College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term '02 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 7:31 PM on Thu, Oct 3, 2002.

Fall Academic Term, 2002 (September 3 - December 20)


POLSCI 407. Marxism and 20th Century Radicalism.

Theory

Section 001 The Soviet Experiment.

Instructor(s): Gordon N Harding

Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course could be subtitled "The Soviet Experiment"; not because it is a course on Soviet politics, but because it will focus on the the evolution and implications of Marxist/commmunist ideas.

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POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will critically compare and examine key figures in contemporary continental political theory. Readings will be drawn from the works of Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Sorel, Gramsci, Michels, Schmitt, Mosca, Schumpeter, Althusser, Foucault, Castoriadis, and Habermas. We will focus on how these thinkers approach the concepts of power, the state, socialism and communism, representation, ideology and hegemony, democracy, liberalism, and legitimacy from the point of view of political modernity and its challenges.

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POLSCI 432. Law and Public Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marvin Krislov

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent. (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/432/001.nsf

This course will focus on the ways our courts do and do not intervene in politics and the political process, both on the federal and state level. Topics to be covered include: the regulation of voting, voting rights, the Census, Congressional reapportionment, campaign finance, and the selection (or election) of federal and state judges. Students will be asked to write several short papers or memoranda.

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POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in political science. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/486/001.nsf

This course will cover the history of the American party system, with a special emphasis on the state of Michigan. Beginning with the pre-Civil War period, the readings and lectures will treat the shifts in public opinion that give rise to new popular movements and pressure groups, which then modify or destroy the contemporary party system. The course will be taught with a research emphasis. Several computer-based assignments will introduce students to the historical study of electoral politics.

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POLSCI 500. First Year Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/500/001.nsf

This 2-credit course is intended to provide graduate students interested in academic careers with an introduction to our profession. We will alternate between sessions with invited members of our department that focus on major subfields (e.g., political theory, world politics, comparative politics, etc.) and sessions that focus on topics often untouched in traditional graduate programs (e.g., faculty roles, ethics, governance, etc.) This course is highly recommended for first-year PhD students but is also suitable for others who anticipate faculty careers.

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POLSCI 513 / SOC 513. Practicum in Survey Research.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Mohai, Steven R Brechin

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 513.001.

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POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Chih Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 585.001.

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POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available at 611 Church Street, Suite 334.

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POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available at 611 Church Street, Suite 334.

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POLSCI 599. Statistical Methods in Political Research I.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Burns (nburns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; concurrent election of POLSCI 514 is strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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POLSCI 599. Statistical Methods in Political Research I.

Methods

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nancy E Burns (nburns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; concurrent election of POLSCI 514 is strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first course in statistics requiring little or no previous exposure to the subject. Topics covered include probability theory, sampling distributions, sampling theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, and strategies of data analysis. POLSCI 514, Introduction to the Social Science Computer, is strongly recommended to be taken concurrently with POLSCI 599.

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POLSCI 602. Political Thought up to the Early Modern Period.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the origins and development of Western political thought from Ancient Greece to the early sixteen century. We will discuss the normative foundations of classical, Roman, medieval, and early modern political theory, the first efforts to distinguish among different regime forms, the birth of democracy and its critics, the republican response, the transformations brought by the rise of Christianity, the problems posed by the intertwinement of the sacred and the profane, and finally the tide of secularization brought about by the Renaissance. Questions related to the nature and ends of politics, the sources of sovereignty, the concept of political freedom, the quest for justice, the role of the individual in the political community, and the various justifications of political obligation, will be of central importance. The course will selectively cover the works of Herodotus, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Demosthenes, Cicero, Polybius, St. Augustine, John of Salisbury, St. Aquinas, Marsilius de Padova, William of Ockham, Machiavelli, and probably of Suarez and Bodin.

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POLSCI 611. Proseminar in American National Government.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the major theoretical concepts in the study of American politics. Students will have the opportunity to read books and articles from a wide range of topics, including studies of American legislatures, courts, executives, bureaucracies, elections, mass opinion and behavior, and constitutional law. Several short papers and a seminar paper are the written assignments.

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POLSCI 614. Proseminar in Law and Society.

Public Law

Section 001 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Legal Institutions.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 612 or 613 recommended. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ever since Roscoe Pound called for the study of "law in action" (and the subsequent advent of sociological jurisprudence), the social science disciplines have developed distinct approaches to the study of law and legal institutions. This seminar offers a survey of major works at the intersection of law and political science, as well as sociology, psychology, economics and history. During the first half of the seminar we'll examine similarities between and differences among the questions and methodologies that various disciplinary approaches have brought to the study of law. Focusing on political science, the remainder of the seminar will focus on the contributions of the following theoretical frameworks to the study of law and politics: "old institutionalism," judicial behavior, rational choice, and historical institutionalism.

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POLSCI 623. Proseminar in Municipal Problems.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps623f02.html

The seminar in municipal problems will comprehensively explore in each session the major dilemmas and issues in American cities with populations of at least 100,000 and the leadership strategies political figures utilize to address these dilemmas. We will examine theories or city governance, elitism, mayoral leadership, pluralism, regime theory, urban power, urban government, and democracy, among others.

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POLSCI 636 / PUBPOL 636. Program Evaluation I.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Schoeni

Prerequisites: ECON 571 or concurrent enrollment in PUBPOL 633. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 636.001.

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POLSCI 641. Proseminar in Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu), Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html

This proseminar is designed to provide the participants with an overview of important topics in comparative politics. Each week, the participants will discuss an area of the scholarly literature, usually focusing on a major theoretical controversy. We will examine basic methodological questions, competing or alternative conceptual frameworks, and the development of theory.

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POLSCI 647. Proseminar in Comparative Elite Analysis.

Comparative

Section 001 Executive Leadership in Western Democracies.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the differential leadership capacities that top political executives (head of governments) can achieve while performing in different institutional formats. Executive political leadership is understood as the process by which chief executives prime ministers, presidents, chancellors, etc. - try to exercise control over public policy decisions. For practical purposes the case studies are restricted to the countries of the original G7 group. As major economies and established liberal democracies they have enough in common to make comparison possible, but sufficient institutional diversity to make comparison interesting. However, occasional references to countries with executive settings not found among the G7 such as Russia, Israel, or Switzerland will be made.

The first part of the course will cover the major theoretical literature on institutional design and how it matters to the understanding of executive leadership. The middle part will look at the formal and informal powers of chief executives of individual countries as well as at internal power balances within the political system. The final part of the course will try to assess broader cross-national trends in the development of executive leadership.

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POLSCI 649. Politics and Society in Latin America.

Comparative

Section 001 Electoral Behavior in Latin America.

Instructor(s): Jose E Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/649/001.nsf

This Graduate Seminar on Latin American Politics will look at the state of democracy in Latin America and the factors linked to their stability and problems, in the region as a whole and in some specific countries. Several cases will be examined closely, so as to have an in-depth look at the different situations and problems faced by Latin American democracy. Students will be asked to write a research paper on one of the issues covered, focusing either on one or several countries.

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POLSCI 650. Political Development.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ashutosh Varshney (varshney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/650/001.nsf

This seminar will offer a comprehensive introduction to the field of comparative development, from the 1950's to the 1990's. We will critically review the major theoretical approaches to development, including modernization theory, dependency theory, state-society approaches, the new institutionalism, and post-structuralism; we will also consider the major substantive debates, covering democratization, the politics of economic policy, the role of international financial institutions, and the problems of nationalism and ethnic conflict.

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POLSCI 652 / JUDAIC 652. Jewish Political Thought and Experiences.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course explores political ideas embedded in "classic" Jewish texts and sees how these ideas were implemented (or not) in sovereign Jewish states, ancient and contemporary, and in Jewish self-government (kehillot) in the diaspora. The course analyzes the transformation of Jewish political life from traditional to modern modes - the shift from oligarchical to mass politics, from kehillot to political parties, from postures of pleading to those of political aggregates and articulation. We will examine political movements such as Zionis, Bundism, and Communism; Jewish political behavior in the United States; and the Jewish and other sources of Jewish political thought and behavior in Israel.

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POLSCI 656. Proseminar in Chinese Government and Politics.

Comparative

Section 001 Ruling China: Past and Present.

Instructor(s): Ellis Joffe (ejoffe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The topic of the seminar will be "Ruling China: Past and Present." The seminar will be divided into two parts. The first part, which will take up most of the seminar, will be a combination of lectures and discussions based on readings. The purpose is to examine the Chinese political system from a wide but specific angle: how China's leaders have ruled the country since 1949, and how their capacity to rule effectively has changed over the years. The method will be to analyze the main components of effective rule as they have evolved since the establishment of the communist regime. In the second part, the participants will present an introduction to their papers and a brief outline of its contents.

Requirement: seminar paper and participation in the discussions.

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POLSCI 660. Proseminar in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/660/001.nsf

This course introduces the graduate student to the research frontiers of world politics. It proceeds by covering important books and recent areas of research in international conflict and political economy. The class is conducted as a seminar to discuss the readings and possible research topics that follow from those readings. Students are expected to write a number of short papers and a final research design paper.

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POLSCI 662. Classical Theories of World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar attempts to provide students with a better understanding of current debates in the literature on world politics by placing them in the context of the evolution of international politics theory from traditional political philosophy through the twentieth century classics such as Carr, Wolfers, and Morgenthau to such contemporaries and near-contemporaries as Deutsch, Jervis, Organski, and Schelling.

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POLSCI 672. International Peace and Security Affairs.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul K Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/672/001.nsf

In this seminar we will study a number of theoretical and empirical issues related to understanding the national security policies of states. A broad range of topics will be covered including the theory and practice of deterrence and arms control, alliance behavior, coercive diplomacy, international peacekeeping operations, and the domestic sources of security policy. To address these topics empirical evidence will be drawn from US-Soviet security policy in the post-war period and European Great Power relations in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the security policies of Third World states.

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POLSCI 680. Proseminar in Behavioral Research Methods.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as an introduction to study design, strategies, data collection, and measurement in empirical political science. Emphasis is placed on eclecticism and demonstration by example. Oral presentations and discussion are a regular part of the course. Requirements include a series of brief papers plus a longer paper due at the end of the term, which usually takes the form of a complete, detailed, and polished research proposal.

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POLSCI 682. Democratization in Global Perspectives.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the basic literature and recent findings on democratization, starting with its background in Western advanced industrial societies and then examining its prospects in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, China, Latin America, and Africa. We will seek to answer three questions: "What are the essential characteristics of democracy?" "What conditions are conducive to the emergence and survival of democracy?" and "What good is it?"

Each participant will present three brief essays, each one being a critical discussion of the readings assigned during a given week. These are to be presented orally (in 10-15 minutes) in class during the week of the assignment, with appropriate handouts to guide the discussion; a typed version (4 to 6 pages) will be due the following week. Each of these essays will account for 25% of the final grade; the later essays should reflect a broader comparative perspective than the earlier ones. Well-informed participation in seminar discussions is important, and will count for 25% of the final grade. There will be no exams.

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POLSCI 685 / SOC 651. Proseminar in Electoral Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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POLSCI 686. Proseminar in Public Opinion.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce some of the basic literature and issues in the public opinion literature. Our larger purpose will be to gain an understanding of the relationship between public opinion and democracy. More specifically, we will focus on such topics as the nature of mass attitudes, the importance of ideology, the relative effects of self-interest versus group-interests versus symbolic interests on mass attitudes, the impact of news media on public opinion, and the importance of election campaigns. Most class meetings will involve both lecture and discussion. The purpose of the lecture will be to introduce students to new materials, and to bring them up-to-date on more recent research. The purpose of the discussion will be to exchange and test ideas on the persuasiveness of the readings.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 001 Foundations of Insitutional Analysis.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Institutions from formal mechanisms like separation of powers to informal ones such as culture coax, constrain, and provide opportunities to individuals. We cannot understand human political behavior without understanding the institutions that create their incentive environment. As such, much of the theoretical science of politics is about the study of institutions. But how much do we understand about them? This course will give us a chance to think about the function and design of institutions and their effect on individual and mass behavior. We will consider institutions as information providers, focal points, sanctioning devices, and veto gates. We will study classic problems such as institutional resolutions to collective action problems and the creation of stability through conflict. We then turn to dynamic problems such as institutional evolution, path dependence, and institutions as complex adaptive systems. We will think about institutional interdependence and the consequence of institutional imperfection. Our readings will include the work of Douglas North, Thomas Schelling, Jack Knight, Itai Sened, Russell Hardin, Herbert Simon, Kenneth Shepsle, Jim March, Elinor Ostrom, George Tsebelis, Jon Elster, and James Madison.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 002 War and Development.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tilly's famous aphorism "war made the state and the state made war" provides the starting point for this course. We will review Tilly's work, as well as that of other grand theorists, about the rise of states, and about the continuing political and economic development of states. We will then investigate how well such theories, based admittedly on the European experience, inform our understanding of the development of Third World states. A final topic will be state failure, highlighting recent research thereon. Readings will be drawn from history as well as from comparative and world politics. Students will have the option of writing a series of discussion papers over the course of the term or of undertaking a more ambitious longer paper project.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 003 Markets and States in East Asia.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/688/003.nsf

East Asia is an enormously heterogeneous and diverse area, and cannot be reduced to a single model of political economy. But as we think of the region historically and try to understand the complex interplay of forces historical, political, market, security that have determined the structure of opportunity in East Asia, it would appear that there are indeed three distinct paradigms of development in the region.

The first paradigm is the developmentalism of Northeast Asia, found in the countries that once formed the core of the prewar Japanese empire, and whose economic structures were tightly interwoven and articulated. These economies have tendencies that are manufacture and trade-oriented under multi-year plans, guided by strong state ministries and with deep security ties and trade dependence to the United States. The second paradigm consists of the economies of Southeast Asia, which was by and large subject to Western colonialism. Lacking historical manufacturing experience, these countries are more dependent on MNCs for their industrial development, with cross-national production networks playing a central role. The third paradigm is the mosaic that is the People's Republic of China, displaying some of the tendencies of the Northeast Asian and Southeast Asian paradigms. But it also grapples with the legacy of the heavy-industry strategies of state socialism since 1949, which may be obsolete but it continues to play an important welfare role.

Requirements: active class participation and a thirty page research paper.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 004 Politics of Federalism.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The economic interest in federalism concerns efficiency: what is the optimal distribution of powers between state and federal governments? How do we reduce the effects of negative externalities while encouraging positive ones? How centralized or decentralized should the government be? Who should collect taxes, and what taxes should they collect? Who spends? On what?

By contrast, the political science interest in federalism is based on feasibility and stability: does federalism promote domestic peace? International security? Can federalism overcome problems of ethnic conflict? What is the effect of asymmetrical federal bargains? How do you design institutions to make federalism work? What is the appropriate role of the court? Can voters effectively patrol multiple levels of government? What influence does federalism have on the party system?

This course will examine these two literatures to see how they have talked past one another and in what ways they might be encouraged to meet in order to promote a more effective theory of institutional design in federalism.

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POLSCI 691. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A directed reading on a topic of the student's choice.

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POLSCI 702. Selected Political Theorists.

Theory

Section 001 The Political Thought of Kant.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mmanty/702/

Although he is not primarily known as a political philosopher, Immanuel Kant (1724-1802) remains a continuous -- and continually revived influence on Western political thought. He was one of the key figures in the German (and general European) Enlightenment, the legacy of which continues to be debated in the 21st century. He stands at a crucial nexus maybe even the origin -- of a German theoretical lineage whose later figures include Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. His liberalism closely informs two of the most important liberal theories of the late 20th century, those of Jürgen Habermas and John Rawls. Contemporary debates about deliberative democracy or the democratic peace can be quickly traced to Kant. And so on. The purpose of this seminar is to offer a systematic introduction to the ideas behind that influence and to explore different approaches to Kant through secondary literature. We will first focus on Kant's political works and the theoretical and historical context in which they emerge, after which we will explore a variety of other theorists' interpretive approaches to Kant. The exploration of the secondary literature addresses the pedagogical goal of this seminar, viz. to introduce the participants to some of the styles and methods of research in political theory. Seminar assignments will also be geared to that end; assignments will incorporate the formats scholars practice in the profession of political theory: presentations, reviews, research proposals, etc. This isn't about form over substance, though; in this business, the two are inextricably connected.

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POLSCI 702. Selected Political Theorists.

Theory

Section 002 Karl Marx.

Instructor(s): Gordon N Harding

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on a continuous debate within socialism between the proponents of socialism as freedom and the advocates of socialism as material welfare. It argues that these two strands generated differing accounts of who we are, and how we know our world. They also tended to produce differing hierarchies of objectives and distinctive institutional forms. These two strands were often uneasily combined as in the pivotal case of Marx. Part of our concern will be to explore whether one strand or the other is more compatible with modernity.

The course is, in this sense, concerned with this basic question: do we necessarily sell part of our freedom for the security and prosperity that industrial society offers? We will look at these problems in tracing Marx's intellectual development, and then explore how they were refracted in the thought of some of his antecedents, disciples, and critics, for example Saint Simon, Bakunin, Sorel, Lenin, and Gramsci.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 703. Selected Approaches to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 Feminist Political Thought. Meets with Women's Studies 698.002.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth R Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to the study of gender as a political, philosophic, and cultural construct. Readings are drawn from a wide range of disciplines, while the primary focus of the course will be the intersection between feminist and political theory. At a minimum this means considering how critical attention to sexual difference complicates our understanding of power, justice, and the relationship between the two.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 711. Seminar in American National Government.

American

Section 001 Citizenship in the US.

Instructor(s): Cara J Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to provide students with an introduction to the empirical research literature on the politics of citizenship. Topics to be addressed include how citizenship is defined and changed by laws and public policies (particularly in regards to race, gender, and immigration status) as well as the historical debates surrounding the rights, responsibilities, and obligations that follow from membership in a political community. The focus will be primarily on the United States, although there will be some comparative cases as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 736 / PUBPOL 736. Poverty and Inequality.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Corcoran (marycor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/pubpol/736/001.nsf

See Public Policy 736.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 787. Multivariate Analysis.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson (jjacksn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 699 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2002/fall/polsci/787/001.nsf

This is an extension of PS 699. Topics covered include variations in coefficients, which is an application of generalized Least Squares; the identification and estimation of simultaneous equation models; factor analysis; models for limited dependent variables; and the general analysis of covariance structures(LISREL). Computer exercises are used extensively to illustrate the range of topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Comparative

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 891. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is required for all beginning graduate student instructors. It meets once for an extended period before the term starts and then for additional workshops/meetings during the Fall Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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