College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 7:26 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


HISTART 427 / CLARCH 427. Pompeii: Its Life and Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clarch/427/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 428 / CLARCH 428. The Public Spaces of Imperial Rome.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 222. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 428.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 431 / AMCULT 433. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century," played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This class will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories - from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 436 / CLARCH 436. Hellenistic and Roman Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 221 or 222. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/clarch/436/001.nsf

See Classical Archaeology 436.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 437 / CLARCH 437. Egyptian Art and Archaeology.

Section 001 Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Instructor(s): John Baines

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/insthum/411/001.nsf

See Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 448. Medieval Manuscript Illumination.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to an art form highly developed in the Middle Ages: the richly illuminated hand-written book. Beginning with the invention of the codex in late antiquity and ending with the advent of the printed book in the early modern era, the course will treat significant moments in the history of manuscript. Masterworks ranging from the Lindisfarne Gospels to the Tres Riches Heures will be studied as products of particular historical circumstances. Topics include the process of making a manuscript, the changing status of scribes and illuminators, the evolving roles of patrons, types of books and their functions, and forms of decoration. Visits to the Rare Book Room will be arranged to look at original manuscripts and facsimiles. There will be a midterm and final, a shorter and a longer paper or project.

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HISTART 463. Varieties of Dutch and Flemish Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102 and 260. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the extraordinary production of pictorial art in the Netherlands during the seventeenth century, and key roles played by pictures in the formation and life of the Dutch Republic. Our explorations will take us into the spheres of painting, drawings, prints, maps, book illustrations and the entire range of pictorial representations and technologies that constituted Dutch visual culture. The course will situate Dutch art within its historical and social circumstances, and investigate its relation to the broader visual culture of the Dutch Republic. Lectures will give special emphasis to the innovative work in still life, landscape, portraiture, perspective and optics, and scenes of social life for which Netherlandish artists have long been renowned. Discussions will examine the character, meanings, and functions of these pictures; the aesthetic, social, and economic values they enjoyed, and the ways of seeing they generated. In the process we will look at how Dutch pictures were made and marketed, how people made sense of them, and how they circulated both in the Netherlands and beyond.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 468. Sculptural Practices of the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces a radical shift in sculptural sensibility and practice over the last century or so from a conception of sculpture as "object" to one of "place" a shift well described by the minimalist sculptor Carl Andre in terms of the successive transformation of interest in the Statue of Liberty:

"In the days of form sculptors were interested in the Statue of Liberty because of the modeling of Bartholdi and the modeling of the copper sheet that was [its] form....Then people came to be interested in structure....in Eiffel's cast iron interior structure...[in] taking the copper sheets off...and looking at the cast iron or steel that constituted the structure on which the copper plates were hung. Now sculptors aren't even interested in Eiffel's structure any more. They're interested in Bedloe's Island and what to do with that. So I think of Bedloe's Island as a place."

Beginning with an analysis of two extremely polemical arguments Lessing's space-time differential (1766) and Krauss' expanded field (1978) we will examine the history of European and American sculpture since Rodin, focusing on four main issues in particular:

  1. the problem of temporality in a medium traditionally assumed to be static;
  2. the advent of construction as a mode of sculptural production;
  3. the resistance to integral form and the declaration of process itself as a form of sculptural practice;
  4. the shift from a (modernist) conception of sculpture-as-object to one of sculpture-as-place or situation (site specificity).

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HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 Confluence of Cultures: the Making of 'India' during the 5th through 15th Centuries CE. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Patel

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Conventional surveys in "Indian" art history often cover broader time spans with less emphasis on particularities, and develop the topic from a linear and regionally limited perspective. This course hopes to broaden those parameters by looking at long-enduring patterns of cultural confluences in Asia, which were instrumental in creating what we term 'Indian art' today.

The course will explore the making of visual idioms in South Asia from the 5th through 15th centuries, particularly (but not exclusively) in painting and architecture. The emphasis will be on tracing the coalescences of distinctive modes of building and representation, which were essentially processes of cultural confluence between the "indigenous" Indic traditions, and those flowing in from the Near East and East Asia. In setting the stage for this examination, some previous cultural links will be explored as well: Although the focus will be on the millennium spanning the 5th-15th centuries, an important introduction to patterns and mechanisms of cultural transmission during the Harappan (2500-1700 BCE) and Early Historic (3rd century BCE-3rd century CE) periods will be provided. An examination of the continuity or cessation of these patterns will be an important line of enquiry underpinning our look at the subsequent centuries. The course will have mid-term and final examinations, along with a short report on objects in local collections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 Research in Chinese Art and Culture: Chinese Narrative Art (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be elected for a total of nine credits. May be elected more than once in the same academic term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as a workshop primarily for undergraduate students who are interested in doing research in Chinese art and culture. It examines the issues of political expression, identity construction, history writing, social memory, moral education, religious propaganda, and personal experience by focusing on narrative works of art. The instructor will provide introductory lectures on the original visual materials and related secondary publications. With the guidance of the instructor, students are expected to select and carry out their own mini research projects and present their studies to the class. Students will not only learn how to do research in Chinese art history but also how to dramatize their presentations with visual aids.

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HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 603. Independent Study in Asian Art.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 611 / CAAS 611. Topics in African American Art.

Section 001 African American artists from the nineteenth-century to the Present: Critical, Historical, Biographical Writing.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTART 478 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is focused on the writing critical, historical, biographical about African American artists from the nineteenth-century to the present. Students who have taken coursework in African-American art will have an excellent opportunity to re-investigate the ongoing efforts to simply document the artists' work as well as the most recent scholarship that more aggressively evaluates practices. While approaches in this field have been predominantly sociocultural, we will also examine other deployed methodologies, namely feminist, psychoanalytic, and semiotic. Weekly readings demand students close attention: summary abstracts and assessments of the assigned texts are among the graded requirements. In addition, students will undertake two research papers, and a minimum of two oral presentations. Enrollment limited to 12 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 615. First Year Graduate Seminar.

Section 001 Formalism & Contextualism.

Instructor(s): Maria E Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will introduce new graduate students in the History of Art to one of the most important methodological problems of their chosen discipline: the tension between, on the one hand, "formalism" (the study of art as an autonomous enterprise wherein the formal elements and organization of specific works are analyzed chiefly in terms of their transformation of preexisting material, whether of the outside world or previous works), and on the other, "contextualism" (an approach which seeks to reintegrate the work of art within the context of its making and consumption, foregrounding its status as both historical document and act of social communication). Through a reading of major critical texts by Riegl, Wölfflin, Marx, Engels, Saussure, Shklovskii, Jakobson, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin/Medvedev, Benjamin, Barr, Schapiro, Greenberg, Antal, Hauser, Barthes, Bois, Krauss, Jameson, Clark and others, this tension will be examined in its chief historical articulations from the late-19th century to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 677. Studies in American Art.

Section 001 Representation and Realism. Meets with American Culture 699.008.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An informed understanding of how representation works is a building-block of any artistic or cultural analysis. This seminar interrogates the idea of "American Realism" by examining both realism and representation as rhetorical, power-laden practices. Ranging across fiction, documentary, and art, we will test the insights of literary and photographic theories of representation (Barthes, Lukacs, Tagg, etc.) on works that have made competing claims to represent American realities. Our study will begin with the rise of bourgeois reportage and the penny press in the early nineteenth century and conclude with the self-interrogating documentary Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Along the way we will read some defining literary icons (including Dickens and Flaubert as well as Twain, Crane, and Howells) and reinterpret the art of Eakins, Riis, Remington's depictions of Native Americans, the American Trompe-l'oeil painters, Sojourner Truth's self-representations, and others. Students will then apply the insights gained through readings and class discussion to research projects in their own fields of interest. Students from Comparative Literature, English, Film/Video, History, Art, and Architecture in addition to History of Art and American Culture are encouraged to participate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 690 / CHIN 695. Topics in the Theory and Criticism of Chinese Art.

Section 001 Coding-Artistic Presentation.

Instructor(s): Martin J Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One 400-level or higher course in Chinese art history and 2 years Chinese language. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar students will examine the fundamentals of the social protocols of artistic presentation in a comparative context, the focus being on China. Each student will produce, as an exercise in pedagogical writing, a survey of one aspect of artistic presentation in China: signatures, colophons, prefaces to catalogues, a particular format (screens, hanging scrolls), brushwork or other physical marks of artistic action. A wide variety of primary source material is available in translation which can be mined for basic but historically interesting facts about artistic practice so that translations will be useful in most cases. We plan to make extensive use of the University Museum, where we will learn first hand the protocols of connoisseurship and the "practices of vision" which evolved in early modern China. Each week students will prepare a precis of a selected reading. During the term students will deliver a preliminary and a final oral presentation and complete the term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 720 / WOMENSTD 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts.

Section 001 Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts: Gender, Religion, and Visual Culture. Meets with Anthropology 658.002, History of Art 772.001, and Rackham 570.001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons , Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu), Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students from various disciplines are welcome in a lively exchange on gender, religion, and visual culture. Our focus will be the Judeo-Christian tradition, especially in Early Modern Europe, but comparative materials will be drawn from African, Graeco-Roman, and American cultures. A fundamental question is the issue of visualization, and why sight is a primary sense in religious practices. An anthropology of the senses will thus operate in dialogue with art history, informed by the perspective of gender and sexuality studies. From cult figurines and Torah binders, to altar reliefs and polemical Protestant prints, material objects are at the forefront. The course is structured thematically. We first tackle the issue of embodiment, considering the modes by which a religious cosmos is gendered. Secondly, in (Dis)embodiment we turn to the dialectic relationship between body and spirit, by examining spirit possession, exorcism, and veiling/wrapping practices. Lastly, we consider the institutionalization of bodies, looking at the gendering of religious institutions and vocations. This interdisciplinary investigation will be led by Gillian Feeley Harnik (Anthropology), Pat Simons (Women's Studies/History of Art) and Megan Holmes (History of Art). Traditional disciplinary boundaries will be broken down, but also set into relief, as we ponder how future work can be enriched by previously unconsidered and unexpected frameworks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 771. Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century.

Section 001 Ingres.

Instructor(s): Susan Siegfried

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The status of Old Masters is secured by myths that seek to represent the essence of their achievement. Ingres is no exception, but is unusual because the competing mythologies seeking to explain his work manifest a deep-seated anxiety about his significance. This seminar explores the puzzlement he has posed, both among his contemporaries and later historians. Already before his death he was instated as a key figure of nineteenth-century art, but one whose status defied critical resolution. Ever since then there has been a tendency to see his work as simultaneously fascinating and indigestible. Art movements collide in their different interpretations of him (classicism, l'art pour l'art, realism), and he has been enlisted both as a radical proto-modernist and a conservative bulwark of tradition. Examining the tensions between these positions helps us to appreciate what makes his art so compelling. It is my belief that myths of the artist cannot be separated from our thinking about the work. We shall be exploring Ingres both as a cultural institution and a set of artworks; while the institutions bear examining we also need to go back to the works to consider why they keep perpetuating such contradictory responses. We will be looking closely at some of his more controversial and complex paintings, such as Napoleon I on his Imperial Throne, Jupiter and Thetis, the Martyrdom of Saint Symphorien and Antiochus and Stratonike.

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HISTART 993. GSI Training.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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