College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 6:25 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


GERMAN 415. The German Language Past and Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methods of descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics and sociolinguistics and to apply these to a survey of the German language in both its current and past states. We will be concerned with the internal structure of the language; however, we will relate the internal structure to the cultural and social contexts in which the language has evolved and in which it is currently used.

We will pay particular attention to the differences between spoken and written varieties of German as well as the relationships between standard German and the many German dialects and regional standards. The class is oriented around group discussion, lectures, and presentations.

Requirements include brief homework assignments and short essays, a midterm, a final term paper and an oral presentation of the final paper. Readings will be in German and English. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting, and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

Section 002 — Gender Studies, Film and Contemporary Literature.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: GERMAN 325/326. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. The course will focus on Gender Studies, Film and Contemporary Literature. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Franz Kafka in Context. Meets with College Honors 493.001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Interpretation of one of the hallmark authors of modern Western literature, Franz Kafka, is notoriously difficult. While enduringly compelling, Kafka's literary work — in fact, all his writing, including his letters and diaries — seems elusively allegorical and challenging to decipher. Intriguing, too, is the unique historical situation in which Kafka lived as a German-speaking Jew in Prague in the last years of the multi-national Habsburg Empire and the early years of the Republic of Czechoslovakia. Kafka's personal writing (the diaries and letters, for example) is saturated with references to the questions of identity and ideology that haunted this epoch, but the creative fiction makes no explicit reference to it at all.

For this course, we will be reading some of Kafka's short fiction, fragments, letters, and one novel, along with several full-length studies of Kafka's life and work and the historical contexts of these. The question we will be trying to answer throughout is: what is the relationship — if any — of the extraordinary writing of this author to the complex historical context in which it arose?

The course entails substantial reading and a series of essay assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 — Berlin, Berlin!

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course takes its title from a 1987 exhibit in celebration of Berlin's 750th anniversary. Despite the long history of this city, it has been a quintessentially "modern" metropolis for most of the 20th century. In this course, we will study the transformations of Berlin's urban landscape by looking at the city's cultural representations. How do poetry, short stories, novels, paintings, and films map the city? How have the city's division and reunification affected the production of Berlin's cultural image? The readings from different historical periods will focus on the history of Berlin and on changing representations of key urban sites such as Alexanderplatz, Potsdamer Platz, the Reichstag, or the wall. The remake of the film Sinfonie einer Grossstadt (1927/2002) will further help us to trace the most prominent historical and aesthetic changes from Weimar Germany to the present. Throughout the course, we will work on German grammar and vocabulary, write creative essays, and develop a final web project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (GERMAN 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Completion of the sequence of GERMAN 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall Term of their senior year, preferably — but not necessarily — as early as Winter Term of their sophomore year. GERMAN 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of GERMAN 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall Term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 501 / ENGLISH 501. Old English.

Section 001 — OLD ENGLISH. Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 509. Gothic: Introduction to Germanic Linguistics.

Section 001 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While providing an introduction to the Gothic language, whose linguistic artifacts stem from the 4th century AD, this course also serves as a general introduction to comparative Germanic phonology, morphology and syntax. We examine the emergence of Gothic from its Germanic roots; note the areas in which its development diverges from the developments of other Germanic dialects; survey the cultural institutions that supported early literary efforts; trace the history of the Goths from their appearance in the pages of history, through their migrations from their homeland in Scandinavia to the shores of the Black Sea, to their eventual dispersion and demise as a people; and make a field trip to the Graduate Library to view a copy of the major Gothic literary monument, the Codex Argenteus. Participants will learn to analyze and interpret Gothic texts, both in transliteration into the Roman alphabet and in the original Gothic alphabet. They will learn all about Gothic's synthetic passive voice, the morphology of the middle, nascent periphrasis, inceptivity and inchoativity. There will be written exercises, brief written and/or oral reports, and a final paper. Undergraduates are welcome. No knowledge of German is necessary. Text: William H. Bennett, Introduction to the Gothic Language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 517 / LING 517 / ANTHRCUL 519. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods.

[3 credits].

Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/german/531/001.nsf

GERMAN 531 is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Readings will be primarily in English; class discussion will be in German and English.

This course is intended to provide the theoretical and practical foundations for the teaching of German as a foreign language in schools and colleges. The course will combine regular reading assignments with frequent class observations and the preparation of sample lessons in order to generate a fruitful interplay between theory and practice. There will also be a strong emphasis on introducing students to relevant instructional technology. Course requirements include regular reading assignments, regular class observations, several short presentations, quizzes, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 540. Introduction to German Studies.

Section 001 — Oedipus and the Oedipal.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, the very rich reception of Sophocles' tragedy Oedipus the King will allow us to engage vastly heterogeneous texts in the history of aesthetics as well as literary, cultural, and psychoanalytic theory. Over the last two hundred years, Oedipus the King has emerged as nothing less than "the text of the West," representing, in turn, the logic of subjectivity, of the psyche, of culture, of politics, of capitalism. Readings will include the play itself, in various translations, Hegel's theory of history and aesthetics, Hölderlin's reflections on tragedy and history, Nietzsche's theory of the birth of tragedy, Freud's Oedipus Complex and its Lacanian revisions, Levi-Strauss' theory of myth, Deleuze's and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus as well as a number of literary texts and scholarly texts indebted to Oedipus and the Oedipal. Students from other disciplines are very welcome. Class discussion in English, texts in German and/or English. Requirements: Careful preparation, research paper, one class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 — Seeing (in) Early Modern Europe. Meets with Art History 655.001 and History 698.004.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu) , Celeste A Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In a series of readings and case studies, we will highlight ways that notions of seeing and visual technologies have figured in key (art) historical scholarship on early modern Europe. The course will thus examine the historical implications of taking serious account of the visual, and the art historical implications of historicizing vision and visual culture. In other words, we will be investigating how the disciplines of history and art history and their methods have been brought to bear on one another. Our readings will cover different types of visual objects as well as a range of topics, such as imagery in the context of religious devotion, Reformation propaganda, nascent nation-building, and scientific exploration. We will work toward understanding the changing status of images in an age of mechanical reproduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 002 — Germany's Long Nineteenth Century: Histories and Historiographies. Meets with History 641.001.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 641.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

GERMAN 901. Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For degree candidates who have completed course requirements and who need supplementary work. Under supervision of graduate committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

GERMAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a one week orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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This page was created at 6:25 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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