College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Economics


This page was created at 6:31 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


ECON 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001 — EVENING EXAMS ON OCT 2 & NOV 6, 8-10 PM.

Instructor(s): Janet Gerson (jgerson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the theoretical analysis of consumers, firms, markets, and price determination. The analysis is rigorous, using the tools of algebra, geometry, and elementary calculus in constructing models. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. ECON 401 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is not recommended that ECON 401 and 402 be taken in the same term. Lecture and section both meet twice a week.

If the course closes, the waitlist for the course will be the waitlist for section 002. Overrides will be given after lecture the first day of class. If a section closes and a student drops that section, the section will reopen. If you are on the waitlist, you should watch Wolverine Access in case another student drops and that space becomes available.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ECON 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/402/001.nsf

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. It is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s), written exercises, and final exam. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Stanley Anthony Sedo (sasedo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102 and MATH 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 405 or STATS 350, 265, 311, 350, 400, 405, or 412. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/404/100.nsf

ECON 404 is an introduction to statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference, and an introduction to regression analysis. Grades are determined by problem sets and exams. There are two lectures and one problem set per week. The course is self-contained and does not serve as a prerequisite to ECON 406.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Stanley Anthony Sedo (sasedo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102 and MATH 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 405 or STATS 350, 265, 311, 350, 400, 405, or 412. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/404/200.nsf

ECON 404 is an introduction to statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference, and an introduction to regression analysis. Grades are determined by problem sets and exams. There are two lectures and one problem set per week. The course is self-contained and does not serve as a prerequisite to ECON 406.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 405 / STATS 405. Introduction to Statistics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MATH 116. Juniors and seniors may elect this course concurrently with ECON 101 or 102. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect ECON 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for economics concentrators but is sufficiently general to serve non-economics concentrators as well. The emphasis is on understanding rather than on "cookbook" applications. Students are expected to know basic algebra and basic calculus. Since the course emphasizes the foundations of statistical inference, it is recommended that after finishing the course students elect ECON 406 or a similar course in the Statistics department to gain experience with applications and computational methods.

This course is designed for quantitatively oriented students who are comfortable with abstract concepts and mathematical techniques. Students who prefer a broader, less rigorous approach to statistics should elect ECON 404. Evaluation of students in the course is based on examinations and homework assignments. There are three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion per week. ECON 405 is a prerequisite for ECON 406 (Econometrics).

Principles of statistical inference, including: probability, experimental and theoretic derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 409. Game Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hector Chade (hchade@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MATH 217. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/409/001.nsf

Game Theory aims to help us understand situations in which decision-makers interact. It has become a standard methodology in Economics. This course provides a rigorous introduction to the main concepts of Game Theory and its applications. It covers the standard ways of representing games and the main concepts to analyze static and dynamic strategic settings, with complete or incomplete information. It also covers some of the most important economic applications of game-theoretic reasoning, including competition in oligopolistic markets, trade policy, bargaining, contracting situations, auctions, and signalling in labor markets.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 411. Monetary and Financial Theory.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. ECON 404 or 405. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/411/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 412. Topics in Macroeconomics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001 — Growth, Fluctuations, and Inflation.

Instructor(s): Robert B Barsky (barsky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/412/001.nsf

This course analyzes long-run and short-run macroeconomic phenomena from a viewpoint that combines theory, data, and history. Probable topics are: growth theory and cross-country comparisons; variations in productivity growth; long swings in stock prices; the quantity theory and alternative theories of the price level; time series and cross-sectional evidence on inflation; the German hyperinflation; the gold standard; The Great Depression; The Great Stagflation of the 1970's; macroeconomic implications of oil price changes; the Phillips curve; the stabilization of U.S. inflation in the 1980s and 1990s; "consumer confidence" and recent recessions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 418. Business Cycles.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Miles S Kimball (mkimball@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

ECON 418 examines modern business cycle theories that emphasize dynamics, rational expectations and maximization, including Real Business Cycle and New Keynesian theories. ECON 401 and 402 are both strongly recommended as prerequisites, since modern business cycle theories give a microeconomic foundation to macroeconomics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 421. Labor Economics I.

Labor Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Lich-Tyler (swlt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course discusses the economics of labor supply and demand, wage and employment determination, and investment in education and training. The course develops microeconomic models of the labor market, presents relevant empirical evidence, and discusses applications to such policy issues as the work incentive effects of income maintenance programs and the employment effects of minimum wage legislation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 431. Industrial Organization and Performance.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dmitriy L Stolyarov (stolyar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~stolyar/Class/Econ431/econ431.htm

This is a theoretical course in modern industrial organization. Many real-world firms are trying to manipulate their rivals or consumers. We will study the functioning of the markets by analyzing behavior of non-competitive firms. We will learn the tools of microeconomics and game theory to develop strategic thinking and understand how firms make their decisions. We will use these theoretical insights to explain observed features of particular markets and industries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ECON 432. Government Regulation of Industry.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/432/001.nsf

This course describes and analyzes the efforts of governments to control the market power of business enterprises. Topics include dominant position, oligopolistic cooperation, vertical restraint, and merger. Emphasis is placed on American policies, especially antitrust law and regulation by administrative commission. ECON 431 is not required. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions.

Textbooks:

  • Industrial Economics: Economic Analysis & PP 2nd ed Martin, Stephen Prentice Hall 0-02-376786
  • Economics of Regulation and Antitrust 3rd edViscusi, VernonMIT Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 435. Financial Economics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. ECON 404 or 405. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/435/001.nsf

The financial economics course provides the student with an examination of a wide array of financial instruments and institutions in today's global marketplace. Students who take this course will develop an understanding of the numerous money-market and capital market instruments and rates, the determinants of equity and bond values, and the workings of various financial markets. Financial derivatives, specifically futures and options, are introduced, and their relationship to portfolio management and hedging strategy is analyzed.

The course introduces the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Markowitz diversification, duration and bond portfolio management, and the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. As part of the coursework, you will apply the concepts presented in class and investigate the fundamental components that determine the value of major U.S. corporations.

Text: Capital Markets: Institutions and Instruments, 2nd ed., Fabozzi & Modigliani.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 441. International Trade Theory.

International Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Hallak (hallak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/441/001.nsf

This course deals with the theory of international trade. It explores the main theories that explain what countries trade and why they gain from trade. These theories include the theory of comparative advantage and the factor-proportions theory of trade, as well as more recent theoretical developments. The course also deals with several other related topics, such as empirical tests and applications of trade theory, the theory of trade policy, preferential trading arrangements, international factor movements, and trade and economic development. The course makes intensive use of analytical tools, in particular using graphs and mathematical expressions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 442. International Finance.

International Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ECON 402 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/442/001.nsf

The course covers two broad topics:

  1. Fiscal and monetary policy in an open economy

    This part of the course centers on the Mundell-Flemming model. Fiscal and monetary policy under flexible and fixed exchange rates.
    Interaction between economic policies and capital mobility.
    Conflicts of interests between the Central Bank and the Treasury.

  2. Saving, investment and the balance of payments

    The discussion here is based on a simple intertemporal framework.
    The households decide on consumption and saving and the firms decide on investment and capital accumulation.
    The effects of government spending, taxation and deficits on national saving and the balance of payments.

The course is based on class notes. For the second topic, two classes will be devoted to reviewing background material on basic optimization.

HOMEWORK
There will be four or five problem sets during the semester.

EVALUATION
The grade will be based on (i) a midterm exam (30%), to be held on Thursday October 21st during class time, (ii) homework (15%), and (iii) a final exam (55%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 454. Economics of Japan.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001 — Reading knowledge of Japanese required.

Instructor(s): Gary R Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Analysis of Japan's economic organization, structure, and performance. Special emphasis is placed on the character of Japanese economic policy making and the behavior of Japanese enterprises and financial institutions, the Japanese labor force, and the Japanese household. There also will be ample discussion of Japan's international economic relations and its current macroeconomic and structural problems. The course will have a lecture format, but questions are welcome. The course grade will be determined by two one-and-one-half hour examinations and a final. Please note that the Fall 2003 offering of Economics 454 will be different from the course that has been offered in the past. The reading list for this course will be made up of items written in Japanese. The traditional version of ECON 454 which makes use only of English language reading materials will be offered in Winter 2004. Lectures, classroom discussion, and examinations in both versions of ECON 454 are in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 461. The Economics of Development I.

Economic Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 360. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Most people live in "poor countries" with much lower average incomes (as well as worse health and education indexes) than the United States and other "rich countries", and this disparity has generally continued to widen. This course explores alternative conceptions of economic development, investigates proposed explanations for international variations, and critically examines competing strategies for alleviating global poverty and enlarging opportunities for human flourishing, especially for those who are worst off. A further focus is potential implications of global development in the more developed countries.

The main textbook for the course is Development Economics by Debraj Ray (Princeton University Press).

Evaluation for the course is based on midterm and final examinations and two papers, a short paper (c. 1,250 words) early in the course and a longer term paper (c. 3,000 words). The short paper treats a currently controversial development economics topic; the term paper (focused on a less developed country of the student's choice) is a research-based policy recommendation paper.

Class discussion both in the classroom and on the class email group list is very strongly encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ECON 466. Economics of Population.

Economic Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Lam (davidl@umich.edu), Murray Victor Leibbrandt (mleibbr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/~davidl/econ466

This course uses an economic perspective to analyze the dramatic changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in recent decades in both industrialized and developing countries. In Fall 2003 the course will include a special focus on poverty and inequality in developing countries, with a particular emphasis on South Africa and Brazil. The course will be co-taught by Professor Murray Leibbrandt, one of South Africa's leading economists, who is a visiting professor at UM in 2003. The course will include a computer lab component built around statistical analysis of household survey data. Students will use the statistical package Stata to analyze demographic and economic change in South Africa and other countries, applying recent innovations in the application of microeconomic theory and econometrics to the analysis of demographic behavior, labor markets, poverty, and inequality. Topics include: economic and demographic analysis of rapid population growth; measuring and analyzing poverty and inequality; fertility, investments in children, and intergenerational transmission of inequality; household dynamics and the labor market; education and earnings; economics of fertility and marriage; impact of changing age structure on social security systems. Coursework includes: computer-based problem sets and writing exercises; a paper based on computer analysis of household survey data; written midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ECON 466. Economics of Population.

Economic Development

Section 002.

Instructor(s): David Lam (davidl@umich.edu), Murray Victor Leibbrandt (mleibbr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/~davidl/econ466

This course uses an economic perspective to analyze the dramatic changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in recent decades in both industrialized and developing countries. In Fall 2003 the course will include a special focus on poverty and inequality in developing countries, with a particular emphasis on South Africa and Brazil. The course will be co-taught by Professor Murray Leibbrandt, one of South Africa's leading economists, who is a visiting professor at UM in 2003. The course will include a computer lab component built around statistical analysis of household survey data. Students will use the statistical package Stata to analyze demographic and economic change in South Africa and other countries, applying recent innovations in the application of microeconomic theory and econometrics to the analysis of demographic behavior, labor markets, poverty, and inequality. Topics include: economic and demographic analysis of rapid population growth; measuring and analyzing poverty and inequality; fertility, investments in children, and intergenerational transmission of inequality; household dynamics and the labor market; education and earnings; economics of fertility and marriage; impact of changing age structure on social security systems. Coursework includes: computer-based problem sets and writing exercises; a paper based on computer analysis of household survey data; written midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ECON 471 / NRE 571. Environmental Economics.

Environmental Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Klaas T Van't Veld (kvtveld@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-, or NRE 570; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/471/001.nsf

This course is a three-part introduction to the economics of environmental policy.

The first part of the course examines the different, and often conflicting, goals of environmental policy, including not just economic efficiency, but also sustainability, safety, and equity.

The second part compares the four main policy tools used in practice to achieve those goals, namely:

  1. imposing taxes on pollution,
  2. setting standards on allowable emissions,
  3. issuing tradable pollution permits, and
  4. holding polluters legally liable for environmental damages.

Also, a new policy measure is discussed that has recently become popular, namely:

  1. simply making information about the pollution available to the public.

The third part covers miscellaneous topics in environmental economics, such as the economics of biodiversity, the environmental effects of trade and development, and the economics of global warming.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 476 / CAAS 457. Political Economy of Black America.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 101. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/476/001.nsf

See CAAS 457.001.

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ECON 481. Government Expenditures.

Public Finance

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julianne Berry Cullen (jbcullen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or graduate standing. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 380. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~jbcullen/econ481.html

ECON 481 studies the role of government in the economy. Topics covered include public goods, collective choice, externalities, income redistribution, and social insurance. In considering these topics, emphasis will be placed on both theoretical issues and applications to current policy. The course format will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated based on performance on problem sets and exams. A solid grounding in microeconomics and practice with mathematical optimization will make the course more accessible.

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ECON 499. Independent Research.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the economics concentration advisor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. No more than four credits may be used in an economics concentration program. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ECON 500(553). Quantitative Methods.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dmitriy L Stolyarov (stolyar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~stolyar/Class/Econ553/econ553.htm

Many real-world decision problems look impossibly complex. Mathematics is a language for translating these problems into concise, exact and logical framework. The use of mathematics enables economists to describe and solve the problems that cannot be tackled effectively in any other way. A modern economist must know how to turn economic problems into mathematical problems, how to solve them, and how to interpret the results.

The course will focus on general techniques of solving several important classes of mathematical problems frequently encountered in economics. In the first part of the course, we will learn the language of mathematics: how to manipulate mathematical objects such as sets, functions, graphs, derivatives, equations and matrices. The second part will describe the basic techniques of solving the systems of equations and finding the maxima of functions. The third part will introduce probability theory and elements of statistical inference.

Textbooks: Klein, Michael W., Mathematical Methods for Economics, 2nd edition, Addison Wesley, ISBN 0-201-72626-2.

Course requirements: There will be two midterm exams and a final exam. Each exam will account for 25% of your grade. You will be assigned problem sets on each topic we cover. You are strongly encouraged to work through them to see how well you keep up with the course. Problem sets will not be graded, but almost each Wednesday (see specific dates below) I will give a 15-minute quiz with similar problems. Best six out of nine quizzes will jointly account for the remaining 25% of your grade. i

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 501. Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet S Netz

Prerequisites: ECON 401. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/501/001.nsf

This course is designed for students in the MAE program. Basic models in the principal areas of microeconomic theory are covered: consumer demand, production and costs, product markets, factor markets, market efficiency, and market failure. The goal of the course is to teach students who to apply these tools to the analysis of specific microeconomic policy problems. This is done through class examples and through a term paper on a public policy issue of the student's choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 540 / PUBPOL 540. International Economic Policy.

International Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): L. Tajoli

Prerequisites: PUBPOL 555. Presumes prior or concurrent knowledge of intermediate macroeconomics. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 540.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ECON 599. Special Tutorial.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Special topics course developed by individual faculty members and offered as requested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ECON 600. Math for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Susman Silverman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Highly recommended for students taking ECON 601 and required for all Ph.D. students in Economics. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/600/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to the mathematics used in contemporary economics. The course is tailored to first-year students in the Economics Ph.D. program, and has two purposes: (1) to provide students with some mathematical tools that will be useful both for graduate courses and for research, and (2) to (re)acquaint students with the mathematical rigor and problem solving necessary for studying economic theory.

Required Texts:

  • Simon and Blume, Mathematics for Economists, W.W. Norton & Co.: New York, 1994. (S&B)
  • Leonard and van Long, Optimal Control Theory and Static Optimization in Economics, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 1992. (L&vL)
  • Lecture notes will also be provided as the course progresses.

Other Texts Useful but NOT Required for this Course:

  • Takayama, Mathematical Economics, 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 1985.
  • Michel and Herget, Applied Algebra and Functional Analysis, Dover: New York, 1993.
  • Rudin, Principles of Mathematical Analysis, 3rd edition, McGraw-Hill: New York, 1976.
  • Stokey, Lucas, and Prescott, Recursive Methods In Economic Dynamics, Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA, 1989.

Requirements: During the summer session there will be problem sets and one exam. During the fall session, there will be regular problem sets, one midterm exam and a final exam. The problem sets can, and should, be worked on in groups, though each student is required to turn in his or her own problem set. Problem sets are due at the beginning of class. Late problem sets will not be accepted. The grading weights are as follows:

Problem sets15%
Summer exam10%
Midterm exam30%
Final exam45%

The following (optimistic) schedule will guide us. In the course, we will undoubtedly skip over some of this material, and cover additional material that is not in the texts but will be in the lecture notes.

  1. Part I: Linear Algebra
    • Systems of Linear Equations, and Lin ear Transformations (S&B Ch. 7 & 13.3)
    • Matrices and Matrix Algebra (S&B Ch. 8)
    • Determinants (S&B Ch. 9)
    • Euclidean Spaces (S&B Ch. 10)
    • Linear Independence (S&B Ch. 11)
  2. Part II: Multivariate Analysis
    • Sequences, Limit s, and Open Sets (S&B Ch. 12)
    • Functions of Several Variables (S&B Ch. 13.1-5)
    • Quadratic Forms and Definite Matrices (S&B Ch. 16)
    • Calculus of Several Variables (S&B Ch. 14)
    • The Implicit Function Theorem (S&B Ch. 15)
  3. Part III: Static Optimization with Calculus Techniques
    • Convex Sets and Separation Theorems (Lecture Notes)
    • Concave, Quasi-concave and Pseudo Concave Functions (S&B Ch. 21)
    • Existence and Uniqueness of Optimal Solutions (S&B Ch. 30)
    • Unconstrained Optimization (S&B Ch. 17)
    • Constrained Optimization and the Envelope Theorem (S&B Ch. 18 and 19)
    • Concave Programming (S&B Ch. 21.5)
    • Parametric Continuity and the Maximum Theorem (Lecture Notes)
    • Fixed Point Theorems (Lecture Notes)
  4. Part IV: Preliminaries on Dynamics
    • Difference Equations (S&B Ch. 23) Ã Ordinary Differential Equations (S&B Chs. 24 and 25)
  5. Part V: Dynamic Optimization
    • Dynamic Programming (Lecture notes)
    • Maximum Principle (L&vL Chs. 3 and 4)
    • Constrained Optimal Control (L&vL Ch. 6)
    • Transversality Conditions (L&vL Ch. 7)

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ECON 601. Microeconomic Theory I.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001 — MEETS SEPT 3 - OCT 22. (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): Lones A Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 600, Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1.5). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1.5).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/601/001.nsf

This is the first required microeconomic theory course for doctoral students, studying single agent decision-making by individuals, consumers, firms. Both ordinal and cardinal theories are developed. Students are expected to be comfortable with multi-variable calculus including optimization as well as to follow and replicate simple proofs involving basic algebra and logic. Students emerge desiring but as yet unable to scale ice cliffs with their bare hands.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 602. Microeconomic Theory II.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001 — MEETS OCT 23 - DEC 10. (Drop/Add deadline=November 5).

Instructor(s): Lones A Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 601. (1.5). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1.5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introduction to game theory is the second required doctoral microeconomic theory course. Topics: Strategic and extensive form games of complete and incomplete information, and their associated equilibrium concepts from rationalizability, through Nash and Subgame perfect equilibrium, sequential equilibrium, and the intuitive refinement. We study examples from auctions, dynamic social interaction, bargaining, timing games, and job market signalling. Students emerge from the course able to scale ice cliffs with their bare hands.

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ECON 607. Macroeconomic Theory II.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher L House (chouse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 600. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Addresses topics that include models of aggregate supply and business cycles (rational expectations, new Keynesian, real business cycles, coordination failure and multiple equilibrium), money supply and demand, investment and consumption demand and their relationship to financial markets, and fiscal and monetary policy. The primary emphasis of the course is on understanding different models, their interrelationship, and empirical evidence, but new analytic tools are developed and applied as needed.

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ECON 611. Stabilization Policy.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Miles S Kimball (mkimball@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 602 and 604; 611. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with recent developments in macroeconomic theory. Particular attention is given to the application of the techniques of optimal control to Real and New Keynesian business cycle theory. Other likely topics include New Keynesian foundations, imperfect competition macroeconomics, q-theory, monetary and financial theory, growth theory, efficiency wages, Ricardian equivalence, precautionary saving, and Stochastic optimization.

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ECON 617(618). Game Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lones A Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, and 609. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An advanced game theory course. Topics include: solution concepts, (iterated dominance, rationalizability, Nash equilibrium, subgame perfection, sequential equilibrium), infinitely repeated games (dynamic programming, self-generation, stick-and-carrot punishments, renegotiation folk theorems), evolutionary game theory (evolutionary stable strategies, replicator dynamics, adaptive play), games with incomplete information (revelation principle, single crossing property, mechanism design), and bargaining theory. Many examples illustrate these concepts: Vickrey auctions, signalling games, entry-deterrence, oligopolistic supergames, optimal auction design, and non-linear pricing.

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ECON 621. Labor Economics I.

Labor Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Bound (jbound@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 601, 603, 673, 674; and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Develops theoretical models of the labor market, presents related empirical research, and discusses policy application. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, market equilibrium and compensating wage differentials, investment in human capital, and cyclical unemployment.

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ECON 631. Industrial Organizations and Public Policy.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 601 and 603 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/631/001.nsf

This course covers both theoretical and empirical analyses of industrial organization. The primary focus will be on the theory of firm, market power, strategic interactions, and empirical test of the predictions of economic theories. Topics in empirical analyses will require the knowledge of some statistical packages (such as SAS, STATA, TSP, etc. STATA is recommended.)

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ECON 641. International Trade Theory.

International Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Hallak (hallak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 601 and 603. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/econ/641/001.nsf

This course deals with the microeconomic aspects of international economics. Specific topics covered include theories of international specialization and exchange, trade policy and economic welfare, international factor movement, trade and growth, under both perfect competition and imperfect competition, and selected problems of trade policy in the international trading system. For most topics, both theoretical and empirical results from the literature are examined.

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ECON 663 / HISTORY 622. European Economic History.

Economic History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Covers the historical evolution of modern economic institutions. While specific topics covered vary from year to year, they typically include most of the following: the evolution and performance of the firm, the changing structure and role of financial institutions, the evolution of the terms of labor contracts and institutions, the changing role of the family in economic development, and the evolution of contract law and economic planning. Consideration also is given to cross-country comparison.

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ECON 665. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Countries.

Economic Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew M Coleman (coldman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines microeconomic issues in economic development, focusing on modeling approaches and empirical applications. Topics include household decision-making, including risk-coping strategies, technology adoption, migration, intra-household economics, and health and nutrition; and rural institutions such as sharecropping, interlinked contracts, land tenure arrangements, group-lending and rotating credit schemes, and public employment projects for the poor.

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ECON 669. Economy of Japan.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary R Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 501, 502, and 571; graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Structure and performance of the Japanese economy during the past 100 years. Particular emphasis is placed on the microeconomic analysis of distinctive Japanese corporate, government, and household institutions. Post-1945 Japanese economic performance is set within the context of changing global comparative advantage.

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ECON 671(673) / STATS 505. Econometric Analysis I.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Statistics 505.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor required.

ECON 676. Applied Macroeconometrics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ECON 671 and 672; Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to equip students with a working knowledge of important econometric techniques used in monetary economics, financial economics, international economics, and econometric theory. The centerpiece of this course is the vector auto-regressive model. The course is divided into six parts: (1) a review of the foundations of time series econometrics; (2) detrending models: restricted and unrestricted estimation of stationary vector auto-regressive and moving-average methods: asymptotic, bootstrap and Bayesian inference; model selection and specification tests, forecasting; exogeneity and Granger causality; tests of forecast encompassing and tests of equal forecast accuracy; impulse response analysis, variance decompositions and historical decompositions; (3) estimation and inference in the presence of trends, structural change and unit roots in univariate models; (4) spurious regressions, unbalance regressions and cointegration; (5) identification problems and the relationship between structural and reduced form models; and (6) estimation and inference for structural dynamic macroeconomic models and their relationship to vector auto-regressive models.

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ECON 683. Government Expenditures.

Public Finance

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julianne Berry Cullen (jbcullen@umich.edu), Daniel Susman Silverman

Prerequisites: ECON 601. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~jbcullen/econ683.html

Emphasizes theory and evidence on government expenditure policy. Topics covered include the theory of public goods, state and local public goods, welfare economics and income redistribution, political economy and voting mechanisms, and the design and evaluation of social insurance programs.

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ECON 695. Introduction to Economic Research I.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julianne Berry Cullen (jbcullen@umich.edu) , Robert B Barsky (barsky@umich.edu) , Stephen W Salant (ssalant@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce third-year graduate students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as identifying a relevant research idea, but most of the effort will be involved in research group meetings, presentations, and writing the research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 700. Research.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Particular topics course developed by individual faculty member and offered as requested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ECON 739 / PUBPOL 747. Topics in International Economic Policy.

International Economics

Section 001 — International Macro/Financial Problems and Policies Meets Sept. 2 - Oct. 15. [2 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): Stern

Prerequisites: ECON 542 and Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 747.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 739 / PUBPOL 747. Topics in International Economic Policy.

International Economics

Section 002 — Issues and Options for Multilateral, Regional, and Bilateral Trade Liberalization. Meets Oct. 22 - Dec 10. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Stern

Prerequisites: ECON 542 and Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 747.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

ECON 811(711). Seminars in Monetary Theory.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Shapiro (shapiro@umich.edu) , Christopher L House (chouse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Monetary Theory are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 821. Seminars in Labor Economics.

Labor Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles C Brown (charlieb@umich.edu) , John Bound (jbound@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Labor Economics are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Economic History

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ECON 831(731). Seminars in Public Policy toward Business.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu) , Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Public Policy toward Business are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 835. Seminar in Natural Resource Economics.

Environmental Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Klaas T Van 't Veld (kvtveld@umich.edu) , Stephen W Salant (ssalant@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Natural Resource Economics are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor required.

ECON 841. Research Seminar in International Economics.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alan V Deardorff (alandear@umich.edu) , Linda L Tesar (ltesar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Research Seminar in International Economics is a University of Michigan center that is operated jointly by the School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics. It was founded by Professor Robert M. Stern in the Department of Economics in 1963. It has been distributing discussion papers since 1968, and it became affiliated with the School of Public Policy in 1980. The activities of the Research Seminar include a weekly seminar or workshop, an ongoing program of faculty and graduate student research, linkages with developing country institutions, conferences involving academics and policy makers, training of graduate students specializing in international economics and international economic law, and the distribution of a series of RSIE Discussion Papers.

Co-directors of the Research Seminar are Alan V. Deardorff, James A. Levinsohn, and Robert M. Stern, Professor, Associate Professor and Professor, respectively, of Economics and Public Policy. Other core faculty include: Drusilla K. Brown (Tufts University); John H. Jackson (Law), Lutz Kilian (Economics), and Gary Saxonhouse (Economics). Several additional faculty members from Economics, Business Administration, and Public Policy also participate actively in the Research Seminar. The Research Seminar is administered by the School of Public Policy and is located on the fourth floor of Lorch Hall, the building that also houses the Department of Economics.

Faculty research currently in progress under the auspices of the Research Seminar includes such topics as: the future of the multilateral trading system; preferential trading arrangements; econometric analysis of trade and trade policies; international taxation, international finance, and international corporate behavior; economic reform and transition; international economic law and policy; and international political economy.

Research results are reported initially in the form of Discussion Papers. For almost thirty years, these have been circulated periodically to about 200 specialists in international economics and to government and international agencies and institutions. More recent discussion papers are available for viewing and downloading here on the World Wide Web.

In 1989, a series of Studies in International Economic Policy was established under the auspices of the University of Michigan Press. Professor Stern is the General Editor of the series.
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ECON 851. Advanced Economic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lones A Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is not really a course at all, but a research seminar. Here you enjoy the best economic theory research that Ann Arbor money can buy from around the world. Students enrolled are encouraged not to be silent during the seminars, but to ask piercing questions that display deep understanding, as well as help the seminar speaker.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ECON 859(759). Seminars in Comparative Economic Development.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew M Coleman (coldman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Comparative Economic Development are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ECON 864. Seminar in Economic History.

Economic History

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar in Economic History is devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate student, a University of Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ECON 875. Research Seminar in Quantitative Economics.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: ECON 673, 674; and Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

RSQE is an economic modeling and forecasting unit which has been in operation at the University of Michigan since 1952. RSQE provides forecasts of the economic outlook for the U.S. and Michigan economies based on quarterly econometric models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ECON 881(781). Seminars in Public Finance.

Public Finance

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julianne Berry Cullen (jbcullen@umich.edu) , Joel B Slemrod (jselmrod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Seminars in Public Finance are devoted to critical discussion of new research in the field. Each week an original research study is presented by a graduate students, a Michigan faculty member, or a faculty member visiting from another university.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

ECON 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

ECON 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ECON.


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