College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 6:25 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


FRENCH 438 / ROMLING 456 / EDCURINS 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/438/001.nsf

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods and techniques used in language teaching with emphasis on those that develop the language learner's proficiency in using French for real-world purposes. Readings, lectures, and discussions will be on theoretical issues and current research in language learning and teaching as well as on practical applications to the secondary school language teaching context. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. By examining and understanding theories and research about language learning and teaching, pre-service teachers will be in a position to make informed choices about teaching, selection of teaching materials, and creation of their own teaching activities and to justify these choices to future students, colleagues, administrators, and parents. During the semester, students will have opportunities to practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the School of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to:

  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 465. Literature of the Nineteenth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Poetry and Painting in Nineteenth-Century France.

Instructor(s): Michele A Hannoosh

Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/french/465/001.nsf

French poets of the nineteenth century were preoccupied with painting: its means and materials, the subjects of its representation, its status in the hierarchy and history of the arts. Some of the richest and most innovative poetry of the period was that which sought to explore this relationship with another, different art, attempting to create a poetic language which would incorporate the benefits of the visual image. In this course, we will examine the many ways in which the major poets of the century — Baudelaire, Gautier, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, among others — addressed this crucial question: exploiting the visual potential of language, creating poems inspired by particular paintings or appropriating a specifically visual style, experimenting with spatial structure as in a picture, actively collaborating with artists in illustrations of poetry. Through a combination of focused close reading, on the one hand, and attention to the broader "inter-art" connection, on the other, the course should ultimately lead to a better understanding not only of nineteenth-century French poetry, but of the concept of the poetic or literary "image" itself. The course will fulfill the upper-division writing requirement for undergraduates. Graduate students will write a term paper only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 528 / ROMLING 528 / SPANISH 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/romling/528/001.nsf

See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 601. Proseminar in French.

Section 001 — topic?

Instructor(s): Peggy McCracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 654. Studies in 18th-Century French Literature.

Section 001 — Enlightenment and its Discontents.

Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A graduate-level inquiry into major writings of the French Enlightenment and the fictional literature of its era, understood (a) in their European and philosophical contexts, and (b) in relation to the persistent relevance of their themes in today's theoretical and cultural conflicts and controversies. Readings drawn from recent historical and literary scholarship and cultural commentary, and above all from the works of eighteenth-century century writers (and a few from the seventeenth century): Descartes, Voltaire, Marivaux, Diderot, Rousseau, Mme de Graffigny, Mme Riccoboni, Chamfort, and others. Active class participation expected, including brief presentations as needed; one final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 656. Studies in 20th-Century French Literature.

Section 001 — Le Marais: Memory, Diaspora, and Urban Space.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using the Paris neighborhood known as the Marais as a test case and a starting point, this seminar will discuss intersections between time and space, considering issues such as collective memory, national history, trauma, and the nature of community, diasporic and national. The focus will be on French culture, Jewish memory/history, and queerness, but students will be encouraged to explore different contexts and directions. Readings will be in French and English and (tentatively) include Marcel Proust, Guillaume Dustan, Michael Warner, Samuel Delany, Henri Lefevre, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

FRENCH 993 / ROMLING 993 / SPANISH 993 / ITALIAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 993.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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This page was created at 6:25 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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