College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 7:28 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


LING 447 / PSYCH 445. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 240. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/psych/445/001.nsf

See Psychology 445.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 450. Perspectives on Second Language Learning and Instruction.

Section 001 MEETS With LING 350.001

Instructor(s): Joan Morley (hjmorley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LING 350. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore past and current directions in both theoretical and practical aspects of second/foreign language learning and teaching. The course will examine a number of language learning/teaching paradigms and focus on the changing forms and functions of methodology, technique, and approach as the emphasis of language pedagogy has shifted from teacher-directed, drill and pattern practice to learner-focused, task-based instruction. Students will have an opportunity to reflect upon and analyze their own language learning experiences and begin to critique and understand the instructional needs of varying language learning populations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 512. Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 313. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~benki/L512/syllabus512.html

This course introduces students to the nature of speech sounds. One goal is to provide an overview of the type of sounds in the world's languages and to train students in the production and transcription of these (sometimes "exotic") sounds. Practice with these sounds is accomplished through native-speaker presentations, in-class exercises, and computer demonstrations. A second goal is to arrive at an understanding of the speech process, which involves transmission of an acoustic signal from a speaker to a listener, and a corresponding description of speech sounds in terms of their articulatory (speaker-based), acoustic, and perceptual (listener-based) characteristics. In achieving this goal, students are introduced to basic principles of phonetic theory through readings, lectures, and hands-on experience in the phonetics laboratory. A third goal is to investigate interactions among articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual properties and to consider their possible consequences for the structure of sound systems. These phonetic properties are viewed as imposing constraints on the notion of a "possible speech sound" and as contributing to the definition of the "possible speech sound system" for human languages.

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LING 515. Generative Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio Pires (pires@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 315. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/ling/pires/ling515.html

In the Generative framework, syntactic structure is generated by a formal rule system and by applying constraints to its output. Some of these rules and constraints are hypothesized to be innate, or "unlearned" (perhaps a species specific system). That is supported by how human language acquisition or grammar growth takes place, and by the observation of striking structural similarities across different human languages. Other aspects of our linguistic knowledge appear "learned", i.e., determined by an interaction of human biology and particular linguistic inputs, motivating different aspects of variation among human languages. This coruse introduces this so-called "Principles and Parameters" approach to the analysis of human syntactic knowledge, focusing on how the various postulated ("simple") rules and constraints interact to generate ("complex") structures, characteristic of natural language sentences (such as the one you are now reading, and understanding).

Course requirements may include weekly assignments and/or a midterm, and a final exam or paper. For undergraduates, Linguistics 315 and permission of the instructor are prerequisites. There is no prerequisite for graduate students.

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LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the theories and methods that enable linguists to describe and explain processes of linguistic change and historical relationships among languages. The major topics to be covered are the emergence of language families and means of establishing family relationships; sound change; grammatical change, especially analogy; language change caused by culture contacts; the Comparative Method, through which prehistoric language states can be reconstructed with an impressive degree of accuracy; internal reconstruction, a less powerful but still important method for gaining information about linguistic prehistory; and ways in which the study of current dialect variation offers insights into processes of change.

Course requirements: regular homework assignments (45%), final exam (45%), class participation (10%).

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LING 521. Morphology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: At least one introductory linguistics course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The traditional core of morphology is word-structure. It studies how grammatical categories are expressed by audible modifications of lexical stems, and is therefore at the cross-roads of phonology and syntax/semantics. Morphology extends naturally from simple words to compounding and cliticization. Topics covered in detail in this course are the following: affixation, ablaut (Semitic, Berber, etc.), rich pronominal agreement, grammatical tone systems, cliticization, compounding, tightly-knit "syntactic" phrases that have some similarity to compounding, markedness theory, formal (generative) morphology, and the historical evolution of morphological systems. The possibility of broadening morphology to encompass all aspects of surface form (including linearization) will also be considered.

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LING 541 / EECS 595. Natural Language Processing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richmond H Thomason (rthomaso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. (3). CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/cl/cl-course.html

An introduction to computational linguistics, stressing the processing of written language but with supplementary discussion of topics relating to spoken language. The course will be based on the following textbook: Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Speech and Natural Language Processing, Prentice Hall, 1999.

Topics covered in this course will include: finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context-free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and (if time permits) machine translation. There will be a midterm and a final examination, as well as a course project and regularly assigned exercises. Non-CS students without strong programming experience will not have to do a project that requires programming.

This course is the normal introduction to computational linguistics for advanced undergraduates or graduate students in Computer Science, the School of Information, or Linguistics, and normally is a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the area at the University of Michigan. For linguistics students, LING 513 and any other 400- or more advanced level linguistics course are prerequisites. Computer literacy is essential; some programming experience would be helpful. Students in Computer Science or the School of Information should take the versions of this course offered in those units.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 562. Conversation Analysis and the Dynamics of Interactive Discourse.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One Linguistics course and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

'All speech, written or spoken, is a dead language, until it finds a willing and prepared hearer'.

--Robert Louis Stevenson, Reflections and Remarks on Human Life.

We shall bear in mind this assertion as we proceed - in particular, we shall consider precisely what a willing and prepared hearer needs to do.

The course will begin with a brief overview of approaches to interactive discourse, in order to situate the Conversation Analysis framework within the broader fields of Pragmatics and Discourse Analysis. Some characteristic structural patterns of informal spoken language will be considered, and a contrast drawn between conversation and institutional types of discourse. The course will then consider a range of issues designed to show how speakers collaboratively organize their discourse, each taking account of the ongoing contribution of the conversational partner or partners. These issues include turntaking and repair procedures; the management of conversational openings and closings; and the role of non-linguistic elements such as laughter in the organization of conversation. Finally, some applications of Conversation Analysis will be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 613. Advanced Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 513. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/ling/613/001.nsf

In this course we will read and discuss selected works on issues that are of fundamental interest to phonology. We will focus on the following areas: Feature theory, Syllable theory, Metrical phonology, and Optimality theory. Regular course work includes assigned readings, participation in class discussion, and exercises. In addition, each student is expected to choose and work on a research topic, give a class presentation near the end of the course, and submit the result in a final term paper.

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LING 702 / EECS 597 / SI 760. Language and Information.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dragomir Radkov Radev (radev@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://perun.si.umich.edu/~radev/760/syllabus.html

Prerequisites:

  1. SI 503 (may be taken concurrently) OR EECS 380 OR EECS 595 (may be taken concurrently) OR LING 541 (may be taken concurrently) AND
  2. graduate standing OR permission of the instructor

Audience: Mostly doctoral students, also master's students and advanced undergraduates.

A survey of techniques used in language studies and information processing. Students will learn how to explore and analyze textual data in the context of Web-based information retrieval systems. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to work as information designers and analysts.

  1. The study of Language. Linguistic Fundamentals.
  2. Mathematical and Probabilistic Fundamentals. Descriptive Statistics. Measures of central tendency. The z score. Hypothesis testing.
  3. Information theory. Entropy, joint entropy, conditional entropy. Relative entropy and mutual information. Chain rules. The entropy of English.
  4. Working with corpora. N-grams.
  5. Language models. Noisy channel models. Hidden Markov Models.
  6. Cluster analysis. Clustering of terms according to semantic similarity. Distributional clustering.
  7. Collocations. Syntactic criteria for collocability.
  8. Literary detective work. The statistical analysis of writing style. Decipherment and translation.
  9. Information Retrieval
  10. Text summarization. Single-document summarization. Multi-document summarization. Maximal Marginal Relevance. Cross-document structure theory. Trainable methods.
  11. Information Extraction. Message understanding.
  12. Question Answering. Semantic representation. Predictive annotation.
  13. Word sense disambiguation and lexical acquisition. Supervised disambiguation. Unsupervised disambiguation. Attachment ambiguity. Computational lexicography.
  14. Other topics. Text alignment. Word alignment. Statistical machine translation. Statistical text generation. Discourse segmentation. Text categorization.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADES

  • Assignments (45%): The assignments will involve analysis of real textual data using both manual and automated techniques.
  • Project (30%): Data analysis and/or programming project.
  • Final (25%): A mixture of short-answer and essay-type questions

READING LIST:

  • Required books:
    • Manning and Schuetze. Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing. MIT Press. 1999.
    • Oakes. Statistics for Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh University Press 1998.
  • Reference readings:
    • Jurafsky and Martin. Speech and Language Processing. Prentice-Hall 2000.
    • Cover & Thomas. Elements of Information Theory. John Wiley and Sons 1991.
    • Baeza-Yates and Ribeiro-Neto. Modern Information Retrieval. Addison-Wesley 1999.
  • A small number of articles will be assigned to complement the major readings. These articles will be primarily from ACL, AAAI, SIGIR proceedings and/or the following journals: Computational Linguistics, Information Retrieval, Artificial Intelligence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 756 / PSYCH 756. The Development of Language and Communication Skills.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel D Epstein (sepstein@umich.edu), Marilyn J Shatz

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 756.001.

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LING 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Phonetics for Sociolinguists. Prerequisites: One of the following: LING 542, ANTHRCUL 572 or ANTHRCUL 576. MEETS With LING 492.002

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu), Rusty Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As research in language variation and change advances, progress is increasingly dependent on work that successfully combines analysis of language as a social phenomenon with theories of sound structure. This course will introduce students to the application of phonetic theories and methods to research in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Topics will include phonetic models of variability both within and across languages and situations, phonetic factors for models of sound change (including "internal factors," chain shifts, and contact-induced change), and the multiple roles of suprasegmental variation in areas such as pragmatics, interactional sociolinguistics, and the structure of verbal art. Students will learn how to make basic spectrographic measurements for studying vowel systems and intonational phenomena. Requirements will include homework assignments, presentations and a final paper based on original research. Prerequisites for 492: LING 313 and either LING/ANTH 272 or LING 340. Prerequisites for 792: One of the following: LING 542, ANTHRCUL 572 or ANTHRCUL 576.

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LING 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 History of the Modern Field of Linguistics. (1 credit).

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-2).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar has three goals. The first is to introduce students to the history of the modern field of linguistics. In the Fall Term we will focus on readings and discussions that will take us from 19th-century linguistics through the Chomskyan revolution of the 1960s. In the Winter Term we will concentrate on the past 30 years of (mostly American) linguistics. The second goal is to begin to develop an understanding of the diverse approaches to the study of linguistics and an appreciation for the relations among these different approaches. Thus the course also serves as a forum where students can discuss how the various aspects of their coursework fit together. These two goals converge in helping us to build an integrated view of the discipline. The third goal is specific to the first-year students in the Department of Linguistics: the seminar will orient these students to graduate study in linguistics in the Department, and at the university, and to consider first-year students' long-term goals relative to the course of study they are embarking on. Throughout the year, many of our discussions will be led by linguistics faculty with expertise in specific topics to be covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 815. Seminar: Syntax.

Section 001 Acquisition of Pidgins/Creoles. Meets with CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in syntax. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/ling/815/001.nsf

This seminar introduces students to aspects of the study of pidgin and creole languages, including theories of pidgin/creole genesis, the definitive characteristics of these languages, the similarities and relationships among them, and their significance for linguistic theory in general. Special attention will be paid to discussing questions such as: Is creolization a matter of first or second language acquistion? What are the respective roles of substrate, superstrate, and universal grammar in creole genesis? What, if any are the differences between creole development and normal language change?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 819. Seminar: Discourse Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Previous course in discourse analysis. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will explore the range of discourses that orchestrate the contemporary research world. In so doing, we will address the following issues and topics (among others):

  1. What kind of genre theory will work best for which purposes?
  2. How best can we understand and contribute to recent work on genre networks (such as relations between presentations and publications)?
  3. How do theory and methodology intersect in discourse analysis?
  4. What can diachronic studies contribute to our understanding of research genres?
  5. How best can we describe and account for disciplinary variation? How true is it that research discourse is objective and dispassionate?)
  6. Is it the case that English is now dominant as the language of research communication? What ideological issues arise? What place is left for comparative and contrastive rhetoric?
  7. Is academic speech more like academic prose or conversation? (Using corpus linguistics and the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English)
  8. What can be learnt from Citation Analyses of various kinds?
  9. How best can we understand "examinable" genres such as the Dissertation and its Defense?
  10. What about the "hidden" genres of applications and evaluations, etc?

One source of material for this seminar will be an emerging manscript for CUP provisionally entitled "The Genres of the Research World". (This "should" be completed by September and Readers' reports of the first 150 pages should be available by Spring Break if anybody wants to see them.) We will also be using Ken Hyland's Disciplinary Discourses (2000), plus lots of research papers. For those who feel that it might be helpful, there will be some summer reading recommendations.

Whatever else it might do, the seminar should raise participants' rhetorical awareness of the research worlds they inhabit.

Last time I had the opportunity to offer a seminar (1997), most of the participants divided early into one of two working groups, thus making it possible to get close to submissible manuscripts by the end of the academic term. One was eventually published in "Applied Linguistics"; the other in "Language and Communication". I would be happy to see a repeat of this experience.

Comments and suggestions warmly and thoughtfully received.

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LING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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LING 997. Special Research I and II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate-level independent research course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for LING.


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