College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Asian Studies


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 002 — History of Hinduism.

Instructor(s): Donald R. Davis Jr. (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/455/002.nsf

How can Hinduism be both one of the oldest and one of the newest major religious traditions of the world? By examining the work of three periods in the history of Hindu Studies, we will trace the evolution of how we learn about Hinduism today and how our knowledge differs from early studies of the same religious tradition. The course will center on the differing sources available for studying Hinduism (ethnography, literature, epigraphy, colonial records, art, artifacts, etc.) and how these sources have been used or ignored by scholars, colonial officials, and politicians in India. Individualized library projects will play off the representative periods studied in class and will be designed to question the ways in which our knowledge of Hinduism is and has been organized and how that organization has affected both public and academic perceptions of Hinduism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 455. Topics in Asian Studies.

Section 003 — Jainism: Non-violence, Riches, and Renunciation.

Instructor(s): Donald R. Davis Jr. (drdj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/455/003.nsf

As one of the world's oldest religions, Jainism has often been described as an atheistic soteriology, or method of personal salvation. The intense religious, especially ascetic, discipline required of Jain monks and nuns is the most visible symbol of Jainism. The cardinal virtue in this ascetic regimen is ahimsa, or non-violence, which characterizes every action performed by Jain monks and nuns and is held as an ideal for Jain laypeople as well.

Given the emphasis on ascetic practice in Jainism, one may not expect many lay Jains to be wealthy merchants who own thriving trading businesses in some of India's largest cities. The contrast, and seeming contradiction, between ascetic ideals and prosperous lives within the theological, ritual, and social frameworks of Jainism will be the principal subject of this course. The early focus will be on Jain theology and philosophy, i.e., those concepts and world-views that Jain leaders have expounded and idealized since the founding of the tradition in the 5th century BC. The second part of the course will shift attention away from the conceptual and theological to the practical and ritual aspects of Jain life in India.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 457. Modernism and Modernity in East Asian Fiction.

Section 001 — Meets with RCCORE 334.001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Zwicker (jzwicker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/457/001.nsf

This course is designed as a 400 level seminar for advanced undergraduates as a well as for MA candidates affiliated with the International Institute's Centers for Chinese and Studies. While the course will generally follow a chronological sequence, each meeting will focus on a particular thematic issue ranging from problems such as 'The Novel and Homelessness' at the beginning of the course through problems related to 'Colonialism and its Aftermaths' and 'Lost Identities' in contemporary Asian writing. The course will serve at once to introduce students to the major authors of the modern tradition — from Natsume Soseki, Lu Xun, and Kim Tong-in to Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, and Shen Congwen — as well as to more recent writings by contemporary authors and writers of the Asian diaspora like Eileen Chang and Chang-Rae Lee. The aim of this course is to have undergraduates think critically and also comparatively about issues that have shaped and continue to shape cultural production in China, Korea, and Japan and to think about both the specificities of the literatures of the region as well as shared and interconnected experiences of modernity which broadly connect the cultures of the region during the twentieth century.

Course Requirements In addition to class attendance and participation, students will be expected to complete two papers (5-7 pages) and a take home examination consisting of five short essay questions to be answered in one page each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 — Visualizing Social Life in Edo. Meeting 10 weeks beginning on 10/1,10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 12/3, 12/10. Meets with History 590.002. (Drop/Add deadline=October 14).

Instructor(s): Reinhard Zoellner

Prerequisites: (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See 590.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 001 — Institutions, Technologies and the Production of South Asian Expertise. [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Mary Rader (mrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field of South Asian Studies is enormous and often unwieldy, encompassing multiple disciplines, geographical boundaries, institutional locations, historicities, languages, scripts. Because of this diversity, identifying, finding and evaluating sources can be both a daunting and difficult task. In this course, we will explore the organization and production of knowledge on South Asia, particularly as it pertains to students' specific research needs and concerns. The organization of knowledge will be explored through the use of tools such as bibliographies and indexes. The production of knowledge will be addressed via the examination of influential monographs, series and articles. By the end of the course, students will have gained significant skills to help them overcome the barriers of locating and organizing materials needed for their work as well as a confidence in referring to materials and research outside their own lines of inquiry.

The structure of the class is a basic seminar format organized around particular disciplines of South Asian Studies. Each week, we will analyze and discuss historic and current trends in the discipline as well as consult the relevant bibliographic research tools. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final bibliographical project. Examples of final projects are extensive subject bibliographies, shorter annotated bibliographies and descriptive essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 002 — Terrorism, Islam & the News Media. Meets with COMM 439.006 and 439.005.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Pintak

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/comm/439/005.nsf

See Communication Studies 439.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ASIAN 492. Topics in S&SEA Studies.

Section 003 — New Islam in Indonesia. [Credit?]

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department required.

ASIAN 500(650). Seminar in Asian Studies.

Section 001 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China. Meets with CCS 501.001 and SOC 895.001.

Instructor(s): James Lee (jkl@umich.edu) , Albert Park (alpark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chinese Studies 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ASIAN 532(CHIN 630). Seminar in Chinese Poetry.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses in Chinese

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 410. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/532/001.nsf

Poetry is one of the imperishable glories of traditional Chinese civilization. This proseminar is designed as an introduction for students who have some background in the classical language and the literature of China to the poetry from the Shijing or the Book of Songs through the poetry of the Song Dynasty (960-1279). The chief purpose of the course is to introduce students to the skills and methods of reading — and enjoying — classical Chinese poetry in the original, and to familiarize them with the range and depth of imagination and the lyrical beauty displayed in poems, the craft of poets, the evolving poetic language, and relevant trends in China's long cultural history. The course will also serve the purpose of strengthening students' competence in dealing with classical Chinese of which poetry constitutes a rich and essential component. Reading consists mainly of poetry in the original selected to illustrate the historical development of Chinese poetry. Some secondary sources in Chinese and English will also be assigned. Students are expected to participate in class discussion, to present short oral reports, and to submit one short paper in the form of a review of a book (written in English) on Chinese poetry and one substantial term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 535. Seminar in Chinese Science

Culture Courses/Literature Courses in Chinese

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Miranda Brown (mdbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is threefold. First, the course is intended to introduce graduate students to the major scholarly works and debates specific to the History of Chinese Science. Second, this course will familiarize students with the special approaches employed by historians of science. Third, this course will heighten awareness about the impact that the legacy of colonialism and the standard narrative of the Scientific Revolution have had on Western evaluations of Chinese science. Readings will cover scholarship on topics such as mathematics, logic, astronomy, alchemy, and medicine. In addition to reading works on Chinese science before 1900, students will also be asked to read some of the more important works in the History of Western science that have shaped approaches in the History of Chinese Science. Among the issues that we will consider include the reactions to the Needham thesis, problems of translation, and the role of political culture, social structure, and idiology in shaping (or inhibiting) the development of science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 550. Seminar in Cultural and Comparative Studies of Asia.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Zwicker, Henry H Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected up to three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/asian/550/001.nsf

The aim of this seminar is to introduce students to a set of topics relevant to the study of histories and cultures in Asia. Pairing readings in social theory with monographs that focus on East Asia, for the most part, this course seeks to introduce students to critical theories, and effective ways of using them in the study of histories and cultures across national boundaries in Asia.

Course Requirements:

The course will be conducted as a seminar. Students are expected to complete all the readings and to participate in class discussion.

Over the course of the term you will be asked to write at least three reaction papers, three pages in length. These papers should provide a concise rendering of the aims and argument of the text. Were those aims achieved, and was the argument compelling? You may call into question a particular point in the text that is intriguing or troubling, or suggest how this text raises larger questions for the study of Asia.

Toward the end of the semester, you will be asked to write a 15-page abstract/ proposal of a future research project. Your proposal should outline a problematic relevant to your field, and explore how that problematic might be approached. This proposal should include a succinct review of the relevant theoretical and secondary literature, and description of the primary sources to be examined.

Grading will be based on the quality of the reaction papers, classroom participation, and the proposal. Please be advised against falling behind in the course, as incompletes will not be given except in extraordinary circumstances.

Readings: Required Books (at Shaman Drum and on reserve):
1.Chakrabarty, Dipesh. Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. ISBN: 0691049092
2. Duara, Prasenjit. Rescuing History from the Nation: Questioning Narratives of Modern China. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. ISBN: 0226167224
3.Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities : Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Revised and extended edition, 2nd ed. New York: Verso, 1991. ISBN: 0860915468
4. Schmid, Andre. Korea Between Empires, 1895-1919. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. ISBN: 0231125399
5.Said, Edward W. Orientalism. Random House, 1979. ISBN: 039474067X
6. McClintock, Anne. Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest. Routledge, 1995. ISBN: 0415908906
7. Cohn, Bernard S. Colonialism and Its Forms of Knowledge. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. ISBN: 0691000433
8.Joshi, Priya. In Another Country: Colonialism, Culture, and the English Novel In India. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. ISBN: 0231125852
9.Althusser, Louis. Lenin and Philosophy. New York: Monthly Review Press, 2001. ISBN: 1583670394.
10.Liu, Lydia H., ed. Tokens of Exchange: The Problem of Translation in Global Circulations. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000. ISBN: 0822324245

Required Course Reader (at Accucopy) 518 E. William Street: (Tel: 769-8338)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 554(JAPANESE 554). Modern Japanese Literature.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses in Japanese

Section 001 — Showa Currents.

Instructor(s): Ken K Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 326 and 428. (3). May be elected up to three times for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will attempt to read some of the major texts from the rich, variegated, and often contradictory literary history of the early Showa period, the years from 1925 to 1945. The major cultural currents of this period — among them the expansion of mass consumer publishing and the popularization of "erotic grotesque nonsense," the arrival of the surrealist aesthetics of the New Sensationists, the rise of Proletariat Literature, the returns to Japan enacted by the Japanese Romantics, and the broad acceptance of war literature — present a diverse yet strangely interconnected cultural field. Our effort will be to read for both the contestations and conjunctions between high and low cultures, progressive and conservative ideologies, and modernist and neo-traditionalist literary movements as these are enacted in works by writers such as Edogawa Ranpo, Yoshikawa Eiji, Kawabata Yasunari, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Yasuda Yojuro, Kobayashi Hideo, and Hino Ashihei. The seminar will be organized so that readings may be done either in Japanese or in English translation; graduate students in fields other than Japanese literature are welcome to participate and upperclass undergraduates may register with the permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ASIAN 625(BUDDHST 625). Readings in Buddhist Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A critical survey of the field of Chinese Buddhism, focusing on seminal works in the field, as well as on new approaches to the study of Chinese Buddhist history, institutions, ritual, and doctrine. The course is intended for graduate students working in any area of East Asian history, literature, art history, religion, and so on.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 798. MA Essay SSEA Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Center MA Students. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and SSEA language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ASIAN 799. Master's Essay in Japanese Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Master's student in Asian Studies. Graduate Standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students electing the thesis track must complete the Master's Essay. The Master's Essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use Western language literature and Japanese language sources. The thesis is usually undertaken in the last term of the degree program, under the supervision of two Center faculty. Students in the joint degree programs should refer to the appropriate sections in the CJS handbook for additional requirements specific to their program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ASIAN 990. Dissertation Research — Precandidate

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and ermission of instructor required. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected up to four times for credit. This course replaces JAPANESES 990, CHIN 990, and BUDDHST 990. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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