College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Environment


This page was created at 6:23 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


ENVIRON 411 / NRE 411. Fluvial Ecosystems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael J Wiley (mjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENVIRON 311 or an upper-level course in aquatic ecology or hydrology. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://rivers.snre.umich.edu/WWW411/

Introduces key concepts and theory pertinent to understanding and managing fluvial ecosystems (rivers and streams). Emphasis on rivers as large-scale physical and biological systems; properties and processes. Laboratory includes intensive comparative field study of distinctive types of Michigan rivers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 415 / NRE 415. Behavioral Ecology and Conservation Biology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Eight credits of BIOLOGY, including BIOLOGY 152. ENVIRON 438 recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/415/001.nsf

Environments shape the behavior and life histories of animals, and animals' behaviors and life histories affect how we can act successfully to conserve and manage wildlife species.

How can we use this knowledge? Because environments pose constraints, in any given environment, behaviors have "better" (more effective, less costly) and "worse" impacts on an organism's survival and reproduction. Understanding this complex problem requires that we generate testable hypotheses to understand the functional significance of the behaviors we see. We must consider hypotheses in at least six basic areas: the basics of selection, how the basics play out in different environments, how environments shape life history, life history strategies-mating effort, life history strategies-parental effort, and how life histories affect what conservation strategies will work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 416 / NRE 416. Field Skills in Wildlife Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bobbi S Low (bobbilow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 415. ENVIRON 438 or equivalent statistics is recommended.(2). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/416/001.nsf

In this course, we use field observations and experiments in concert with NRE 415 lectures to examine the problem of how environmental factors influence the ways in which organisms live and behave (natural selection theory). We integrate observation and theory, always in the context of hypothesis testing.

In observing organisms, you will deal with two (2) major problems: (1) How can you decipher exactly what you are seeing, quantify it, and communicate it to others so that they can repeat and expand your observations; and (2) How can you determine the functional significance of each behavior, distinguishing between proximate and ultimate causes, and testing between alternate hypotheses in a rigorous way? In this course, we will be doing animal ethograms to help answer these questions as well as graphing and statistical analyses of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 422 / EEB 440 / NRE 422. Biology of Fishes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kevin Eldon Wehrly

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, biogeography, ecology, and reproduction. The systematic position of fish among vertebrates is discussed and exemplary assemblages examined. Special attention is given to the effect of the physical properties of water on form, function and mode of life of fishes. Discussions examine current papers in the primary literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 423 / EEB 441 / NRE 423. The Biology of Fishes Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Kevin Eldon Wehrly

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 and one additional biology course. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (1).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Optional laboratory course accompanying ENVIRON 422, providing an introduction to the field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examining the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of world fishes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 430 / EEB 489 / NRE 430. Soil Properties and Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Zak (drzak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 and chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 337 and 435 highly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre430/

Soils as central components of terrestrial ecosystems. Major emphasis is placed on physical, chemical, and biological properties and their relationships to plant growth and ecosystem processes. Understanding is developed using a combination of lectures, field- and laboratory-based exercises, and individual research. The function of soils in forested ecosystems is the primary focus; however, examples are drawn from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems.

This course centers on the overlap of soil science, forest ecology, and ecosystem ecology. Our goal is to understand:

  1. how the interactions of landform, topography, climate, and biota over time lead to the patterns of soil development and the distribution of soil types that we observe within the landscape;
  2. how physical, chemical, and biological properties of forest soils affect water and nutrient availability to plants and, ultimately, ecosystem productivity; and
  3. how nutrients are cycled within forest ecosystems and how these processes are influenced by land management practices.

In the field portion of the course, we will sample and describe soils of four forest ecosystems and observe first-hand how differences in landform, topography, climate, and biota influence soil development. In the laboratory we will analyze our soil samples for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties. Using these data in conjunction with field data, each student will select two of the four ecosystems for detailed comparison in a term paper. Although we will focus our attention on local forest ecosystems of Michigan, skills learned in this course may be broadly applied within a variety of terrestrial ecosystem types in other geographic regions.

Prerequisites: Students are expected to have a background in chemistry and biology. In particular, a working knowledge of chemical equilibria, ionic solution chemistry, pH, and oxidation-reduction reactions is highly recommended. Students without such background should consult with the instructor before enrolling. Also useful (although not required) is familiarity with biochemistry, plant physiology, microbiology, geology, and local flora. You will find it very helpful if you have had, or are currently enrolled in, Woody Plants (ENVIRON 337). The lectures and laboratory exercises in Soil Properties and Processes have been designed to complement Forest Ecology (ENVIRON 435), and we highly recommend that you enroll in these courses concurrently!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 432 / NRE 432. Hydrology and Watershed Management.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Richards (pauljr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Principles and processes affecting hydrologic cycles of forested watersheds: precipitation, interception, infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and stream flow. Major emphasis on how hydrologic processes affect watershed management of forest and other terrestrial ecosystems, and how watershed management affects water yield and quality. Floods, soil erosion, and water pollution will be emphasized as special problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 435 / NRE 435. Forest Ecology.

Section 001 — THERE WILL BE FIELD TRIPS TO UM BIO STATION AND TO THE SMOKEY MTS.

Instructor(s): Burton V Barnes (bvb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENVIRON 337. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($100) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Landscape ecosystems and forest species are emphasized in weekly field trips and lectures stressing the ecology of species and the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Landscape ecosystems are studied by integrating physiography, climate, soil, and vegetation. Major emphasis on physiography and site-species relationships, establishment ecology, and competitive and mutualistic relationships. Fire ecology and genetic ecology are also stressed. Special field trips to northern Michigan and the Great Smoky Mountains.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 438 / NRE 438. Natural Resources Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emily D Silverman

Prerequisites: ENVIRON 239; MATH 115. MATH 116 is strongly recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/438/001.nsf

An introductory statistics course, focusing on basic hypothesis testing. Topics covered include goodness-of-fit tests, contingency tables, t-test (1-sample, 2-sample, and paired tests), nonparametric tests, 1-way ANOVA, multiple comparisons, and simple linear regression. Students are expected to attend three lectures and a two-hour computer lab each week. The computer lab uses SPSS software. We will concentrate on applications to the ecological and environmental sciences and emphasize the connection between scientific and statistical hypotheses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 460 / NRE 460. Fishery Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ENVIRON 438. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/460/001.nsf

Fisheries have operated for thousands of years, and supplied employment, food, or recreation for most of the world's population. The current state of the world's fisheries is in crisis, because most fish populations are fully or overexploited. In this course, you will study the history, management, population ecology, oceanography, habitat, economics, and restoration of fisheries. Case studies will include examples of fisheries from the Great Lakes and the world's oceans.

Homework and lab exercises will reinforce theory from lecture. Students will be asked to prepare a literature review of a fishery or fishery problem, and read a novel or history that deals with the subject. In lab, students will work in a group project to study a local fishery or fishery problem. Field trips include sampling local lakes and streams, visits to a fish hatchery, and an overnight trip to the Manistee River during the salmon run.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 471 / NRE 471. Analytical Tools for Environmental Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gloria E Helfand (ghelfand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Statistics (ENVIRON 438 or STATS 402); Economics (NRE 375, 570 or ECON 401). (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/environ/471/001.nsf

An introduction to policy analysis and some of the tools useful for analyzing data, with emphasis on environmental and resource applications. The course will cover methods of policy analysis, modeling, and applications of linear regression and linear programming.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 477 / CAAS 477 / NRE 477. Women and the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta E Taylor

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/477/001.nsf

This course explores issues related to gender, race, class, and environmental inequality. It looks at the historical role of women in the environment in the U.S., explores the development of environmental ideologies, and looks at the relationship between women, environment, and social justice. It examines environmental sub-movements like ecofeminism and environmental justice. The course also examines gender and inequality in the international context. In particular, it focuses on women and development issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 481 / NRE 481 / EDCURINS 474. Foundations of Environmental Education.

Section 001 — [4 credits; 3 for Education students].

Instructor(s): Michaela T Zint (zintmich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in English composition. (4; 3 for School of Education students). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 for School of Education students).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/nre/481/001.nsf

Provides a theoretical understanding of the field of environmental education (EE) with special emphasis on: relevant human behavior models; guidelines for developing, implementing, and evaluating EE materials/programs; and current issues in EE. Presents opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using popular EE materials and writing grant proposals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 481 / NRE 481 / EDCURINS 474. Foundations of Environmental Education.

Section 002 — [4 credits; 3 for Education students].

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: One course in English composition. (4; 3 for School of Education students). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 for School of Education students).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides a theoretical understanding of the field of environmental education (EE) with special emphasis on relevant human behavior models, guidelines for developing, implementing, and evaluating EE materials/programs, and current issues in EE. Presents opportunity to gain hands-on experience in using popular EE materials and writing grant proposals. Education students should register for 3 credit hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 492 / NRE 492 / UP 492. Environmental Justice: Domestic and International.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bunyan I Bryant Jr (bbryant@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~snre492/492.html

This is primarily a lecture course. Information in the course includes:

  1. the definition of environmental racism, environmental equity, environmental justice, and environmental advocacy,
  2. key research issues in the field of environmental justice which includes race vs. income, intent vs. nonintent, pollution prevention vs. pollution control, cause and effect vs. association,
  3. understanding energy and its relation with environmental justice,
  4. the social structure of accumulation vs. the social structure of sustainability,
  5. comparing issues of environmental justice within the U.S. and within developing countries,
  6. comparing the Basel Treaty and the Organization of African Unity's ban on the transport of toxic waste internationally, and the First National Environmental Leadership Summits Seventeen Principles of Environmental Justice.

Both domestic and international examples will be used in the course to enhance teaching and learning. Students will be required to: (1) take a midterm and a final examination, and (2) develop case studies on environmental justice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENVIRON.


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This page was created at 6:23 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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