College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 6:19 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


ANTHRCUL 402. Chinese Society and Cultures.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 — The Anthropology of Twentieth-Century China.

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The twentieth century was a time of enormous change in mainland China: two revolutions, civil war, famine, cultural upheaval, and many episodes of massive economic, social, and political restructuring. What was life like in the twentieth century for farmers, urban people, men and women, and ethnic and cultural minorities? What are their lives like today? What were experiences of sex, food, work, religion, and family life, and how have these experiences been transformed? In the last five years, a new anthropological literature on China has begun to probe these questions in rich detail. We explore this literature in this seminar to build an understanding of daily life for China's diverse populations through the twentieth century and today. We also examine questions of method: how best can we study and understand the historical transformations of daily life? Students will participate actively in class, lead a class discussion, and write one short review paper and one research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 414 / CAAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 415. Andean Civilization.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Concentration in Anthropology. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/415/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marcia Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This medical anthropology course explores the field of global health, particularly the serious health problems facing Third World populations. The course provides an introductory survey of the basic issues and initiatives in international health over the past three decades, as well as in-depth case studies of four nations (Nepal, Haiti, Mali, Egypt). Five major areas of focus include:

  1. the history of international health development and bureaucracies;
  2. the political ecology of infectious disease;
  3. child survival;
  4. women's reproductive health; and
  5. men's health under "modernization."

The underlying purpose of the course is to develop students' awareness of the political, socioeconomic, and cultural complexity of health problems in so-called "developing" nations and the consequent difficulties of developing effective long-term solutions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 453 / CAAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women's rights, and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — The Colonial Order of Things in SE Asia. Meets with HISTORY 472.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar on the cultures of colonialism in Southeast Asia is not a regional course. We'll focus on the colonial perceptions, practices, and imperial contexts in which colonial ventures were pursued, and look at select colonial encounters in parts of Southeast Asia, particularly the Dutch East Indies/Indonesia, to address some of the major issues in the study of colonialism, and to familiarize students with the political and analytic dilemmas that arise in studying and identifying "the colonial" in postcolonial politics and in anthropology, history, and cultural studies today. We will examine the historical processes by which the categories of "colonizer" and "colonized" have been created by looking at gender politics, racial thinking, and class vision, with attention given to changes in colonial historiography, the interface of colonial power and the production of colonial knowledge. Undergraduates have the option of doing one book review and two essays, or one book review and a final exam. Graduate students are required to do the book review and a research paper. All students do short weekly commentaries on the readings. Readings are available in a course pack and at Shaman Drum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 — Language and Socialization. Meets with Linguistics 792.004, Psychology 457.002, and Cultural Anthropology 458.002.

Instructor(s): Marilyn Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu), Barbra Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 492.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 526. Traditions of Ethnology I.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a year-long sequence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Culture & Politics in the Contemporary Middle East. Meets with MENAS 695.001.

Instructor(s): Marcia C Inhorn

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Middle Eastern and North African Studies 695.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: LING 514 or graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/ling/542/001.nsf

See Linguistics 542.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology or biology. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/576/001.nsf

This course is an intensive introduction to theoretical issues in linguistics of special relevance to anthropologists, most of whose primary interests are outside of language. Think of language as a special kind of semiotic or cultural system. Our subject matter, then, consists of ways of approaching its formal description and the general issues (for the most part, about the nature of culture) that are raised by those approaches. Several such issues will continually crop up:

  1. The nature of cultural patterning and the means we use to describe it;
    is it possible to understand cultural patterning from the outside?
    How does our point of view change in the course of analysis?
  2. The possibility of cross-cultural comparison and typology using culturally-meaningful (or "emic") patterns as a basis;
    can general "laws of structure" of cultural form be constructed from descriptions of particular cultural systems?
  3. Are there true universals of culture?
    If universals do exist, what is their basis?
    Are they biologically determined, determined by the nature of the cultural code, or some combination of the two?
    What evidence is required to make sense of the question?
  4. What does it mean for individuals to share a culture?
    Does "sharing a culture" require collective representations?
    Are there any?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 611 / CAAS 616. Seminar on Contemporary African Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elisha P Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ANTHRCUL 619 / LACS 619 / HISTORY 617. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 — Mestizaje & National Identity.

Instructor(s): Sanjines, Julie Skurski

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lacs/619/001.nsf

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 619.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 625. Anthropological Approaches to Property and Property Rights.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery, Stuart A Kirsch

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/625/001.nsf

A significant area of change in the new global economy is in concepts of property and property rights. These topics — staples of past anthropological research and legal scholarship — promise to be at the forefront of work in the social sciences for the next decade. They are critical to the transformation of formerly socialist societies, questions of indigenous rights and heritage claims, environmental politics, studies of "the body," and numerous other issues. This course offers an overview of thinking about property, from an anthropological vantage point. We will read some political theory and early anthropological treatments of the topic, then turn to contemporary writing on the following: "privatization," cultural property, debates on "the common," and property in body parts. Requirements include regular class attendance/participation, and a term paper to be briefly presented at the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 629. Method and Interpretation in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. (1, 3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1, 3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing, to data collection and analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 640 / HISTORY 603. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 — Research Seminar: Anthropology, History, and the Politics of Comparison.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Core Seminar of the Doctoral Program in Anthropology and History provides a context to examine theory, methods and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on central questions of historiography, ethnography, and their mutual relations. It addresses anthropology's changing engagement with historical research and writing as well as history's involvement with anthropological methods and forms of analysis. This two-term course is mainly intended for students interested in developing projects that integrate historical and anthropological perspectives and methods.

The Winter or Methods Seminar centers on the intensive discussion of classical and important articles and monographs that participate in key moments in the dialogue between these two disciplines or productively question their disciplinary boundaries. This year the colloquium will especially look at new work on race, empire, gender, and the politics of comparison, and use the latter theme to think about possibilities of combining/contrasting methods and sources (as in ethnography, archives, and visual culture), and multiple and incongruous sites, contexts, and temporalities.

The Fall or Research Seminar focuses on the craft of writing, based on the careful discussion of papers produced by students taking the course or by invited guests.

The course may be taken as a two-term sequence, or as independent units. Papers written for this course may satisfy the Department of History's Research Seminar requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 — Ethnographic Genres: Socialism and After (former USSR).

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 — Meets with ANTRHRCUL 760.001 and PSYCH 808.006.

Instructor(s): Shinobu Kitayama, Hirschfeld

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 760.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ANTHRCUL 675. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001 — Language Ideology.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 576 or LING 411 and Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/675/001.nsf

"Language ideologies" are the conceptualizations people have about the languages, speakers, and discursive practices in their purview. Embedded in practices yet also reflexive of them, language ideologies are pervaded with political and moral interests, and are shaped in a cultural setting. To study language ideologies is to explore the nexus of language, culture, and politics — to examine the representations, whether explicit or implicit, that construe language's role in a social and cultural world, and that are themselves acts within it.

This course considers current topics and debates in the study of language ideologies, such as:

  • What should we mean by "ideology"?
  • In what ways are language ideologies positioned, with respect to the distribution of power and resources?
  • What are the sites of language ideologies — the practices in which they are enacted (and revealed)?
  • What is the role of language ideologies in organizing social identities, groups, boundaries, and activities?
  • How do language ideologies influence linguistic and social change?

We will consider these questions in the light of case materials from a wide range of ethnographic, historical, and linguistic settings.

The course is envisioned as a seminar. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in class discussion (including discussion-leading), some short written assignments, and a final paper, some version of which is also to be presented for group discussion during the last few weeks of the academic term. Readings will include substantial portions of: Eagleton, Ideology; Schieffelin, Woolard, & Kroskrity, eds., Language Ideologies; and Kroskrity, ed., Regimes of Language: Ideologies, Polities, and Identities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 — Meets with ANTHRCUL 658.003 and PSYCH 808.006.

Instructor(s): Shinobu Kitayama, Hirschfeld

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the content and function of knowledge may be strongly linked tot he types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ANTHRCUL 777. Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or a Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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