College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites: AMCULT 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department chair

AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: AMCULT 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 422.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department chair required.

AMCULT 433 / HISTART 431. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 433.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 — African-American Social Movements of the 20th Century. [4 credits]. Meets with History 397.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/amcult/496/001.nsf

See History 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2, 5: Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 — Harlem Renaissance. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.002.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson

Prerequisites: (3-4). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The world of African American writers and artists flourished as never before in the Harlem Renaissance or Negro Renaissance of the 1920s. This seminar aimed at juniors and seniors will first approach the Renaissance through such contexts of African American cultural and political history as urban migration (specifically to Harlem), the experience and aftermath of World War I for African Americans, and the radical challenges of Garveyism and socialism. However, we will focus most of our attention on an array of fascinating African American texts from the period especially novels, poems, manifestos, and songs. We will study non-fiction and literary writings by such key figures as W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, Alain Locke, James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Jean Toomer. Their creative texts will help us retrace historic Renaissance debates about the battle against white racism as fought in the fields of literature, art, and popular culture, contrasting visions of Black nationalism, separatism, and internationalism, the legacies of folk expression and the African cultural inheritance, and the political functions of African American art. We will also look to the importance of music and art for the Harlem Renaissance. Finally, the course will examine the aftermath of the Renaissance and the widespread radicalization of African American artists and intellectuals during the Great Depression of the 1930s as represented by the work of Richard Wright. While there are no prerequisites, it is expected that students will have taken done prior coursework related to the study of African American literature or culture in the first half of the twentieth century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Department

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 — Public Humanities, Public Arts: Citizenship, Communities, & Public Practice. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3-4). May be repeated for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/amcult/498/001.nsf

Have you been active in community service programs, taken community service learning courses, been involved in public projects or activism? What challenges do you face in integrating the public dimension of your work with your academic interests? How can we connect democratic public culture, scholarship, community institutions, and creative action?

This seminar is designed for students interested in developing a more complex and effective understanding of community-based work in the arts and humanities. In particular, it is designed for students who have been actively involved in community service learning programs and public projects. Students are invited to bring their own community-based work to the table during the intellectual explorations in this course. The seminar provides an opportunity to reflect on and develop an interdisciplinary context for your own public work.

The seminar combines a public orientation with rigorous reflection on the social importance of the arts and humanities. Central to the course are issues of cultural democracy, patriotism, performance, leadership, schools and youth, race and ethnicity. The seminar is organized around four large topics: public work; public language; public people. Each 'big idea' will be introduced through a case study of an outstanding cultural project that brought about significant change in a particular community.

Requirements include an unflinching commitment to the demands of a collaborative enterprise; sustained participation in all class sessions, as well as some required activities scheduled outside of class time; weekly reading assignments; weekly responses; and a final 'case study' project, which will take shape through a series of writing assignments and which will be presented orally to the seminar. In addition to stressing effective writing, the seminar puts a premium on effective speaking. Several regional cultural leaders will visit the seminar to talk about their work. Tuesdays will focus on ideas and concepts, Thursdays on case studies. Each week, one student will serve as "documentarian," serving as scribe and summarizing the previous day's discussion at the beginning of class. We will work from a course pack and from a selection of books. Readings include selections by, for example, Augusto Boal, Sekou Sundiata, Robin Kelley, Harry Boyte, Kristin Hass, Lucy Lippard, Paulo Freire, Dolores Hayden, Ralph Cintron, Ross Tallarico, Ngugi Wa Thiongo, Dana Gioia, Sharon Sutton, Roberta Uno, John Kuo Wei Tchen, Don Adams and Arlene Goldbard, Liz Lerman, Dudley Cocke, Richard Wood, Carmen Sirianni and Lewis Friedland, Tracy Kidder, Myles Horton.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 599. Methods in American Culture.

Section 001 — An Investigation into the Methodologies of American Studies. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Kristin Ann Hass

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in American Culture. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A required first-year bibliography course for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

AMCULT 614 / HISTORY 624. Asian American History.

Asian American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through extensive readings in Asian American history, this course will survey scholarship dating from the origins of ethnic studies in the 1960s to the present. Our discussions will focus on the following questions: How does the study of Asian Americans challenges historians to rethink issues of race, class, and gender? Why and how did the original vision of Asian American Studies emphasize social history and community studies? What have Asian American historians learned from interdisciplinary approaches? How have literary theory and cultural studies influenced recent and current work? What is the future direction of the field? (Note: Students without previous coursework in Asian American history are advised to read Ronald Takaki's Strangers From a Different Shore prior to the start of class.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 697. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary C Kelley (mckelley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Concentrates on a variety of ways of studying American society and its culture and provides an introduction to the conceptual frameworks and intellectual history of American Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 001 — Race and Narrative. Meets with English 649.001.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A delimited survey of narrative theory, this seminar utilizes narratology as a way of reading race, including whiteness, in America. In particular, we will explore the encounters between and among narratology, feminism, critical race theory, psychoanalysis, and historiography. Narratives by the following authors may be included: Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, James Weldon Johnson, Fae Ng, William Faulkner, Henry James, Michelle Cliff, Edith Wharton, Frederic Douglass, Jean Rhys, R. Zamora Linmark, Ana Castillo, James Baldwin, Hisaye Yamamoto, Nella Larsen, Sui Sin Far, Mark Twain, Audre Lord, Jessica Hagedorn, and Sigrid Nunez. Theorists will be selected from the following: William Andrews, Mikhail Bakhtin, Roland Barthes, Mieke Bal, Wayne C. Booth, Cleanth Brooks, Peter Brooks, Seymour Chatman, Jonathan Culler, Heather Dubrow, Henry Louis Gates, Gérard Genette, René Girard, Algirdas Julien Greimas, Cheryl Harris, Frederic Jameson, Susan Sniader Lanser, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Gerald Prince, Vladimir Propp, Peter Rabinowitz, Patricia Drechsel Tobin, Tzvetan Todorov, Marianna Torgovnick, Patricia Williams, and Sandra Zagarell. Seminar requirements include: 1-2 oral presentations, weekly discussion questions, an annotated bibliography, and an 8-10 page research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 002 — Made-Detroit:Art&Cult Motr Cit. Meets with HISTART 677.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 677.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 006 — Comparative Sexual Narratives: Africa & the Americas. Meets with History 698.003 & CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Mamadou Diouf

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

AMCULT 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 007 — In and out of the Burning House: James Baldwin's Transatlantic Passages. Meets with CAAS 558.003.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on close and interdisciplinary readings of major texts by James Baldwin — novels, short stories, essays, and political pamphlets. We will discuss this writer's craft in terms of genre, narrative technique, and thematic preoccupation in the context of American and African American literary and cultural traditions, as well as interrogating the history of, often contentious, scholarship and public reception of his work and contribution as an activist at home and abroad.

Our main theoretical preoccupation will be with the ways in which Baldwin's prose scripts/constructs (African) American identity as spatially contingent and as a function of such aspects of identity as "race," class, gender, sexuality, nationality in a trans-cultural, -national, and -linguistic context of the twentieth century. We will also discuss Baldwin's works as politically engaged in the representation and (de)construction processes of what Toni Morrison terms "literary whiteness" and "literary Blackness" in Playing in the Dark — the concepts that we will discuss in light of Baldwin's connection to Europe, his attention to social space and the erotic, and his life-long project of theorizing American national identity from a non-essentialist Black perspective.

The course will be taught in a seminar format, in a collaborative fashion, and will require serious participation from the students, who will be responsible for introducing and leading discussions of some of the material as part of their individual and group projects. Other requirements will include attendance of film showings and follow-up discussion leadership, as well as shorter written assignments and a term research paper.

Required texts:

  • James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain
  • ---, Going to Meet the Man (short stories)
  • ---, Another Country
  • ---, Giovanni's Room
  • ---, The Fire Next Time
  • ---, If Beale Street Could Talk
  • ---, The Price of the Ticket (essays) or another collection
  • ---, Just Above My Head
  • ---, Blues for Mister Charlie

Optional texts:

  • ---, No Name in the Street
  • James Campbell, Talkig at the Gates
  • David Leeming, James Baldwin: A Biography
  • Randall Kenan, James Baldwin: Lives of Notable Gay Men and Lesbians

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 850. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Primary Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 899. Special Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

AMCULT 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

AMERICAN CULTURE GSI ONLY.

Instructor(s): Catherine Elizabeth Daligga

Prerequisites: GSI award. Graduate Standing. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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