College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Film and Video Studies


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


FILMVID 400. Filmmaking II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Rayher (rray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 300 or equivalent experience in filmmaking and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($150) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($150) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, editing, and post-production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development being the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to film studies. You will have access to a state-of-the-art Panaflex 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in small groups to produce a substantial sync-sound final project, as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theater and Drama students). Evaluation: participation in in-class projects, production assignments, final project. Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.
Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

FILMVID 401. Video Art II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 301 or equivalent experience with video production and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers various production strategies and concerns: building rhythm and structure, creative use of sound and its relationship to image, realizing non-linear narrative, experimental use of lighting, conceiving and distributing video in ways other than single-channel, and sociopolitical issues around representation. It aims to help students realize their own voices in independent videomaking within the historical context of Video Art. A/B roll editing with digital effects and various computer editing software including the AVID and Premiere will be covered. Evaluation is based on projects, reading and writing assignment, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

FILMVID 406. Computer Animation II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 306 or equivalent experience with video production, and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced class explores the theories and applications of interactive animation design. Individual student projects are developed using Macromedia Director and Adobe Photoshop and Macromedia SoundEdit 16. Graphics, sound, and interactivity are utilized to create highly conceptual non-linear environments. Through critical analysis of both student assignments, and professional works, we will investigate the successes and failures of various types of interactivity to communicate with an audience.
Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor,Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

FILMVID 410. Screenwriting II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites: FILMVID 310. Permission of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/filmvid/414/001.nsf

Students are acquainted with the canonical texts of film theory, dating from the silent period up to the latest developments in multicultural and postmodern theory. The goal is both a familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and the improvement of student's analytic abilities as they approach film from the point of view of philosophy and social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Edward Dimendberg (eddimend@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The development of film theory and criticism from the days of silent motion pictures to the present. The class reads selections from figures such as Eisenstein, Arnheim, Kracauer, and Bazin during the first half of the term, and from contemporary schools such as Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and semiotics during the second half.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 440 / CAAS 440. African Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: CAAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/caas/440/001.nsf

See CAAS 440.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 001 — Italian Cinema and Society Since 1945. Meets with Italian 315.001.

Instructor(s): Giorgio Bertellini (giorgiob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 360. (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore key "moments" in Italian cinema, with the goal of understanding:

  • neorealist film practice as an alternative to CHC "realism";
  • the importance of Italian cinema to realist film theory;
  • the importance of Italian cinema as a model for a cinema of political engagement and social criticism;
  • the cultural and intellectual context out of which Italian cinema was produced (and viewed).

The course will focus primarily on neorealist films and "the art film" of the post-1960 period, but we will also look at popular forms such as the commedia all Italiana, the spaghetti Western, the Supercolossi, and the horror genre. Films will include Bicycle Thieves, Ossessione, La Terra Trema, Voyage to Italy, The Easy Life, L'Eclisse, Teorema, Padre Padrone, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 455. Topics in Film Studies.

Section 001 — American Film Now.

Instructor(s): Brian Price (pricebe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore issues in contemporary American cinema by watching films newly released to theaters. We will examine current releases using various methods and theoretical approaches: formal, industrial, technical, social, historical, political, and/or cultural. Sessions will be devoted to broad questions of perception, authorship, ideology, style, marketing, and stardom which contribute to our overall experience of the films and their box office success or failure.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 455. Topics in Film Studies.

Section 003 — Emergence of Mass Culture.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel (richabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the integral relationship between moving pictures and mass culture at the turn of the last century, as the former increasingly becomes a major component of the latter. Because the emergence of moving pictures and mass culture was especially notable in the USA, our investigation will focus on American culture from the 1880s to the 1910s. It will consider moving pictures in relation to a range of cultural forms and practices, from dime novels, newspaper and magazine stories and ads, as well as adventure pulp fiction to department stores, world's fairs and other "cheap amusements."

During the course of the semester we will be taking up a number of issues and questions that involve mass culture in general and moving pictures specifically. What were the defining constituents of mass culture at the turn of the last century? What were the conditions of its production, circulation and reception, and how did those change over time? How and why did mass culture develop so rapidly and so extensively? How did mass culture transform and/or stabilize the social relations of power/difference which characterized the USA at the turn of the last century? How was it bound up with the process of "Americanization" or the construction of an "American subject," especially in terms of class, race or ethnicity, gender and generation? How does a study of the emergence of mass culture enable us to see and understand the transformations marking mass culture at our own turn-of-the-century?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 455. Topics in Film Studies.

Section 005 — Dialogue of Violence: Cinema in WWII's Pacific Theater.

Instructor(s): Mark H Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/filmvid/455/005.nsf

The course will explore the relationship of World War II's Pacific Theater to moving image media in two movements. First, a comparative history of Hollywood and Japanese filmmaking during the war looks at issues of race, nationality, propaganda, and violence. The second half of the course continues to analyze these problems by turning to post-1945 attempts to remember, critique, and commemorate (or forget) WWII in media as disparate as television, feature filmmaking, video art, and the Internet.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 460. Technology and the Moving Image.

Section 001 — Digital Media & Culture.

Instructor(s): Sheila Murphy (scmurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/filmvid/460/001.nsf

This course explores the various ways in which technology has shaped the art forms of the moving image. The course traces the impact of such innovations as sound, color, and wide screen on the history of the motion picture, virtual reality, and multi-media performances. As well as studying the aesthetics of technology, this course examines the ways in which technology through art influences individual psychology and society at large.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 500. Directed Study in Film and Video.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

FILMVID 600. Seminar in Film Theory.

Section 001 — Hitchcock & Feminist Film Theory. Meets with English 583.001.

Instructor(s): Gaylyn Studlar (gstudlar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FILMVID 414 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate seminar will focus on the pre-talkies and sound films of Alfred Hitchcock, as examined through the lens of feminist film theory. Marked by frequent and self- conscious referencing of psychoanalysis, the complex intertwining of sexuality and violence, and richly realized visual and narrative strategies, Hitchcock's films continue to fascinate contemporary audiences even as they have become some of the most analyzed texts in the film studies canon. It has been argued that these films not only have played an important role in modern film studies, but that they have, in fact, "been central to the formulation of feminist film theory and to the practice of feminist film criticism" (Modleski). Taking this as our foundational tenet, this course will consider how feminist theory has developed out of considerations of Hitchcock films as (1) individual texts, (2) as exemplars of specific generic practices, and (3) as models for the operation of classical Hollywood narrative in general. Among other issues, we will consider how this theory revises other analyses of Hitchcock as well as invites reconceptualization of the construction and reception of classical Hollywood film. Written texts will include writings by Laura Mulvey, Linda Williams, Tania Modleski, Mary Ann Doane, Gaylyn Studlar, Raymond Bellour, Janet Bergstrom, Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan, Jacqueline Rose, Wiliam Rothman, Kaja Silverman, Robin Wood, and Slavoj Zizek.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 604. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. FILMVID 600 and 601, permission of advisor and F&V Graduate Committee. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A minimum of three hours of directed research in film studies is required of all Certificate students. Every student is required to carry out a research project in film studies that represents the culmination of their Certificate studies. This written project will be based on individual reading and screening lists. Students who choose to write a dissertation which incorporates film to a significant degree are encouraged to use this directed research as preparation. In this case, the research project may take the form of a chapter of the dissertation, but the project is expected to vary according to the individual student. The directed research must be approved by the student's Certificate faculty advisor, the advisor in the home unit, and the Film & Video Studies Graduate Committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for FILMVID.


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This page was created at 6:21 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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