College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 6:20 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


HISTORY 405 / CLCIV 476 / RELIGION 476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/clciv/476/001.nsf

See Classical Civilization 476.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 408. Byzantine Empire, 284-867.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A lecture course which provides a survey of the history of the later Roman Empire from the reforms of Diocletian that paved the way out of the crisis of the third century, through Constantine's move east and the conversion to Christianity (entering the Byzantine period), Justinian, Heraclius on through the Amorion Dynasty which came to a close with the murder of Michael the Sot in 867. The course will stress political history, giving considerable attention as well to religious history (conversion to Christianity, the great theological disputes over the relationship between God the Father and the Son as well as the relationship between the human and divine natures in Christ culminating in the Church councils of Nicea and Chalcedon, the rise of monasticism and Iconoclasm), administrative reforms (Diocletian's and Constantine's reforms, the reforms of the seventh century culminating in the Theme system), demographic changes and foreign relations (Goths, the Slavic and Bulgar invasions, relations with the Bulgars, relations with the Persians and Arabs in the East and later with the Franks and Charlemagne). No background is assumed. Requirements: a midterm written hour-exam. One ten page paper and a final examination. Paper topics are tailored to individual interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 433. Russia Under the Tsars: From Peter the Great to the Revolutions of 1917.

Section 005 — St. Petersburg & Leningrad: City as History. Graduate students only. Meets with History 433.001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate students taking this course receive 3 credits.

As part of the LS&A theme semester celebrating St. Petersburg, this course will examine the cultural, social, and political revolutions that created St. Petersburg in a desolate Baltic marshland, situated the city as the center of Russia's "Europeanization", and ultimately transformed it symbolically into Leningrad. Our focus will be on the contrasts between cultural glories and social deprivations, between the being "Western" and "Russian", and between reason and belief as influences on historical change. Throughout, the city itself, Peter the Great's "Window on the West", will serve itself as a window on the broader issues of gradual development and revolutionary change in Russia, a symbol of what both tsars and commissars wanted and expected Russia to be.

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HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we explore the history of Japan from the transformation and decline of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th century to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will cover a number of major historical themes that emerge from these centuries of radical change: the deterioration of official forms of control during the latter part of the Tokugawa era (1600-1867) and the rise of new commoner social and cultural spheres; Japan's entry into a world market in the mid-19th century and the establishment of the modern Japanese nation-state; industrial modernization and its social effects; the changing status of women; new forms of social protest and mass culture in the early 20th century; the rise of Japanese imperialism in Asia; the Pacific Asian War and its aftermath; the U.S. Occupation and postwar recovery; "high-growth economics" and its social-environmental costs; culture and political economy in "post-industrial" Japan. The course focuses on the diversity of historical experiences as well as the conflicts that have shaped the history of modern Japan.

Class sessions combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual presentation.

Course pack available at Dollar Bill

Required texts are available at Shaman Drum.

  • Peter Duus, Modern Japan
  • Fukuzawa Yukichi, An Autobiography of Fukuzawa Yukichi
  • Natsume Soseki, And Then
  • Yoshimoto Banana, Kitchen

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — 1770-1942.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) — a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

There will be a midterm examination and a final. In addition, each student will be required to write a research paper of about 15 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. The paper's topic may focus on a single country or region, or it may be comparative; use of primary sources will be especially encouraged. The primary sources may include chronicles or codes of law, travel accounts, newspapers, government documents and reports, short stories, films, novels and/or poetry. There are ample translations available, thus a knowledge of regional languages is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 454. The Formation of Indian Civilization to 320 A.D.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the beginnings of Indian civilization, from about 2500 BC when it first appeared in the Indus valley to the start of the Gupta empire in which it reaches its classic form. It is a lecture survey, which will deal with all aspects of Indian civilization in its formative phase. It presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. (The subsequent history of classical India and the coming of Islam will be dealt with in HISTORY 455, to be offered next term, but each course is self-contained and you need not elect the other.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001 — Peoples of Early America.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended though not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/460/001.nsf

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. HISTORY 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 469. Precolonial Southeast Asia.

Section 001 — Meets with History 667.001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examines the history of Southeast Asia from the early first millennium to the early 19th century. It covers both mainland and island Southeast Asia and explores the interconnection between political, institutional, cultural, and economic developments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — The Colonial Order of Things in SE Asia. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.001.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected up to three times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Lewis

Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lhc/412/001.nsf

This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

Course pack. No text. Must have Junior or Senior standing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Latin America: The Colonial Period. Meets with History 347.001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/347/001.nsf

HISTORY 478 meets concurrently with HISTORY 347, but the writing assignments are designed to meet the needs of graduate students rather than undergraduates. This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of multiethnic societies in the Americas by studying the indigenous background to conquest as well as the nature of the settler communities, and the development of plantation slavery, village life, and colonial cities. Using primary sources, we examine the patterns of belief and the ideas of honor that shaped the lives of men and women. We also explore some of the distinctive cultural features of the region, with particular attention to the art and architecture of the baroque period. Finally, we ask what permitted the survival of these colonial structures for over three hundred years, what factors eventually led to the collapse of the colonial system, and what legacies were left behind as the nations of Latin America achieved formal independence. For a draft syllabus, with a list of readings, see https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/workspaces/rjscott/007.nsf.

Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final.

Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 — Latinos in the U.S. Meets with History 312.001.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof (jessehg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 483(532). St. Petersburg and the Russian Empire in the 18th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in history or Russian studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Developed in conjunction with the St. Petersburg Theme Semester, this course will examine the first century of Imperial Russian history, a period riven with the contradictions of enlightened, Westernizing rulers who ruled over an increasingly oppressed population of serfs and conquered peoples. The history of eighteenth century Russia has been dominated to the exclusion of almost all other subjects by two striking figures: Peter the Great at the beginning, and Catherine the Great at the end. These two powerful rulers attempted to transform Russia from above and left indelible marks of their colorful personalities on the building of their marvelous northern capital and on the development of their country. Recent innovations in historical study have introduced new approaches to this understudied century, so that we now can add to the conventional biographies of the two great leaders with new studies of the society and culture that greeted their innovations, sometimes with enthusiasm and sometimes with suspicion.

In this course, we will combine a variety of approaches, reading monographs, scholarly articles, contemporary memoirs, and literary works of the time to try to understand the complicated dynamics of an era of cultural flowering and enlightenment in a society still characterized by serfdom and a nobility bound in service. We will pay particular attention to the art, architecture, and urban geography of St. Petersburg, the glistening new city built in a northern swamp by order of Peter the Great, transformed into the jewel of the north by the deliberate plan of its succession of monarchs.

We will be able to take advantage of a number of the special events — exhibitions, concerts, performances, and lectures — coming to campus in connection with the 300th anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg in 1703. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to enjoy these special events with a background of knowledge of the period.

The course is open to all, but is designed for upper-division undergraduates and for graduate students. The format will be a combination of lecture and discussion, and lectures will frequently be illustrated with slides. There are no prerequisites.

REQUIREMENTS:

  1. Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
  2. Attendance at some of the special events scheduled outside of class-time (to be arranged).
  3. midterm exam
  4. 7-8 page paper on a primary source
  5. Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 487 / ENGLISH 416 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/416/001.nsf

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Department

HISTORY 541 / AAPTIS 467 / RELIGION 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 467.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 549 / CCS 501. Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China.

Section 001 — Meets with ASIAN 500.001 and SOC 895.001.

Instructor(s): James Lee (jkl@umich.edu) , Albert Park (alpark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chinese Studies 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 — Brazil: Race, Region, and Cultural History. Meets Sept 2 thru October 30. [2 credits]. Meets with LACS 490.001, LACS 590.001 and CAAS 490.001. (Drop/Add deadline=September 22).

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfield (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lacs/490/001.nsf

Brazil is a place of paradoxes and contrasts. The fifth most populous nation, it boasts one of the largest economies and an advanced industrial sector, but suffers income disparity and regional economic imbalances that are among the world's most dire. Its constitution guarantees broad social and economic justice and protects the rights of historically disenfranchised groups, but the implementation and enforcement of the law is hobbled by special interests and police corruption. It is a nation that celebrates its rich multi-ethnic cultural heritage, but remains stratified by perceived racial and regional differences.

In this course, we will examine the historical roots of these paradoxes, focusing particularly on how racial, ethnic, and regional distinctions have been continually reconstructed since the sixteenth-century European invasion; slavery and post-emancipation social relations; the celebration of racial democracy and the reality of racism in the twentieth century; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production, particularly in the areas of dance and music.

The course will conclude by looking at how Brazil's current governing party (the Workers' Party), led by a former laborer from the impoverished northeastern region of Brazil (President Luiz Inacio da Silva, "Lula"), is attempting to change the history of exclusion that has characterized the nation's racial and social history.

Open to upper-level undergraduates and graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 002 — Visualizing Social Life in Edo. Prereq:basic Japanese history. meeting 10 weeks beginning on 10/1,10/8, 10/15, 10/22, 10/29, 11/5, 11/12, 11/19, 12/3, 12/10. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=October 14).

Instructor(s): Reinhard Zoellner

Prerequisites: (1-2). May not be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An imposing array of contemporary illustrations, drawings, and prints depict life in early modern Japan. This course aims at categorizing these materials, analyzing their contents, and using them as another way of imaging Edo society in its complexity.

Students should have basic knowledge of Japanese history, especially Edo period. Japanese language skills are not required.

Grading is based on discussion (50%) and a paper (50%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 — Muslims in South Asia: 20th Century. Meets with History 392.003.

Instructor(s): Barbara Metcalf

Prerequisites: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to review and analyze major themes and historiographical approaches in the scholarship on the Muslim population in the Indian sub-continent in the twentieth century. We will seek to lay bare the arguments of a wide range of writers, identifying their themes, explicit and implicit assumptions, the sources they use, and the rhetorical strategies they deploy to make their arguments.

This course is open to advanced undergraduates who have studied the history of South Asia or equivalent and to graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 596. Directed Area Studies.

Section 001 — Law and Colonialism: The British Empire. Meets with History 302.001.

Instructor(s): Rachel Sturman (rsturman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/596/001.nsf

This course will explore modern theories and institutions of law, private property, the family and the state that emerged in the context of the British Empire. The course will emphasize the simultaneous development of, and relationship between, the legal institutions and practices elaborated for Britain and those developed for various colonial contexts.

Focused case studies of five historical debates will form the core of the course. We will begin by examining the major theories of private property, law, and the state that emerged in the West in the long eighteenth-century. This section will focus on theories of landed property that accompanied the formation of large landed estates in Britain and the expropriation of non-European lands in Australia and North America. We will then turn to British debates about property in persons and to colonial legal regimes regarding slavery, indentured labor, and "free" labor in the Caribbean. From there we will examine the formation of modern criminal law, comparing the modalities that developed in Britain and in India, and the theories of agency, evidence, and punishment that emerged in the two contexts. We also will consider the relationship between criminal and civil law in both contexts. Our fourth topic will address the treatment of religion and custom in Britain, Africa, and India, and the formation of systems of colonial religious and customary law. This will lead us to a more intensive study of the colonial and post-colonial state in India, focusing on legal institutions regarding gender, the family, religious and caste communities, violence, and civil society.

The course will involve close readings of both primary and secondary sources. Students will be required to write and submit a 1-2 page critical analysis of each week's readings, to lead two class discussions, each accompanied by a longer (4-6 page) review with annotated bibliography (these may be coordinated with a fellow student, depending on class size), and to write a final paper of 10-12 pages based on course readings.

Required readings will include:

  • Locke, Two Treatises of Government
  • Hegel, The Philosophy of Right (selections)
  • British Parliamentary Papers on slavery and indentured labor
  • Thomas Holt, The Problem of Freedom
  • Maine, The Ancient Law
  • Radhika Singha, A Despotism of Law

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 600 / SI 580. Introduction to Archival Administration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David A Wallace

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor required.

HISTORY 603 / ANTHRCUL 640. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Section 001 — Research Seminar: Anthropology, History, and the Politics of Comparison.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu) , Nancy Rose Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 640.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

HISTORY 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 002 — Race, Gender, and Empire: The Political Culture of U.S. Imperialism. Meets with Women's Studies 698.004.

Instructor(s): Penny M Von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin by focusing on the debates that emerge out of three provocative collections that have been tremendously influential in reshaping the ways that scholars have approached U.S. empire. We move from a consideration of how slavery, the American Indian question and immigration all figured the nation as an imperial space, through the reshaping of gender and race in the imperial area as the U.S. first emerged as a global power, to the eventual development of a project of global domination through modernization and development that increasingly replaced Western domination through direct colonialism. We will further explore the enormity and originality of these efforts through considering a range of texts on the post-45 era. Taking a broad and eclectic approach to the study of empire, we will ask how these works help us reshape a somewhat older set of questions: what do we gain by viewing U.S. imperialism not primarily through the lens of individual policymakers or administrations, but rather, through asking how it was created or constructed in the broader arena of political culture. How were ideas and events shaped by American culture, how were they explained and promoted at home and around the world, and how did they vary from one historical context to another? How have the interlocking ideologies of imperialism, race, and gender animated U.S. expansion and shaped the political culture and consciousness of American society? Finally, we will test and interrogate the new directions taken in studies of U.S. imperialism by a select but careful methodological comparison with works not focused on the U.S. arena, including works by Benedict Anderson and Arif Dirlik. Syllabi are available in the History department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 001 — Introduction To History: Theories And Practices.

Instructor(s): Kathleen M Canning , Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. HISTORY 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics, and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 002 — Intro Hist:Theories&Practices.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu) , Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The designated studies course covers a broader scope than other studies courses. It is designed to offer first-year graduate students an introduction to historical literature to encourage the development of critical skills. HISTORY 615 is co-taught by two history professors with different areas of expertise. It is not intended to prepare students for a particular regional or chronological specialization, but to provide a forum for collective examinations of methods, topics, and questions of historical writing and research. Both sections of this course are designed to potentially meet the same goals but require different readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 617 / LACS 619 / ANTHRCUL 619. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Section 001 — Mestizaje & National Identity.

Instructor(s): Sanjines, Skurski

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lacs/619/001.nsf

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 619.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 620. Studies in Modern Medicine and Health.

Section 001 — Studies in Modern Medicine.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, disease and the healing professions deeply influenced almost every aspect of social and cultural history. Social and intellectual changes, in turn, helped shape the changing history of disease and medicine. Like race and sex, disease can be seen as a category of difference whose boundaries have been framed and made visible by the intersection of changes in biology, society, and culture.

This course combines an intensive introduction to the theoretical and monographic literature in the field, with a smaller-scale introduction to research methods usually reserved for seminar courses. Students will write two review papers based on the secondary literature, as well as several short assignments based on primary source research. Students who wish to emphasize the research component may elect to take the course for seminar credit.

The examples we will study as a group will be drawn from American history, from initial native-colonial contacts to the crisis of AIDS. But comparisons will be drawn with non-American history and non-American topics will be available for individual papers.
The course is not solely for those who wish to prepare an exam field or write a dissertation in medical history, but for anyone who wants to integrate the material and the cultural dimensions of human health in any historical area. Students who have taken History 620 with Prof. Hunt are welcome to take this version as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 621 / WOMENSTD 621. Studies in Women's History.

Section 001 — Women, Gender, and Representation in American History.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upper classmen with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore written and visual representations of women and gender relations over the course of American history. Beginning with theoretical and methodological readings in fields such as American studies, cultural studies, women's studies, and queer theory, we will devote the most attention to how feminist historians and literary critics have read the languages of gender in historical texts. Texts are defined broadly here to include paintings, engravings, photographs, films, advertisements, medical illustrations, physical objects, and gender performances as well as court narratives, sermons, novels, feminist and anti-feminist tracts, and other printed material. Although primarily an interdisciplinary course in women's history, readings will address overlapping political and scholarly concerns such as colonization and empire-building; race, class, and citizenship formation; constructions of gendered identities and sexualities; and the rise of political, urban, popular, and scientific cultures. Writing assignments will focus on single documents, analyzed through and against course readings and discussions, with the documents determined by the chronological, textual, and topical interests of individual students.

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HISTORY 622 / ECON 663. European Economic History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: ECON 401 and 402. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Economics 663.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTORY 624 / AMCULT 614. Asian American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 614.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 629 / CAAS 629. Studies in African History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

African history is a young field, at least in terms of its professional entry into the North American, European, and African universities. A young field distinctive for its new questions, new approaches, new frameworks of interpretation, African historiography reflects the most unsettled of epistemic grounds as well as the rich possibilities of an evolving scholarship.

This seminar has several objectives.

  • A first is to discover and support the range of interests and goals brought to the seminar by those participating.
  • A second objective is to look at the range of recent works from within Africanist scholarship which help us grasp the rich and productive possibilities of these unsettled epistemic grounds in the study of Africa and its past. We will work towards the construction of approaches to Africa that harness an attention to critique and debate within Africanist scholarship and at the same time an engagement with spaces and programs of history production outside the academy.
  • A third objective of the seminar is to assist members of the seminar in developing new research and the pursuit of various writing projects.

This seminar is open to students from any discipline or department with interests in advanced study of Africa and of its historiography.

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HISTORY 630. Introduction to Greek and Roman Studies.

Section 001 — Greek & Roman History Core Seminar.

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of and introduction to interpretive approaches and methodologies for Greek and Roman history. Readings will include representative samples of both classic scholarship and the latest research in Greek and Roman history, as well as comparative studies from the history of other periods and other disciplines. Requirements include written reviews of the readings, participation in all discussions, an oral presentation of a research project, and an extended paper about that project. Other professors associated with the Program in Greek and Roman History will be participating in some of the discussions, including faculty from classical studies, history, IPCAA, and Near Eastern studies.

All students interested in Greek and Roman history are welcome. This course is required for students in the Program in Greek and Roman History and for students earning the Certificate in Greek and Roman History. Questions or comments? Please contact Professor Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu).

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HISTORY 633. Studies in Roman History I.

Section 001 — Late Antiquity. Meets with History 702.

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 702.001.

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HISTORY 637 / SI 637. Research Seminar on Archives and Institutions of Social Memory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Hedstrom

Prerequisites: HISTORY 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/si/637/001.nsf

The thematic focus of the seminar is memory and the role of archives as memory institutions. We begin the course by exploring different theories of memory and by examining the role of recorded information in memory processes with particular emphasis on collective memory. We then turn to the relationships between history, archives, and memory. We will spend some time on postmodern perspectives on archives and discuss why archives have become a problematic for postmodern philosophers. The seminar will examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection and through the interpretation and display of documentary evidence. We will also discuss issues of archives, memory and trauma and controversies over the selection and display pf history documents and artifacts. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor required.

HISTORY 638. Studies in Medieval History.

Section 001 — The Rhetoric of Reform in Medieval Christianity, 1050-1450.

Instructor(s): Nold

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the eleventh century, successive bishops of Rome set out to reform European society; in the fifteenth century, most of Europe thought the papacy itself needed reform. This reading course on late medieval history will chart the apparent sea-change of sentiment. If such a shift represented the failure of a reforming papacy's agenda, it might nonetheless be seen as a victory for the concept of reform itself. But a slogan like reformatio ecclesiae could mean many things and was employed by different individuals or groups, each to their own purpose. In examining the writings of churchmen, heretics, poets and mystics on this fundamental theme, we will also explore a number of related issues: orthodox versus heretical doctrine, clerical versus lay religiosity, vernacular versus Latin theology, male versus female spirituality, and monarchical versus communal ecclesiology.

Texts include:

  • G. Constable, The Reformation of the Twelfth Century (Princeton, 1998)
  • A. Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars (Yale, 1994) H. Grundmann, Religious Movements in the Middle Ages (Notre Dame, 1996)
  • M. Lambert, Medieval Heresy: Popular Movements from the Gregorian Reform to the Reformation (3rd edition. Blackwell, 2002)
  • R.N. Swanson, Religion and Devotion in Europe, ca. 1215-1515 (Cambridge, 1995)
  • G. Tellenbach, The Church in Western Europe from the Tenth to the Early Twelfth Century (Cambridge, 1993)

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HISTORY 641. Studies in 20th-Century European History.

Section 001 — Civil, Social & Cultural Citizenship in 19th Century Germany. Meets with German 822.002.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is aimed at graduate students who are specializing in modern German or European history, German or European literature or cultural studies. Its chronological time frame encompasses the period from 1800 to the end of the Kaiserreich in 1918. Course readings will include classics and more recent historical studies, as well as key nineteenth-century texts (Marx, Weber, Tönnies, for example). The course will explore the thematics of civil society, public sphere, and citizenship; the changing face of the state (nation-state, Kulturstaat, welfare state); and the meanings of nation across the changing boundaries of local, national and empire, examining how these categories and institutions were transformed across this long century. Because this course considers histories of practices as well as languages, institutions as well as ideologies, our readings will include texts in social, cultural and intellectual history. We will also pay attention to the shifts in historical methodologies, from political and social history of the 1970s and 1980s, to more recent studies in cultural and intellectual history, gender and cultural studies. In our readings and discussions we will explore the ways in which the distinctions of ethnicity, race, religion, gender, class and Stand shaped the realms of civic, public, state, nation and empire.

Requirements: One short midterm essay, weekly or bi-weekly bibliographies, and one longer paper at the end of the term. Each student will introduce the readings two or three times during the academic term, depending on the size of the class. Readings will generally be in English with occasional recommended alternative readings for students who read German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTORY 659. Studies in British History.

Section 001 — Influential, Challenging, or Innovative Works in Modern British History, from the late 18th Century to the Present.

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a graduate seminar focused on reading and discussion of a range of influential, challenging, or innovative works in modern British history, from the late 18th century to the present. Readings will be mostly comprised of works in social and cultural history but we will also read some works in political history and attend to some ongoing political arguments within historical scholarship. We will also read fiction and some non-fiction literary prose. Themes which will recur throughout the course include narratives of nation and empire; representations of class, gender, and sexuality; religion; education; and visual and literary cultures. This course will provide a good frame for students pursuing major or minor fields in British history or those hoping for useful comparisons to their own geographic fields; it is also highly suitable for students from outside the history department who wish to explore some themes in British historical scholarship. Assignments will include short papers and one longer essay on a topic of your choice.

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HISTORY 667. The Ancient Empires of Southeast Asia.

Section 001 — Meets with HISTORY 469.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines select problems in the history of both mainland and island Southeast Asia from the start of the first millennium C.E. to the early 19th century, on the eve of colonial rule. Its focus is simultaneously political, cultural, and economic. It seeks to explain why, particularly on the mainland, localized political and economic systems coalesced with increasing speed and success, chiefly from the 15th century, and why similar integrative trends in the island world were less sustained. But at the same time it seeks to explore in open-ended fashion the relation between international and domestic economic stimuli, cultural importation and cultural creativity, institutional demands and patrimonial norms. Principal thematic topics include: Indianization, the rise of the classical states and their chief features, the collapse of the classical states, reintegration on the mainland, the age of commerce thesis, comparisons between Theravada, Neo-Confucian, the Muslim Southeast Asia, the early role of Europeans, the 18th century crises, Southeast Asia on the eve of colonial intervention.

Requirements: Meets weekly, two to three research papers using secondary sources, no final exam, all graduate and advanced undergraduates welcome.

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HISTORY 668 / CHIN 668. Studies in Early Chinese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a proseminar in premodern Chinese history before 1800. The main focus of the course is on the examination of the development of the field, the current state of research, and the various methodological approaches in the studies of premodern Chinese history. The topics include the following:

  1. Approaches to Chinese historical analysis
  2. The origins of Chinese civilization and state
  3. Ancient China in transition: feudalism, social-economic-political changes, and the age of philosophers
  4. Early Imperial China: the Ch'in-Han Empires
  5. Middle Imperial China
  6. Later Imperial China: the Sung and the Yuan
  7. Late Imperial China: Ming and early Ch'ing

Each year, four or five of these topics are selected for study through weekly readings and discussions. The readings are selected from English language materials only. Course requirements: a term paper and short reports.

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HISTORY 673. Studies in Pre-Modern Japanese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces major English-language works on Japan's premodern history (before 1700). Readings are selected to promote our familiarity and critical appreciation of the key problems, themes, and trends which have shaped the historiography. We will evaluate individual works in terms of their approach, methodology, and argumentation. Our discussion will emphasize these works' merits, limitations, and relative significance to the field. We will also consider unexplored issues and problems as well as possible alternate approaches and methods which might be employed to conduct historical inquiry in this field. The course may serve as the first stage of preparation for taking the Ph.D. examinations and for teaching premodern Japanese history at a college level.

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HISTORY 680. Studies in Early American History I.

Section 001 — Violence in Early America.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/680/001.nsf

Colonial North America was a violent place: Indian wars, religious persecution, judicial torture, corporal punishment, racial slavery, agrarian rebellions, domestic abuse, urban riots, ecological destruction, all contributed to an environment marked by extraordinarily high levels of personal and collective aggression. This course will examine the multiple ways that violence marked British North America, from both a historical and a theoretical perspective: we will consider specific instances of violent behavior (both sanctioned and illicit) in the 17th and 18th centuries, from Indian torture rituals to religious martyrdom, as well as theories of the role of pain and aggression in ordering and disciplining a colonial society.

Texts will include classic theoretical formulations of early modern disciplinary regimes as well as historical monographs and some primary texts.

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HISTORY 683. Studies in the United States History: 1815-1865.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J. Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of the historiography of the United States in the period from 1815-1865.

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HISTORY 688. Studies in Twentieth-Century American History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/688/001.nsf

Graduate seminar in Twentieth-Century U.S. history, emphasizing a metropolitan approach to and spatial analysis of the post-1940 period, from the Great Migration through contemporary debates regarding public policy, the inner-city, underclass, and suburban sprawl. From a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches, the readings probe the intersection of race, class, gender, neighborhood, grassroots movements, and structural forces on the developmental landscape of metropolitan America. The title of the course is not intended to imply fixed categories in a metropolitan dichotomy, but instead the intertwined discourses of urban crisis, and suburban nation, which we will approach skeptically and investigate thoroughly. Did the same policies that built the sprawling suburbs also produce the urban crisis? How does a metropolitan approach to postwar American recast historiographical debates about racial and class consciousness, public policy and political realignment, the rise and fall of the New Deal Order?

Case studies of key cities and regions are interspersed with synthetic works and policy analyses that address such topics as the forging of inner-city and middle-class popular culture; the postwar reconstruction of the "American Dream"; the power shift from Rust Belt to Sunbelt; the intersection of market forces, state policy, and private action in urban space; and the emerging, interdisciplinary, postsuburban, synthesis. Interested graduate students are invited to contact the instructor for information about the course and the syllabus.

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HISTORY 696. Studies in Ottoman History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar provides an introduction to the broader context of Turkish history. We will look at the interplay of Ottoman and Turkic society with the wider world, emphasizing the social, cultural, economic, scientific, and historiographical relations with the Mediterranean and Europe, beginning with the later Middle Ages and The Renaissance, and arriving in modern times.

Knowledge of Turkish is not a requirement for this seminar.

We will work with and against a backdrop of recent literature on the wider Mediterranean world, including recent cross-cultural studies.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 — Theory and Cultural Capital.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Theory appears to be a flag under which many a ship with undeclared cargo sails across the disciplines. Often suspected of being a foreign import of dubious origin and questionable value, whatever passes as "theory" seems at once desirable and superfluous, at once a vital stimulus for robust scholarly production and a dire threat to the domestic economy of empirical scholarship. Is "Theory" really any of these things?

This is a reading-oriented seminar covering very recent intellectual history-roughly from the onset of "poststructuralism" in the 1960s to the sedimentation of "cultural studies" and "postcolonial criticism" in the 1990s. We will examine some of the authors and texts that became — for whatever reason — cornerstones of this history. The principal objective, however, is not a historiography of the recent but rather a critical assessment of the complex interrelation among several prominent sites of theory production/consumption-in particular, literary studies, anthropology, and history.

Readings may include:

  • Derek Attridge, Geoff Bennington and Robert Young, eds., Post-Structuralism and the Question of History (1987)
  • Pierre Bourdieu, Algeria 1960 (1979)
  • Teresa de Lauretis, selected essays from Alice Doesn't: feminism, semiotics, cinema (1984) and Technologies of Gender: essays on theory, film, and fiction (1987)
  • Jacques Derrida, selected essays from Writing and Difference (1967/1978) and Margins of Philosophy (1972/1982)
  • Paul de Man, selected essays from Allegories of Reading (1979) and The Resistance to Theory (1986)
  • Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization: a history of insanity in the age of reason (1961/1965)
  • Michel Foucault, selected essays from Language, Counter-Memory, Practice (1977)
  • Jane Gallop, selected essays from The Daughter's Seduction: feminism and psychoanalysis (1982) and Reading Lacan (1985)
  • John Guillory, Cultural Capital: the problem of literary canon formation (1993)
  • Christopher Herbert, Culture and Anomie: ethnographic imagination in the 19th century (1990)
  • Richard Macksey & Eugenio Donato, eds., The Structuralist Controversy: the languages of criticism and the sciences of man (1970)
  • Timothy Mitchell, Colonising Egypt (1988)
  • Robert Young, White Mythologies: Writing History and the West (1990)

Other authors may include: Dipesh Chakrabarty, Tom Cohen, Peggy Kamuf, Jacques Lacan, Nancy Miller, William Pietz, Gayle Rubin, Gayatri Spivak, Michael Taussig, Samuel Weber

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 002 — Processing the Past: Experience, Authority, & the Institutions of Social Memory.

Instructor(s): William Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu) , Francis X Blouin Jr (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This colloquium takes up the "social memory" question, exploring the various ways societies institutionalize and authenticate social experience and memory, and create "authoritative" understandings of their pasts. It will be concerned with the literature on what Pierre Nora has called "places of memory", including archives, museums, exhibitions, and memorials, as well as that on social memory itself. Using specific European and American cases that illustrate the contentious relationships between memory and historical narrative, the course will also examine the growing "divide" between the ways "history", "memory", and "experience" are increasingly being documented and archived. The course is open to all graduate students regardless of their field of specialization. Advanced undergraduates may be admitted with permission of the instructors.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 003 — Comparative Sexual Narratives: Africa & the Americas. Meets with American Culture 699.006 & CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Mamadou Diouf

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 699.006.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 004 — Seeing (in) Early Modern Europe. Meets with Art History 655.001 and German 821.001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu), Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 821.001.

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HISTORY 698. Topics in History.

Section 005 — History of American Urban Education. Meets with Education 741.001.

Instructor(s): Mirel

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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HISTORY 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows faculty to offer required seminar work to graduate students on an individual basis during terms when their regular seminars are not scheduled to be offered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 702. Seminar in Ancient History II.

Section 001 — Late Antiquity. Meets with History 633.001.

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey selected aspects of Late Antiquity, in particular the social and cultural dynamics of the ancient Mediterranean world from 300 to 750. Requirements will include participation in the class discussions of the assigned reading, short written reviews, an oral presentation of a research project, and an extended paper on that project. Students will be encouraged to develop a project that makes use of their primary interests in Greek and Roman history, art and archaeology, classical studies, or Near Eastern studies.

As HISTORY 633 this is a studies course, for which the final project should be a survey of current bibliography and research on some topic. A studies course would be more appropriate for students from other programs hoping to satisfy a requirement for a course in ancient history. As HISTORY 702 this is a research seminar, for which the final project should be based upon research in primary texts as well as current bibliography. A research seminar would be more appropriate for students planning to specialize in Roman history or late antique studies.

Questions or comments? Please contact Professor Van Dam at (rvandam@umich.edu).

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HISTORY 749. Seminar in Modern Near Eastern History.

Section 001 — Islamic Politics in the Modern World.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of French or Arabic. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on Islamic Politics in the Modern World and will involve both a consideration of recent contributions to the scholarly literature and student projects on the subject working from primary sources. The grade will depend on class participation, the student presentation of the project, and the resulting term paper.

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HISTORY 793 / MENAS 695 / AAPTIS 793. The Study of the Near East.

Section 001 — Culture & Politics in the Contemporary Middle East. Meets with Anthropology 558.001.

Instructor(s): Marcia C Inhorn (minhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Middle Eastern and North African Studies 695.001.

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HISTORY 798 / CAAS 798. Seminar in Comparative Studies in History.

Section 001 — Getting the Documents to Speak.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu), Jean M Hebrard

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/history/798/001.nsf

How do historians build up a narrative from the raw materials with which they work? In particular, how can researchers use fragmentary documents from the past to develop interpretations and stories that reveal the workings of the societies that they study? By asking about the cultural practice of writing in particular contexts, and about the circumstances under which written texts are produced, we may be able to treat documents as objects as well as sources, and better understand their relationship to the history that we seek to study.

This research seminar is designed to frame the ongoing — and necessarily disparate — research projects of the participating students within a shared discussion of questions of method and craft. We will, for example, pay particular attention to the difficulties of working with judicial documents, to the complexities of writing about slavery and popular mobilization, and to the challenge of incorporating both oral-historical and written materials in a single inquiry. A working assumption of the seminar is that reflection of this kind works best when it crosses and re-crosses national and linguistic boundaries. The instructors themselves come from different scholarly traditions and regional specializations, and the readings and documents will be drawn from multiple countries and languages.

Students will engage in intensive historical research in primary sources over the course of the academic term, aimed at the production of a monographic essay with the potential to become a published essay. Research topics may be chosen from any time period between the sixteenth century and the twentieth, with a focus on Europe, the Americas, and the larger Atlantic world. Mastery of at least one of the appropriate languages of research — generally Spanish, Portuguese, or French — is assumed.

Readings will include articles, primary documents, and the following books:

  • Natalie Davis, Fiction in the Archives
  • Joao José Reis, Slave Rebellion in Brazil
  • George Lamming, In the Castle of My Skin
  • Arlette Farge and Jacques Revel, The Vanishing Children of Paris

UMCoursetools site:
A site, https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/workspaces/rjscott/005.nsf,has been established for this course. Anyone may visit the site to download the draft syllabus, and all registered students will automatically be authorized as full participants on the site.

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HISTORY 801. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 803. Reading for the General Examination.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for preparation of a special topic or area no adequately covered by regular courses. A faculty member willing to offer this course for an individual graduate student set formal requirements and evaluates performance just as in a regular class. This course has a grading basis of "Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory"

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 807. Historical Theory and Pedagogy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the practical application of recent historical theories to the instructional experience. It is designed for those who are serving as Graduate Instructors for the first time, usually in the second year of the doctoral program. The work-load and reading list is customized to the individual needs and interests of each student.

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HISTORY 812. Seminar on History Pedagogy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Second-year graduate standing or higher. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of HISTORY 812 is to prepare students for the rigors of running a college-level history course. The course deals with practical "how-to" issues about course design, grading, lecturing, moderating discussions, etc., and also explores some of the broader issues and controversies of the pedagogical side of the historical profession.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The essay is a substantial research paper reflecting interdisciplinary training and the ability to use the Western language literature and Chinese language sources. It is normally written in the three-credit interdepartmental research seminars (825 or 802) and registered for under the department most closely aligned with the thesis topic and readers. The essay must be read and approved by two Center for Chinese Studies faculty members from different disciplines, both of whom will grade it. Preliminary work on the Master's Essay could begin in any of the advanced research/writing courses. Students may petition to use two seminar papers that have received grades of "A" as a substitute for the Master's Essay. All such petitions should be submitted to the China Center as formal letters of request and accompanied by complete copies of both of the graded papers. These petitions will be forwarded for review by a committee selected by the CCS Director and consisting of at least two faculty members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Ph.D. candidacy status. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the Dissertation Colloquium for doctoral students nearing the job market stage is required, although official enrollment for one credit is optional.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an ungraded course of one to six credits which students nearing their preliminary examination elect. It may be taken in the term before or during which the student plans to take the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTORY 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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