College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 6:32 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


ENGLISH 406 / LING 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory — as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 — Old English.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The class will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The course will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literature in producing these meanings? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically? Requirements: response papers, final exam and research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of department required.

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 003 — War and 20th-Century U.S. Art. Meets with American Culture 301.002.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/407/003.nsf

American culture was profoundly shaped during the 1900s by a series of new wars creating new conditions both for soldiers on the fronts and civilians at home. Starting from that rather obvious premise, this course explores the "how" and "why." The shocking scale and mechanization of World War I, costly non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting necessity of World War II, the forgotten Korean War, the domestically divisive Vietnam conflict, the restorative Desert Storm — each conflict abroad necessitated a renegotiated sense of self at home. Many of the art works we will study define themselves in opposition to the respective official government line, but through the use of primary sources we will examine both sides of the domestic battle for the cultural and rhetorical upper-hand, as people fight to determine how a conflict will be understood and how it will be remembered. Soldiers' letters, for example, can illuminate the role art played in the lives of soldiers, helping them negotiate the danger of their immediate environment and inform their sense of the larger historical and political forces at work.

This course requires two shorter papers and a 10pp research project using University research collections. Readings could include works by Faulkner, Hemingway, H.D., Dos Passos, Heller, Vonnegut, O'Brien, Komunyakaa, and Bowden, in addition to films and journalism.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 004 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of department required.

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 005 — Texts of U.S. Slavery, Race and Labor: "From 'Nadir' to 'New Negro'". Meets with CAAS 495.001.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 495.001.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 — Prison Reality.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 — Technology & the Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf03/415f03syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/416/001.nsf

This course will examine writing by and about women in later Victorian and Edwardian Britain. The primary tasks of the course will be to consider the different ways of reading demanded by different kinds of texts, and to explore how women are figured through these texts. Our readings will range from documentary works such as postal directories, maps, and cookbooks, to imaginative works such as novels, poetry, and illustrations; these primary sources will often be read alongside scholarly essays on relevant historical topics. While the course will provide an introduction to the domestic ideologies that pervaded the writing of and about Victorian women, we will more particularly focus on women's negotiation of urban spaces (such as slums, shopping areas, and public squares) and on social reform issues concerning British women (on marriage, public health, and voting rights). The major texts of the course will include -Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management (1861), J.S. Mill's -The Subjection of Women (1869), Gissing's -In the Year of the Jubilee (1894), and Virginia Woolf's -Night and Day (1920).

Two essays (five and ten pages), two short papers (one to two pages), and two exams will be set for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Department

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 — The Poetry of Compression or How Loss of Dimension Expands (also known as: The Growing of Language Crystals).

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In writing poems this semester, there will be an emphasis on gestures to compensate for what so far is necessarily lost in the translation of experience into poetry, beginning with a consideration of the loss of the three-dimensionality of experience as it is made to conform to the two-dimensionality of the page. For poetic structures, we will therefore attempt to utilize the "nets" of polyhedra, which is what a solid object, such as a cube, becomes when the object is presented flat or "undone." The flat-packing of the polyhedra will create more locations for poems to progress in space and time; we will write about those locations in our poems seldom considered in order to attempt to create more accurate 2D of 3D experience. We will be concerned with what lies on the planes opposite, under, beside, above, below, etc., the emotional, physical, logistical, tonal, momentary, etc. locations of the subjects and ideas in our poems. And we will also consider how what we place on these planes can vary as scale and time are varied. We will, in part, create more options for stanzaic presentation and will have the option to repack the polyhedra so that the poems will be unable to fit into conventional displays (2D books) of poetry but will be instead more like language sculptures (if occupying 3D space), or could take advantage of those computer presentations that allow what appears on the screen to have depth, sort of like CAD, but only with words. We will, in effect, be growing language crystals. The semester will culminate with a show of our poetic sculptures in either their packed or unpacked forms. Please join me in this experiment. Texts will probably be selected from the following list: Platonic and Archimedean Solids by David Sutton (as our primary source of unpacked maps of polyhedra), Garbage by A. R. Ammons, Cascadia by Brenda Hillman, Slave Moth by Thylias Moss, Autobiography of Red by Anne Carson, and Fractals: The Patterns of Chaos by John Briggs. Permission of Instructor required for enrollment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1,5: Permission of Instructor/Department

ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 — Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The narrative form we call the English novel developed over the course of the eighteenth century in a series of brilliant formal, imaginative, and intellectual experiments. We will read some of the most remarkable of these experimental narratives, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688), Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1747-49 ), Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749), Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-67), Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813). In reading these works we'll be concerned with a variety of matters aesthetic and cultural, including the elaboration of action into plot; the development of authorial voice and authority; the shaping of reader response; the representation of individual consciousness amid other interacting and competing subjectivities; the use and implications of setting. We'll also be interested in these novels' representation and critique of cultural values and social practices, including their depiction of gender and class relations and, to the limited extent it concerns them, the representation of racial difference; the operations of the law, including its treatment of crime; the distribution and exchange of property; along as well with their treatment of themes large and small like love and marriage, death, good and bad manners, what it means to have justice done or to lead a "good life." Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be a midterm exam and a final exam, as well as an end-of-term paper or other equivalent project. Approximate cost of books: $80-90.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will trace the development of the novel form, written in English, in the Americas. Novels may include: Oroonoko, Wieland, Moby Dick, My Antonia, Sound and the Fury, Eyes Were Watching God . Issues and topics we will find ourselves tracing throughout the term are: travel or movement through space, the significance of place/region and environment, the status (gender/race/nationality/class) of the author, the narrator's persona, shifts in the narrator's perspective, the representation of racial and cultural conflict, spirituality, changes in the form of the novel, masculinity/femininity, and historical changes from the late 17thc Atlantic world to the post-modern US of the late 20th century. You will bring in brilliant reading questions to every class, write three stunning papers (one 3-4, two 5-6pp); I reserve the option to give an in-class midterm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine salient examples of the contemporary novel in America--by contemporary I mean those authors who are still alive and by novel I mean fictions of a certain length. The "Great American Novel" does not, I think, exist; we're too various and multiform a society for any single text to encompass or describe us all; think of the various subsets and hyphenated categories in a bookstore's shelf-space and you'll see, I think, what I mean. (Indeed, most people's candidate for the GAN would be a book written more than a hundred years ago, whose title character is a whale and whose principal action takes place offshore...) We'll discuss novels mainly from a writer's perspective--focusing on matters of structure, pace, presentation, and language, as well as subject matter and theme. This course may therefore be of particular interest to undergraduate fiction writers, and some of the written work will be "creative". Our dozen texts will be announced as the time draws near.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001 — Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets — Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, and Wallace Stevens — but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 — American Selves.

Instructor(s): MARIA SANCHEZ (maricarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do we know what an individual is, or who counts as one? This course will study the development of individualism in the United States through readings of a wide variety of 19th century texts (with a possible quick nod to the 20th century toward the end of the term). We'll begin by looking at different strains of individualism, roughly divided into those that privilege thought (interiority, self-identity, self-knowledge), and those that privilege deed (social status, occupation or profession, action); all the while, we'll consider the role of writing, and the vital importance of the written word, to how Americans come to understand individualism. How do slaves, for example, achieve individuality, when they are defined as 3/5 of a one person for purposes of congressional apportionment? How do the century's changing ideas concerning gender roles, "Americanness," immigration and imperialism, theoretical class fluidity, and so on, affect how we define an individual? Our authors may include: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Zitkala-Sa, Henry David Thoreau, Harriet Wilson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, and Elizabeth Stoddard.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

ENGLISH 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 — e.e. cummings.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of e.e.cummings, one of the great artists and personalities of the 20th century. Cummings is primarily known for his poetry, but he was also a significant painter, playwright, novelist, critic, and aesthetician. During the course, we will study cummings' complete poetic corpus (of almost 1000 poems), one of his novels, The Enormous Room, one of his plays, Him, and some of his criticism, as he delivers it orally in his famous Charles Eliot Norton(non-) lectures. For his life, we will read Richard Kennedy's biography of cummings, Dreams in the Mirror. For his visual art and aesthetics, we will read Milton Cohen's Poet and Painter, which explores cummings' sketches, painting, and artistic ideas. Requirements for the course will be two medium length papers (5-10 pages) during the term and one longer paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: permission of department

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 — Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with CAAS 458.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In an interview from the early 1980s, Toni Morrison states that "narrative remains the best way to learn anything. . .so I continue with narrative form." The aim of this course is to explore, in detail, Morrison's uses of narrative form and figurative language. We will read virtually all of Morrison's novels, examining the development of themes and formal strategies. We will also read Morrison's literary and cultural criticism, paying particular attention to the ways in which issues in the novels are addressed in these non-fiction works. Among the questions we will attempt to answer by reading the novels and criticism together is the question of how narrative might function as a form of theory. Other ongoing concerns of the class will be to situate Morrison's work in the African American and American literary traditions and to investigate the connections between her aesthetics and those evident in African American music.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

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ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001 — [Honors].

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This colloquium is limited to students already enrolled in the English Honors Program who intend to complete Honors theses in Winter 2004. Through a series of intensive discussions and exercises, we'll explore strategies and methods for working through every aspect of the thesis project: refining research areas, working with advisors, choosing and using secondary materials, and drafting and re-drafting for the most effective argument and prose. Our format will be that of a workshop, in which we circulate work continuously over the course of the term; each student should end the term with a workable draft of the thesis project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department. English Honors only.

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

ENGLISH 501 / GERMAN 501. Old English.

Section 001 — OLD ENGLISH. Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings — the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. You will also develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from. Course requirements: daily recitation, weekly quizzes, two hour exams, a term project (written and oral presentation). Written work also includes regular short modernizations and longer take-home modernizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 516. Literary Research and the Computer.

Section 001 — Meets with English 415.001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf03/415f03syl.html

The broad objective of this course, designed for graduate students and upper-level undergraduate students in departments across the University, is to work with — and study the theoretical implications of — the tools and techniques used to create, gather, manipulate, analyze, and present electronic information both locally and via computer networks. We will pay special attention to the techniques available to facilitate scholarship, especially collaborative scholarship, in the humanities, and to the creation and publication of "compound documents" be they on diskette, on CD-ROM, or on network servers. In addition to each student's pursuing work to generate an individual product, by the middle of the semester all students in the class will be working in groups of four or more to tackle a real project in the humanities and produce a fairly sophisticated and substantial multimedia product. Such projects might include, for example, a) the generation of an on-line resource, including historical material, video clips, class handouts, science lessons, and literary criticism in the support of the University's existing lecture/discussion course in science fiction; b) the publication of a poetry anthology, using typographical techniques and page design to get a desired effect in digitally published paper versions, and augmented for an on-line version with graphic and textual critical and background materials made available through hypertextual links; c) the assembly of a documentary resource annotating a series of films, complete with film clips to illustrate points; d) the creation of a literary research paper using digital texts alongside images of the originally published paper texts; and e) the design and construction of information products, for example, a 17th-century English culture database that can be searched on-line and/or explored on CD-ROM or via a hypertext navigator such as Netscape, or, using similar techniques, a database exploring the uses of verbal and visual idioms across cultures. We can take advantage of the University's capability of publishing these course projects as Web pages or CD-ROMs. The range of possible projects will be restrained only by the time available, the imagination of the students, and the concurrence of the instructors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

ENGLISH 520. Introduction to Graduate Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English or Women's Studies and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. A required course for first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies graduate students only.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce first-year PhD students to the forms of research, writing, and interpretation typical of graduate-level literary study and to the academic profession more generally. Through a combination of workshops, exercises, selected readings, and class discussions, we will assemble a toolkit of research methodologies, writing and speaking skills, and critical perspectives that should be broadly applicable in both subsequent courses and the dissertation-writing process. We will spend some time exploring the specific conventions and protocols of academic life, but we will also strive for a larger view, in which we consider the challenges and opportunities the profession can provide and its problematic status in contemporary society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/Department

ENGLISH 527. Contemporary Critical Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This will be a survey of some of the key movements and texts in contemporary literary theory, with some attention to their nineteenth-century roots. Coverage will include: post-structuralism, materialism, feminism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, post-colonial theory, and queer theory. Major texts are likely to include works by Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Raymond Williams, Kaja Silverman, Catherine Gallagher, Stephen Greenblatt, Eve Sedgwick, and Judith Butler. There will also be a substantial course pack with supplementary essays, and a theoretical anthology (probably Lentricchia and McLaughlin's Critical Terms for Literary Study).

Though the course will be organized as a survey, we will also use a few key literary texts as reference points for the theoretical work we explore, and there will also be time devoted to the development of contemporary critical practices that integrate various theoretical impulses. We will use as models for this a number of essays by contemporary literary critics. To combat the danger of perfunctory, relentless critique — always a risk in surveys of theory — we will focus on some of the more extravagant and suggestive texts by the major figures listed above, and we will attend more to their critical potentials than to their inevitable shortcomings.

One final paper, and a few informal writing exercises.

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ENGLISH 538. Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the century to the mid-1940s. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will discuss issues that repeatedly manifest themselves in these novels: how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that characterize the modern period? How do the wars of the first half of the previous century shape and deform the novels written at that time? How does this body of fiction address (and fail to address) the volatile issues associated with race and class in the first half of the twentieth century? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? We will read James Joyce's Ulysses, Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse and Between The Acts, Jean Toomer's Cane, and William Faulkner's The Sound And The Fury. Students will write a substantial final paper for this course, as well as a shorter essay due earlier in the term.

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ENGLISH 540. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 — Literature for Children and Young Adults. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Liz Mackman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The class will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The class will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literature in producing these meanings? ? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically? Requirements: response papers, final exam, research paper.

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ENGLISH 552. Nineteenth Century American Literature.

Section 001 — American Sentiments.

Instructor(s): Maria Sanchez (maricarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Powerful, touching, inspiring, true; sappy, schlock, hackneyed, tear-jerkers, flowery, popular; empowering, social, mass-oriented, sensationally designed; imperialist, colonialist, racist, classist, heterosexist; white; black; Mexican, Sioux. Masculine? Feminine? (Feminist?) Contradictory? This course will look at major works of U.S. sentimental literature from the 19th century as well as the influential criticism concerning those works. Our goals will be to understand a partial history (at least) of sentimental writing and its receptions in the U.S., tracing the course of interpretations to which the preceding list of adjectives gestures; to see if we can understand what makes literature sentimental, and indeed, even "what is sentimentality?"; to investigate the relations of this literature and criticism to changing conceptions of sex, gender, race, class, national identity, authorship, and that thing we call literature. Hence the reading will mix fiction, poetry, and some autobiographical writing with equal amounts of criticism and literary history. Exact authors — and adjectives — to be determined

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ENGLISH 563. Shakespeare: The Earlier Plays.

Section 001 — Elizabethan Revenge.

Instructor(s): Steven G Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/563/001.nsf

Sixteenth-century English society is not usually thought of as a "revenge culture." That is to say, daily life was not significantly structured around an ethic of vengeance or an ideology of lex talionis or the cycles of reciprocal violence that such structures produce in other societies of the period. Revenge as such, in these sociological terms, is hard to find in early modern Englandľor at least it is when one looks offstage, outside the early modern theater. On stage, it sometimes seems to be everywhere one looks. This course will examine a series of revenge plays (comedies and tragedies) by Shakespeare and his contemporaries, in an effort to understand and explore this disjunction between social and virtual (theatrical) realities. Genres of literature that are especially popular can tell us many things about past cultures, but what they have to say to us is not immediately comprehensible; we need to listen carefully as audience, as interpreters, as translators, as theorists, even as unlicensed anthropologists, to the varied and various cultural texts that serve as our local informants to the past. We will begin with non-Shakespearean dramatists like Kyd and Marlowe, and explore the ways in which early Shakespearean plays (the first history tetralogy, Titus Andronicus, Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet, and eventually Hamlet) respond to, learn from, imitate, and diverge from these contemporaries. This will primarily be a reading course, and close attention to the dramatic text, possibilities of staging, and issues of performance will be combined with more theoretical concerns that arise from our own inquiries.

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ENGLISH 569. Writing Workshop in Creative Non-Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a seminar for graduate students who want to write nonfiction that is creative, moving, intellectually exciting, provocative, beautiful, and deeply engaging. (We might not succeed, but we can try.) We will be reading a great deal of published nonfiction, trying to see how masters of the essay, article and nonfiction book use the forms, styles and structures of fiction and poetry (and other genres) to handle "true" material. Our subjects will come partly from remembering our own experiences, but also from reading books, talking to other people, exploring new places and conducting various types of experiments and inquiries. Students will be allowed leeway in shaping the seminar to explore subjects that interest them; some will want to approach the course as critics and scholars, others as essayists, others as literary journalists, still others a writers of poetic meditations. Everyone will be held to the same high standards of literary form and style and rational, humanistic thought. Each participant will write three original pieces of nonfiction, some of which will be critiqued in class.

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ENGLISH 570. Research in Composition.

Section 001 — Introduction to Composition Studies. Meets with Education 621.001.

Instructor(s): Anne Ruggles Gere (argere@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to Composition Studies, a capacious and interdisciplinary field that has its roots in pedagogy. Accordingly, we will focus on the teaching of writing, beginning with our own experiences as writers, the writing of our students, and the relationship between what we do as readers and writers. This course will consider questions such as: "What can our own literacy narratives tell us about processes of writing and learning to write?" "How do race, gender and class figure in these processes?" "What is good writing?" "What considerations of value shape our thinking about the quality of writing?" "How can the history of composition studies, both inside and outside the academy, inform our teaching?" "How does composition studies situate itself in the academy?" "What do critical theorists have to say to composition teachers and vice versa?" We will look to our own experiences as students and as teachers; to theorists from the Classical period forward; and to contemporary writers as we explore these and related questions. Because students typically bring a wide variety of experiences and interests to the course, there will be considerable opportunity for self-directed reading along with common course materials. Course requirements will include one long final project, several shorter ones, and a class presentation.

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ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6). May not be repeated for credit. This course is only open to current MFA students.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A workshop course in the nature and technique of prose fiction — both short and long. There will be readings assigned and close analysis of submitted work; classroom attendance and participation is mandatory. Each student is expected to produce a minimum of 10,000 words.

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ENGLISH 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6). May not be repeated for credit. This course is only open to current MFA students.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The graduate fiction workshop is a studio course, designed to help MFA writers further develop their art and refine their aesthetics. As workshop writers present fiction-in-progress, we'll discuss issues of form — the slippery and changing shapes of fiction, what is formally possible in a given work and the linked questions of architecture, narration and point of view, character, voice, language, image, music, etc. What role does lyricism play? How do we represent various experiences of time? In what ways do we envision and construct character, relationship, place? Which conventions are most interesting to explore the limits of, to reinvent, to ignore? How might we think about the relationships between fiction writing and other arts? Between our experiences of culture/cultural moments, the ways in which we tell stories, and the stories we tell? Throughout the term, graduate writers will produce and present new fiction, complete brief assigned projects, and read and respond to both fiction by workshop members and contemporary published work.

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ENGLISH 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It will be our business to become an adaptable and rigorous critical readership for one another's work-in-progress. We will use the workshop as an occasion to broaden formal and thematic range, to refine editorial skills, to share questions, enthusiasms, and generous skepticisms. Our primary focus will be on new work submitted by the members of the class, but we will also read selected work by other poets, generally contemporaries in mid-career.

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ENGLISH 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lorna G Goodison

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

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ENGLISH 583. Theory of Film.

Section 001 — Feminist Film Theory and Hitchcock. Meets with FILMVID 600.001.

Instructor(s): Gaylyn Studlar (gstudlar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 600.001.

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ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

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ENGLISH 646. Topics in the Romantic Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with texts central to Enlightenment thought and to the two principal critiques of that thought, one contemporary with Enlightenment (i.e., Romanticism) and one from the 20th century (i.e., materialist and poststructuralist critique). To establish some tenets and traditions of Enlightenment, we will read texts from the work of Bacon, Locke, Descartes, Paine, Kant, and others; Romantic texts will be drawn from the work of Hegel, Burke, Fichte, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Blake, Byron, and Shelley. The third grouping — materialist and poststructuralist theory — will include Marx, Freud, Horkheimer/Adorno, Foucault, Deleuze, and others. By end of term, students should be able to identify positions and implied commitments in the readings and arguments they encounter in the critical and cultural studies of their own time. The formal dimensions of critical thought (e.g., poetry vs. philosophy, manifesto vs. treatise) will also be considered. Class presentations are required.

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ENGLISH 648. Topics in the Modern Period.

Section 001 — Reading American Modernism.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is dedicated to examining with care (if not skepticism) the rubric that organizes it, which may well appear powerful, oxymoronic, confusing, and provocative by turns. Working genealogically rather than in the mode of survey, our focus will be U.S. literary production from 1880-1940 that responds variously to the constellation of social changes we name modernity: realism and naturalism; ethnic and immigrant writing; high and popular modernisms, radical and New Deal culture. With respect to longstanding rubrics for naming modernity — the Gilded Age; nativism and progressivism; New Womanhood; the Jazz Age and New Negro Renaissance; the New Deal — we'll consider the conduct of literary texts in naming and negotiating key sites of social crisis and change. In particular, we'll consider literary responses to the reign of the image being defined by photography and mass visual culture. Along the way, we'll compare the alternative perspectives of American studies and modernist studies on this era, and the distinctive methodologies and vocabularies they've generated for addressing it. Key figures will likely include William Dean Howells, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Anzia Yezierska, Sui Sin Far, James Weldon Johnson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, James M. Cain, Esther Bubbly, James Agee and Walker Evans, and the storied photographers of the FSA. Course requirements will include class discussion leading on assigned and chosen materials, two short essays and a final essay, and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 649. Topics in Contemporary Literature.

Section 001 — Race and Narrative. Meets with American Culture 699.001.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 699.001.

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ENGLISH 695. Pedagogy: Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Leslie Curzan (acurzan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies gradaute students. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide guidance, support, and advice as you begin your teaching career at the University of Michigan — a challenging and exciting experience that can also be nerve-wracking for all but the most experienced instructors. The course aims to address both the practical questions that come with teaching and some of the broader theoretical issues involved in course design; our discussions should also help you develop a set of strategies for reflecting on your own development and practices as a teacher, now and in terms to come. Throughout the term, the course will focus on many of the practical concerns of being a graduate student instructor: facilitating discussion, grading, negotiating your relationship with students and with professors, controlling your time, etc. These discussions will be complemented by selected readings from some of the thoughtful published material on teaching, often specifically within an English department. The second half of the course will turn more to issues of course goals and syllabus design (including specific writing assignments) to help you prepare for teaching 124 the following year. In addition, I will make regular visits to your classrooms so that I can give you specific feedback on your own strengths and weaknesses as well as the kinds of student interactions I can observe within the context of your class. One key to good teaching is collaboration, and in this course we will work together to talk through pedagogical questions and concerns, including how to apply pedagogical theory. Our weekly meetings as a community of professional teachers will be a forum where you can share teaching worries and successes, learn from each other's experiences, and develop pedagogical strategies and skills that will guide you throughout your teaching career.

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ENGLISH 822. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 — Foucault.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of the major works of Michel Foucault, paying particular attention to his political and ethical writings and interviews (which cluster around the themes of madness, sexuality, and the history of subjectivity). We will examine as well some of the major critiques of Foucault, and we will look at various attempts by others to extend his thinking since his death two decades ago. What is a Foucauldian approach? What forms has Foucauldianism taken since Foucault's death? What are the possibilities for Foucauldianism today? Is Foucault's legacy exhausted, or has it yet to be realized? The seminar will be taken up with reading and discussion; the writing requirement will be a final seminar paper, on some topic pertaining to the student's own project, that addresses an aspect of Foucault's thought.

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ENGLISH 831. Seminar: The Study of Genre.

Section 001 — Genres in American Fiction.

Instructor(s): June M Howard (jmhoward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Virtually all commentaries on literary works rely in some way or another on concepts of genre. Literary history too indispensably subtends critical practices that do not directly engage or theorize it. In Americanist criticism, terms like romance, sentimentality, realism, naturalism, local color, regionalism, modernism, are used constantly, with varied degrees of consistency and self-consciousness. And even so simple a gesture as mentioning an "American novel" implies the relevance of national tradition and a claim about form. In this course we will strive to think systematically about the nature of literary classification, and to reflect critically on the received categories of our field.

We will read some works of fiction, often ones that have served as sites of debate; some critical essays and book excerpts; and some theoretical works. One of the goals of the course is, certainly, for each of us to achieve a detailed understanding of these separate texts. We will also be working towards a grasp of the theoretical problems of genre criticism, a critical awareness of how various forms and traditions have been constituted as objects of study, and a sense of the ways we might usefully organize our understanding of print culture in the United States. The focus of the course will be on the particular cases of sentimentality, realism, and (especially) regionalism in the latter 19th and early 20th centuries. However, our conversations and the topics of students' papers may also range more widely.

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ENGLISH 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 — Mapping Embodiment in Early Modern England. Meets with WOMENSTD 801.002.

Instructor(s): Valerie J Traub (traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate the variety of representations of eroticism and the body in English stageplays, poems, travel narratives, medical texts, and map atlases of the early modern period. In the last decades of the sixteenth century, circulating in manuscript were the first native English pornographic poem, an anonymous lyric advocating female-female marriage, and sonnets celebrating the beauty of a male beloved by the man who would come to be considered the greatest English poet. Turn-of-the-century revenge tragedies sensationalize brother-sister incest, while crossdressing comedies exploit the range of desires enabled by confusions of gender. By the Restoration, poems had been published expressing voyeuristic delight in watching one's lover undress, describing the aesthetic allure of women's nipples, and making fun of male impotence.

What accounts for this extraordinary range of literary interest in various forms of eroticism? In order to begin to answer this question, this course will put literary representations of erotic desire into dialogue with "new" material technologies for producing knowledge about human embodiment: anatomical texts and illustrations, cartography, and travel literature — all of which, in their own way, "map" desires and practices onto the world's bodies. The guiding question of this seminar is twofold: How do these new technologies influence the representation of bodies and desires? How do literary tropes and conventions contribute to the production of knowledge about bodies?

More specific questions are: Did anatomical dissection offer to literature primarily a trope or a procedure? How did mercantilism, exploration, and colonial aspirations affect erotic representations, and how did ideas about erotic life impact the emerging global economy of exchange, conquest, and domination? How closely do pornographic images and themes correspond to representations of travel and anatomy? How useful are modern psychoanalytical tools (repression, narcissism, fetishism, voyeurism, projection, and displacement) to our understanding of early modern representations?

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ENGLISH 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 002 — Legal and Literary Realisms: The Victorians.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar asks how a crisis of realism links discourses of law in British Victorian legal theory and practice, in popular politics and in literary culture. This guiding question builds on a recent, largely Americanist line of argumentation about the relations of legal and literary "realism," and the seminar itself might be understood as translating that argumentation to the British Victorian context. The big theory issue here is whether and how a long-standing orthodoxy of "natural-law" theory finally ceded much of its practical authority in the mid-Victorian years to a modern liberal vantage point epitomized in "legal positivism." Because such theoretical transitions are never simple or definitive events, however, we will look to a variety of cultural contexts to see whether Victorian engagements with the idea of law indeed body forth an unresolved referential crisis. And if so, can we trace that crisis to the uneasy relations of liberal culture and various metaphysical realisms, including moral realism and legal realism? We take three historical contexts as focusing points: (1) novelistic representations of law, via characters and themes such as alibis, the entail of estate, wills, contracts, etc.; (2) hostilities in the radical periodical press concerning perceived injustices in the administration of law; and (3) English law in Victorian imperial culture, as in the English codification of Indian law during Gladstone's first administration. We engage primary literary texts by canonical authors — such as Dickens, Trollope and Eliot — and primary cultural documents of other sorts. We also survey recent secondary criticism, which has moved in many ways beyond a poststructuralist vision of textuality that has defined the "law as literature" movement since the 1970s.

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ENGLISH 851. Seminar: American Literature.

Section 001 — History, Memory and Subjectivity in Contemporary African-American and Caribbean Literature. Meets w/ American Culture 801.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The themes, then, that I wish to pursue here are centered on the relation between the writing of history as prediction and as retrospection. The history that will be is, after all, as much how we recount what happened as how we project a future; the history that will be is, inevitably, a history of the present, that divided site that must look both ways at once. — Jonathan Goldberg, "The History that Will Be" History, especially the history of slavery, haunts contemporary African American and Caribbean literature. As we enter the new millennium, as the history of slavery recedes even further into the past, it seems to loom larger in the Black literary imagination. This course will examine novels and plays published from the 1960s through the 1990s and the ways in which they address memory (especially the memory of trauma), oral and written history, and the formation of black subjectivity. If, as novelist Charles Johnson argues "each plot. . . is also an argument," then a major function of this course is to analyze the arguments — about memory, history, and identity — embedded in contemporary fiction and drama from the African diaspora, as well as the idea of literature as a form of theory.

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ENGLISH 861. Seminar: Authors.

Section 001 — Yeats, Joyce and Ireland.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, Women's Studies, or English and Education Program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the work of two major modern Irish writers, Yeats and Joyce. We will focus on Yeats' poetry and on Joyce's fiction (Dubliner, Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses) in terms of the construction both of international modernism and of Irish cultural and political nationalism. Both aesthetic and cultural strategies will come up for discussion, and students should feel comfortable with poetry as well as with prose. Through the literature itself and its contested receptions we will also examine issues in cultural hybridity and will use the extraordinary controversies over recent editions of Joyce's Ulysses and of Yeats' poetry to explore issues in material textuality and how the often problematic editorial construction of texts shapes interpretation and theory.

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ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

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ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu), G Keith Taylor

Prerequisites: Must have a GSI Award. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

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ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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