College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Archaeology


This page was created at 6:19 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


CLARCH 422 / HISTART 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Etruscans have long been seen as a mysterious people, their origins shrouded in myth and their language indecipherable. The popular perception of this fascinating group, who occupied central Italy through much of the first millennium B.C., overlooks the vast amount of information we now have. Recent archaeological scholarship and the translation of the language have provided us with rich insights into Etruscan society and customs. This course will examine the origins and history of the Etruscan peoples; their art, religion, and way of life; their interactions with the Greeks and Romans; and their legacy through time. We will be studying Etruscan artistic creations in a wide range of media, including sculpture, wall paintings, architecture and ceramics, that served as outward expressions of this unique and vibrant civilization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 424 / HISTART 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Rome's empire was remarkable in its size and diversity, covering a vast area from the rainy forests of northern Europe to the deserts of North Africa and Arabia and from the shores of the Atlantic to deep into western Asia. The empire thus encompassed a heterogeneous, mutable, and potentially combustible mix of cultures, languages, and ways of life. How did one city govern these farflung territories? This course examines the violent formation of the empire and the subsequent history of the provinces. While the empire may have been consolidated through sheer force, more subtle modes of cooption were required to maintain it. Rome's methods of governance were adjusted to suit the unique circumstances of particular provinces with varying degrees of success. In this course, we will look at the consequences of imperial rule for the conquered peoples, and their responses to it. Through the archaeological and historical evidence from key provinces, we will examine the nature of Roman provincial life, tracing how the struggles for freedom, power and property played out in various ways around the empire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CLARCH 443 / HISTART 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and CLARCH 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Movements of people between different parts of the world, and the consequent meeting of contrasting cultures are a familiar aspect of modern society. But what about the Greek world? How much did Greeks travel and live outside Greece itself? Where did they go? What did they find when they got there? What kind of settlements did they build? And how different was colonial society from the society of Greece itself?

This course will explore the flow of Greek settlers to distant lands and address these questions. We shall look in detail at some of the areas Greek populations moved to, ranging from Asia Minor and the Black Sea region in the east, through southern Italy and Sicily, to France and North Africa in the west. The chronological range of the course will be from the eighth to the mid-fourth centuries B.C. Key issues we will address will be the motivation for the colonization movement, and the nature of relationships between Greeks and indigenous peoples of the areas where new settlements were founded.

Textbook: Boardman, J. 1999. The Greeks Overseas. London, Thames and Hudson. (Fourth Edition.) Price: $22:50.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 536 / HISTART 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or CLARCH 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 536.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

CLARCH 600. Proseminar in Classical Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In order to nurture common and complementary intellectual interests within the broad field of Classical Archaeology, and to introduce students to the resources of the University and faculty members both within and outside IPCAA, IPCAA offers a Proseminar each Fall Academic Term. This is a required course, for one credit, for every incoming student (even those with a Master's degree from another institution). The Proseminar is organized by the IPCAA Director, but is team-taught by faculty from all of the departments participating in the Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 815 / HISTART 815. Hellenistic Cities of the Near East.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course on Hellenistic Cities of the Near East.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CLARCH 844 / HISTART 844. Theoretical Issues in Archaeology.

Section 001 — Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Greek Oikos.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many of our most vivid images of the Greek world are to be found in the numerous scenes on painted pottery that appear to show, not great battles or civic occasions, but the minutiae of everyday life — a world enclosed within the walls of the oikos. For us, the attraction of these scenes is enhanced by the strict privacy accorded to the oikos in surviving written sources, which barely offer a glimpse into this interior world. But how can we understand such images: can they be taken at face value, or do they need more careful interpretation? And how can we successfully explore the way a Greek oikos actually worked? Starting from these issues of how we interpret the different types of evidence, the seminar will explore a variety of aspects of the oikos as a physical and a social unit. Precise topics can be formulated to reflect the interests of participants, but might include the earliest origins of the Classical oikos, the character of the oikos at different levels of society, the response of the oikos to external influences (political, social, cultural), similarities and contrasts between oikoi in different parts of the Greek world, the fate of the Classical oikos into the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and ways in which studying the oikos might illuminate broader patterns of social relationships and institutions (for example relations between the two sexes, the character and development of the symposium). Evaluation will be based on class presentations, class participation, and written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

CLARCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

CLARCH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CLARCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for CLARCH.


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