College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 6:23 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 424 / CLARCH 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emma Blake

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 424.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 431 / AMCULT 433. Made in Detroit: A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history, U.S. history, American culture, or urban studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century" played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This course will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 443 / CLARCH 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 443.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 462. Baroque Art in Italy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102 or 260. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course pretends to identify the most historically significant, intellectually stimulating, and moving achievements in the development of Italian Baroque painting, from the late-16th C. stirrings of a new way of seeing and working to the spectacular ceiling frescoes of the late 17th C. Following a detailed syllabus, it focuses on such artists as Caravaggio, Annibale Carracci, Artemisia Gentileschi, Guido Reni, Guercino, and Pietro da Cortona, and upon the cities of Rome, Bologna, and Naples. The art — religious subject matter, history, mythology, portraits, landscapes, genre, and still-life — will be studied for what it reveals of individual creative genius, of socio/political/religious aspirations, and of shared features which together might be said to constitute a concept of the Baroque. Students with formal training in the history of art (HISTART 102 or HISTART 260, for example) and with an enthusiastic desire to become involved with the visual material and the literature of the field (a course pack will be provided) are most welcome. Evaluation will be by way of two exams (midterm and final) and a short museum paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 — Art and Archaeology along the Silk Road. Fulfills HA concentration/minor seminar requirement. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The floating of merchandise and ideas between Chang'an and Rome in the first millennium left us not only a romantic memory about ancient travelers but also abundant treasures buried along the so-called Silk Road connecting the East and the West. Explorers and archaeologists from Europe, America, and Japan made astonishing discoveries of ancient artifacts and ruined cities in the Gobi deserts in central Asia in the early 20th century. Motivated by political, economic, and cultural purposes, these archaeological discoveries provide us with important references on the art and culture of the people who once lived and traveled along the route. The transfer of the artifacts from their original locations to the native countries of the archaeologists also illuminates the issues of colonialism, nationalism, and cultural politics. This course examines the major archaeological finds along the Silk Road in the 20th century and interprets the social-political-cultural implications of archaeology in a modern context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 — Art in Russia and Imperial Patronage, 1703-1917. Meets September 16 - November 11. [2 credits]. (Drop/Add deadline=September 24).

Instructor(s): Alexander Potts (adpotts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

mini/short

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be team-taught by two visiting curators/art historians from the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg and will feature European painting, drawing, furniture, porcelain, silver, and textiles that are part of the Fall 2003 Hermitage exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Students will be expected to attend Boris Godunov, which is being performed at U-M from October 29-November 2.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 536 / CLARCH 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sculptures in marble, bronze, and other media played a major role in the construction and presentation of elite and non-elite self-images, ideologies and aspirations in the Hellenistic and Roman world. Sculptors drew upon a variety of by then traditional classical and non-classical artistic forms to create new and often original works for rulers and their regimes, for wealthy private citizens, and for those of lesser means. Lectures and class discussions will focus on political and social uses of sculptural images from the late 4th century BC to the 4th century AD but will emphasize the Roman era. Topics will include (among others): the role of sculpture in negotiations of individual, class, gender, and ethnic identities; iconographies of power; the phenomena of artistic appropriation, imitation and emulation; Roman concepts of decorum, aesthetics and visuality; the collecting and reuse of older sculptures (both in antiquity and in modern times); the structure of the sculpture "industry;" and technical as well as formal developments in Hellenistic and Roman sculpture. Lectures will be based primarily on slides, but the class will examine original sculptures whenever possible. There will be a midterm and final. An object-based project at the Kelsey Museum will require a short paper (approx. 4 pages) within the first three weeks of the term. A second paper based on research will be due four weeks after the midterm. Graduate students will write a 15-page research paper. Undergraduates will write a shorter paper (5-7 pages), which may be based on an object in a local collection. Foreign languages are not required for undergraduates, but it is expected that graduate students will use foreign language sources (e.g., German, French and/or Italian) in their research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 555. Renaissance Architecture in Italy.

Section 001 — Meets with Architecture 518.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101 or 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/arch/518/001.nsf

The course examines the architecture of the Renaissance; the buildings and cities of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy, France and England. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Renaissance, including philosophical, religious, political, economic and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 580. Twentieth-Century Masters.

Section 001 — Romare Bearden.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102, 272. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Painter and collage artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988) worked in social realist, figural abstract, non-objective styles, and in a variety of media. The first third of Bearden's career (1930-1950) was modestly successful, the second (1960-1988) generated solid praise for his black genre representations, interpretations of myth and folklore, and avant-garde practice. Posthumously, a third phase shall commence in September 2003 when the National Gallery of Art opens a major Bearden retrospective. This exhibition will be an unprecedented event in the history of an institution that has infrequently honored modernists, and even more rarely, African-American artists of any period. Our class will visit the Washington, D.C. display for it marks a significant revisionist moment. Bearden, already a "black master" (along with Henry Ossawa Tanner, William H. Johnson, Archibald J. Motley, and Jacob Lawrence), will likely join the American modernist pantheon of Pollock, de Kooning, Johns, and Rauschenberg. What brings the conferral of mastery to an artist's enterprise? Bearden's production and its reception shall be the case study in our consideration of canons and their authority. Course shall be conducted as combination of lecture and discussion. Requirements include research papers, summaries, exams, and oral presentation. There are no prerequisites, but students who have previous art history course work will reap the greatest benefits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 603. Independent Study in Asian Art.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of graduate advisor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 615. First Year Graduate Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Simon Elmer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The seminar will introduce new graduate students in the History of Art to one of the most important methodological problems of their chosen discipline: the tension between, on the one hand, "formalism" (the study of art as an autonomous enterprise wherein the formal elements and organization of specific works are analyzed chiefly in terms of their transformation of preexisting material, whether of the outside world or previous works), and on the other, "contextualism" (an approach which seeks to reintegrate the work of art within the context of its making and consumption, foregrounding its status as both historical document and act of social communication). Through a reading of major critical texts by Riegl, Wölfflin, Marx, Engels, Saussure, Shklovskii, Jakobson, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin/Medvedev, Benjamin, Barr, Schapiro, Greenberg, Antal, Hauser, Barthes, Bois, Krauss, Jameson, Clark and others, this tension will be examined in its chief historical articulations from the late-19th century to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 646. Problems in Medieval Art.

Section 001 — Medieval Art "Theory".

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on documents, textual and pictorial, revealing of medieval understandings of art and art-making, especially in the Latin West. We will submit to scrutiny a range of texts written over many centuries, from antique texts read in the Middle Ages (Pliny, Horace) through influential ruminations of the Church Fathers (Augustine, Gregory) and important early medieval discussions of religious art (Theodulf of Orléans, Jonas of Orléans), to high medieval monastic and scholastic texts (Bernard of Clairvaux, Suger, Hugh of St.Victor, Thomas Aquinas) and vernacular writings of the late Middle Ages (Guillaume de Machaut, etc.). We will study medieval rhetorical theory and works of ekphrasis as a way of retrieving categories applicable to visual styles and modes. Literary evocations of art and artists will come into play, as will non-literary documents (guild regulations, household accounts, inventories). In every case, we will study medieval texts in relation to relevant works of art. The secondary literature on medieval art writing grows ever more extensive, and we will examine these recent texts in conjunction with the primary sources. The seminar is open to students in any field interested in pre-modern notions of art — its powers and dangers, its origins, its functions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 655. Studies in the History of the History of Art.

Section 001 — Seeing (in) Early Modern Europe. Meets with History 698.004 and German 821.001.

Instructor(s): Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu) , Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See German 821.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 677. Studies in American Art.

Section 001 — Made in Detroit: Art & Culture in the Motor City. Meets with AMCULT 699.002.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "Modern Times" was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century" played an important symbolic role for modern artists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place. This class will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880's to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined technology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 700. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized student non-thesis research under the supervision of History of Art faculty. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

HISTART 720 / WOMENSTD 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts.

Section 001 — Case Studies from Prehistory to the Renaissance.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu) , Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes visual representation of gender and sexuality in relation to an intersection with race and ethnicity. Our case studies reflect the interests of the co-teachers Root (Classical and Near Eastern Art and Archaeology) and Simons (Renaissance Art and Gender/Sexuality Studies). For example, theories regarding nineteenth-century Orientalism will be examined in conjunction with studies of practices in the ancient world. Visual markers of genital difference (including the phallus), from prehistory to the Renaissance, will be investigated alongside psychoanalytic theory. At all times we take account of the dynamics of empire and the construction of gender roles and sexual identities within socially specific circumstances. The course is intended as a guide for students in a variety of disciplines who wish to investigate theories and complexities of visual analysis by considering the lively problematics of gender, sexuality and race. Readings (in English), drawn from multiple traditions, are placed in dialogue with a compelling corpus of images.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 773. Problems in Art of the Twentieth Century.

Section 001 — The European and American Art World at the Mid-Century: Between Commitment and Consumerism.

Instructor(s): Alexander Potts (adpotts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be explore the various impulses shaping artistic practice and critical writing on art in mid-twentieth century Europe and America, focusing on the post-war period from the later 1940s through to the late 1960s. The idea of a modern art began to gain hegemonic status during the period, and there was intensive speculation about what a distinctively modern art was, including its formal qualities and its underlying ideological and psychological dimensions. A structural tension is evident between a preoccupation with the ethical basis of art — with the commitments, whether formal or political, endowing art with some necessity and sense of purpose — and a fascination with an art practice that would be immersed the fabric of everyday life and would engage with the new post-war consumerism and its economies of desire and visual spectacle. So, on the one hand, we can identify a quasi-heroic stance. This could take the form of a forward-looking modernising subject fighting for a progressive agenda; or alternatively, of an isolated, disillusioned subject seeking some measure of personal authenticity, however bleak and circumscribed, in a world where public life was compromised and revolutionary aspiration negated. On the other hand, there emerged among the artistic avant-garde a casual stance, seeking a very different sense of purpose by negating high aesthetic or ethical pretensions, and pursuing a playful or ironic engagement with what Claes Oldenbrug called 'everyday crap', 'blurring', Kaprow put it, 'art and life'. We shall be exploring the very different ways in which artistic subjectivity was being configured at the time, and how these notions of artistic subjectivity played off against the imperatives to produce a new kind of public art or at least to engage directly with everyday 'nonartistic' interests and concerns. We shall be examining the obsessive fascination with things and materials and the fabric of sensory experience, in an art world that was rejecting traditional understandings of medium while becoming obsessed with the idea that 'the medium is the message.'

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

HISTART 815 / CLARCH 815. Hellenistic Cities of the Near East.

Section 001 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Sharon C Herbert (sherbert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 815.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 844 / CLARCH 844. Theoretical Issues in Archaeology.

Section 001 — Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Greek Oikos.

Instructor(s): Lisa Nevett

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 844.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 993. GSI Training.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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This page was created at 6:23 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.


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