contact. We will consider representations of indigeneity – particularly its uses in constituting colonial national identities and contemporary indigenous narratives of nationhood. Finally, we will examine the ethical issues that stem from the creation and representation of knowledge built on the category "indigenous," including recent discussions concerning repatriation and the Yanomami. The course will include primary and secondary readings, films, and guest speakers, as well as a possible site visit to Cahokia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 003 – Sexualities: Histories/Theories. Meets with Women's Studies 698.004 and American Culture 699.006.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sexuality pervades the modern world. It is central to our definitions of pleasure and pain, central to our self-image, central as well to the production and deployment of power and knowledge. It dominates both popular culture and high theory. In its more violent forms, rape, for example, or castration, sexuality plays a critical role in the creation of modern nation states and national identities. (The bodies of raped women guard the borders of modern India and Pakistan, Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia.) Sexualized rhetoric legitimated Europe's domination of the world. The sexual exploitation of Native American and African women has characterized European/African/American relations from the 15th to the 20th century. On the domestic front, for the past 30 years, sexual issues have dominated Congressional debates, Supreme Court decisions, national and local elections. They have cloaked the New Right and extended governmental power into the most private spheres. This course explores the modern construction of sexuality, beginning with the Renaissance. We will explore examples drawn from Europe, the American and South Asia. We will examine the central role sexuality plays in the production of modern knowledge/power grids, the embodiment of modern republican states, nationalist and colonizing projects. Our focus will be multidisciplinary and cross cultural. We will work to locate sexual beliefs and practices within specific cultures, times and social groups. The impact of class, race and gender will be central to our analyses. The course will begin with Sigmund Freud and Michel Foucault, move on to an exploration of French psychoanalytic feminism with works by Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, and Rosi Braidotti, explore the suggestions of symbolic anthropologist Mary Douglas, critical legal theorist Drucilla Cornell, feminist poststructuralists Sue Ellen Case and Judith Butler, political scientist Carole Pateman. We will read novels and short stories, watch movies, read histories. We will examine aspects of homosexuality and heterosexuality, incest, slavery, abortion, prostitution, pornography, transvestism – and still other aspects of everyday sexuality. This course is a colloquium – not a research seminar. Focus will be on the weekly readings and on class discussions. Consequently, there will be no research paper. Rather class members will be responsible for writing a 1-2 page paper each week analyzing the week's readings. These papers must be handed in at the beginning of each class meeting. If you have not read the assignments and do not have a paper, please do not come to class. Class discussions only work if all members of the class are fully prepared and ready to enter into analysis and debate. Remember there are never any right or wrong answers. The only error is silence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 004 – History of American Education. Meets with Education 641.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Mirel (jmirel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the history of American public education from colonial to modern times. We will concentrate on several enduring themes: issues of religion, race, gender, and social class in American schools; the role education has played in developing American political and cultural identities; the links between educational reform and changes in the American economy; and the use of schools to solve major social problems. We will discuss the relationship of these interpretations to current issues and conflicts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This reading-oriented graduate course will survey the disciplinary history of the modern study of religion – known variously as "comparative religion," "history of religions," "Religionswissenschaft" or "science of religion" –and analyze the concurrent formation of the modern secularist and/or pluralist-ecumenicist discourse on religion in a broader political and cultural context.

We will begin by reviewing the legacy of some pre-19th-century European savants (e.g., Toland, Defoe, Hume, de Brosses, Lessing), then proceed to a comprehensive survey of notable 19th-century scholars and amateurs, including philologists (e.g., F. Max M|ller, E. Burnouf, C.P. Tiele, O. Pfleiderer, W. Robertson Smith), anthropologists (E.B. Tylor, T.H. Huxley, A.R. Wallace), philosophers (Feuerbach, Marx, W. James), and liberal theologians (J.F. Clarke and various American and Scottish divines). Among the most influential early 20th-century authors, Freud, Weber, and Durkheim will be considered.

Finally, we will look at one of the earliest historical accounts narrating the development of the science of religion (Louis Henry Jordan, Comparative Religion: Its Genesis and Growth, 1905) and one of the latest (Hans Kippenberg, Discovering Religious History in the Modern Age, 2002), and we will attempt to assess the relative value and cogency of various other such "histories" that have appeared in the meantime and that have been often adopted in survey courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 699 / CAAS 699. Afro-American History: Interpretations and Methodology.

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTORY 274 and 275; permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 699.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 765. Seminar in American History: the Middle Period.

Section 001 – Seminar in American History, 1815-1865.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will allow students to develop papers on topics relating to an aspect of American history in the period between the War of 1812 and the Civil War.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 781 / CAAS 781. Seminar in Black American History.

Section 001 – African American Research.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/781/001.nsf

History/African-American Studies 781 is a research seminar in African- American History. The purpose of the course is to give students the opportunity to explore the craft of historical research, argumentation, and writing, with a particular emphasis on the challenges of uncovering and interpreting the African-American historical experience. Over the course of the academic term, students will produce a substantial research paper, based on primary research, on a subject of the student's choosing. These individual projects will form the core of the seminar, but the class has been designed to encourage collaboration at all stages of the essay writing process. A prospectus/bibliography will be due in February; a first draft of the paper will be due in early April and a final draft at the end of the month.

During the first month of the academic term, the class will collaborate on 2-3 research exercises based on a current research project on the Underground Railroad that is being sponsored by the UM's Arts of Citizenship Program and the Washtenaw County African-American Historical Museum. During the first month, the class will also read and discuss a small number of monographic and theoretical essays on African-American history drawn from three essential historical anthologies: Raymond D'Angelo (ed.), The American Civil Rights Movement: Readings and Interpretations ; Darlene Clark Hine, et al., (eds.), We Specialize in the Wholly Impossible: A Reader in Black Women's History ; Frederick Cooper, et al. (eds.), Beyond Slavery: Explorations of Race, Labor and Citizenship in Postemancipation Societies . Each of these anthologies will be available at Shaman Drum Bookshop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 793 / MENAS 695 / AAPTIS 793. The Study of the Near East.

Section 001 – Culture and Politics in the Contemporary Middle East.

Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Middle Eastern and North African Studies 695.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 796. Topics in History.

Section 001 – The Atlantic 18th Century.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu), Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This research seminar focuses on the Atlantic world (broadly speaking) in the 18th century (broadly speaking). Co-taught by historians whose research interests focus on Anglo-America and France, the seminar will be equally interested in the circulation of people, goods, and ideas; the impact of European culture and colonization on the New World; and the impact of colonialism and New World cultures on the Old. We hope to bring together doctoral students interested in the Americas, the Caribbean, the British Isles, and the European Continent to consider issues relevant to writing the history of transatlantic economies, societies, cultures, and politics from about 1650 to 1850. Topics to be explored include: race and slavery; nation, empire, and colony; material culture and everyday life; trade and commerce. In the first part of the course we will examine these topics in relation to sources available to the historian and methods of analyzing them. Students will be asked to prepare and discuss readings in class and to do excercises involving the analysis of primary sources. Meanwhile, they will develop their own research topics. The final grade for the course will be based primarily on the research paper: a substantial paper which draws upon primary sources and relevant scholarship.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 801. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 803. Reading for the General Examination.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.. (1-3). This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U." (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course has a grading basis of "Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory"

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 812. Seminar on History Pedagogy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Second-year graduate standing or higher. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of History 812 is to prepare students for the rigors of running a college-level history class. The course deals with practical "how-to" issues about course design, grading, lecturing, moderating discussions, etc., and also explores some of the broader issues and controversies of the pedagogical side of the historical profession.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course for students working on special research projects in Asian history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/history/898/001.nsf

Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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