College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 6:23 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


POLSCI 407. Marxism and 20th-Century Radicalism.

Theory

Section 001 — The Soviet Experiment.

Instructor(s): Gordon N Harding (nharding@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course could be subtitled "The Soviet Experiment"; not because it is a course on Soviet politics, but because it will focus on the evolution and implications of Marxist/communist ideas.

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POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/409/001.nsf

This course offers a chronological survey of some central contributions to contemporary political thought. Its premise is that 20th-century political thinkers have offered us different (a) vocabularies to understand modern political world and (b) arguments for why and how we should try to change that world. Beginning with the German sociologist Max Weber and ending with the South African novelist J. M. Coetzee, the course draws from contributions outside political theory proper. Since most of the 20th-century political thought consists of developments of and reactions to the 19th-century legacies of liberalism and Marxism, familiarity with the key theories in modern political thought is strongly recommended. The course is writing-intensive.

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POLSCI 432. Law and Public Policy.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marvin Krislov

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/432/001.nsf

This course will focus on the ways our courts do and do not intervene in politics and the political process, both on the federal and state level. Topics to be covered include: the regulation of voting, voting rights, the Census, Congressional reapportionment, campaign finance, and the selection (or election) of federal and state judges. There will be a team research project, midterm and final.

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POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in political science. Prerequisites enforced at registration. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course studies "empirical democratic theory," that is, democracy not as an abstract principle, but as a reality. We will cover the history of the American party system, with a special emphasis on the state of Michigan.

Beginning with the pre-Civil War period, the readings and lectures will treat the shifts in public opinion that give rise to new popular movements and pressure groups, which then modify or destroy the contemporary party system.

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POLSCI 500. First Year Colloquium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to provide graduate students interested in academic careers with an introduction to our profession. We will alternate between sessions with invited members of our department that focus on major subfields (e.g., political theory, world politics, comparative politics, etc.) and sessions that focus on topics often untouched in traditional graduate programs (e.g., faculty roles, ethics, governance, etc.). This course is highly recommended for first-year PhD students but is also suitable for others who anticipate faculty careers.

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POLSCI 514. The Use of Social Science Computer Programs.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: POLSCI 499. Permission of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Practical experience in the use of a system of computer programs for social scientists.

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POLSCI 560 / PUBPOL 560. Foreign Policy and the Management of International Relations.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Waltz

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 560.001.

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POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Van Houweling

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.001.

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POLSCI 585 / PUBPOL 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Public Policy

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Hall

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/585/001.nsf

See Public Policy 585.002.

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POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-8). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science.

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

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POLSCI 599. Statistical Methods in Political Research I.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy E Burns (nburns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; concurrent election of POLSCI 514 is strongly recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/599/001.nsf

This is the first course in statistics requiring little or no previous exposure to the subject. Topics covered include probability theory, sampling distributions, sampling theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, and strategies of data analysis. POLSCI 514, Introduction to the Social Science Computer, is strongly recommended to be taken concurrently with POLSCI 599.

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POLSCI 599. Statistical Methods in Political Research I.

Methods

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; concurrent election of POLSCI 514 is strongly recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first course in statistics requiring little or no previous exposure to the subject. Topics covered include probability theory, sampling distributions, sampling theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, and strategies of data analysis. POLSCI 514, Introduction to the Social Science Computer, is strongly recommended to be taken concurrently with POLSCI 599.

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POLSCI 604. Democratic Theory.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the theoretical underpinnings of democratic regimes through a study of the differences between modern and ancient democracy, between democracy and republicanism, between democracy and liberalism. The continuing theme that will run through these comparisons will be the meaning of citizenship — who is the citizen and the contemporary extension in issues of identity, exclusion and inclusion; the citizen as the bearer of rights; the citizen as participant and the contemporary extension in theories of deliberative democracy; assumptions of rationality; radical critiques of democracy.

Texts will include classic works from the canon of political theory such as Aristotle's Politics, Rousseau's Social Contract, readings from the Federalist Papers and Anti-Federalists, J.S. Mill's Considerations on Representative Government, Freud, Michael Oakeshott, Walter Lippmann and John Dewey, as well as more recent articles on the issues raised by these authors.

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POLSCI 611. Proseminar in American National Government.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce graduate students to the major theoretical concepts in the study of American politics. Students will have the opportunity to read books and articles from a wide range of topics, including studies of American legislatures, courts, executives, bureaucracies, elections, mass opinion and behavior, and constitutional law. Several short papers and a seminar paper are the written assignments.

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POLSCI 636 / PUBPOL 636. Program Evaluation I.

Public Policy

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Schoeni

Prerequisites: ECON 571 or concurrent enrollment in PUBPOL 633. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Public Policy 636.001.

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POLSCI 641. Proseminar in Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Anne Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/641/001.nsf

Introduces the study of comparative politics at the graduate level. The course proceeds thematically and surveys important parts of the canon on each of 12 subjects, including state-building, violence, democratization, electoral institutions, political party behavior, public policy, political culture, good government, etc. Each discussion draws out important concepts, theories, and methodological maxims. The reading list is the core of the comparative politics preliminary exam; thus, this course is "bootcamp" for Ph.D. students studying comparative politics as a major or a minor field. The course is designed to be taken in a student's first year, although it may be taken later if necessary. Depending on size, it may be limited to political science graduate students only.

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POLSCI 642. Proseminar in the Government and Politics of Western Europe.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Thunert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Politics in Western Europe is changing in dramatic and often contradictory ways. Many observers see economic globalization, technological change, increasing integration within the European Union, immigration, and new security threats as major challenges to the role and capacity of the European nation-state.

After a comprehensive theory-driven and institutions-orientated review of the main characteristics of representative government in modern Europe, the course will focus on questions of democratic performance such as the quality of democracy in Europe as well as on the institutional capacities of European states to deal with the major challenges and to deliver effective governance. It is not primarily a course on European Union politics, although the structure and the performance of the emerging EU political system will be discussed. The course will alternate between comparative approaches and country-specific analyses of European politics.

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POLSCI 649. Politics and Society in Latin America.

Comparative

Section 001 — Democracy and Elections in Latin America.

Instructor(s): Jose E Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/649/001.nsf

This seminar will look at the state of democracy and elections in Latin America, and the factors linked to their stability and problems, in the region as a whole, and in some specific countries. Several cases will be examined closely, so as to have an in depth look at the different situations and problems faced by Latin American democracy. The students will be asked to write a research paper on one of the issues covered, focusing either in one or several countries.

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POLSCI 651. Proseminar in Political Economy.

Comparative

Section 001 — Advanced Political Economy: Positive Macro-Political Economy.

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu) , Jude C Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This reading list is intended as an introduction to positive macro-political economy. Specifically, it focuses on how certain political configurations (institutions, structures, etc.) and events (elections, coups, etc.) systematically produce certain sorts of economic policies and on how these contexts might condition the effects of the policy so made. In other words, the course takes political economy primarily to mean the politics and economics of macro- and international economic policy-making as opposed to (at least) three other broad areas of inquiry also referred to as political economy:
(a) the (micro-)economics of politics, which studies how self-interested, rational policy-makers make choices in a institutionalized environment, employing the utility-maximization theories and tools of microeconomics;
(b) normative political economy, which studies, alternatively, what economic policy should be enacted so as to produce ideal effects or what policy would be enacted under some set of ideal circumstances which do not necessarily (and often will likely not) obtain; and
(c) the political consequences of economic outcomes wherein political effects are treated as outputs of (usually exogenous) economic causes, e.g., the impact of unemployment on presidential approval.

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POLSCI 655. Proseminar in Japanese Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. No prior knowledge of Japan is assumed. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We look at Japan through lenses of theories about politics, and vice versa. We usually cover quite a range of topics, including political culture, conflict resolution and other social and legal processes, grassroots politics, voting behavior, the decision-making process, substantive public policy both foreign and domestic (particularly industrial, economic, and social policy), and more. Our typical questions for each topic: is Japan distinctive? If so, why? Are things changing? Students write a research paper on a topic that is lightly negotiated with the instructor, and they write two assigned short papers based on the readings. At its best, the course prepares students for teaching Japanese politics at the undergraduate level, and gets them to think about the kinds of politics that interest them from a different angle.

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POLSCI 660. Proseminar in World Politics.

World

Section 001 — Research Frontiers of World Politics.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/660/001.nsf

This course introduces the graduate student to the research frontiers of world politics. It proceeds by covering important books and recent areas of research in international conflict and political economy. The course is conducted as a seminar to discuss the readings and possible research topics that follow from those readings. Students are expected to write a number of short papers and a final research design paper.

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POLSCI 670. Proseminar in Comparative Foreign Policy.

World

Section 001 — Foreign Policy Decision Making.

Instructor(s): Zeev Maoz

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/670/001.nsf

This course examines theories and evidence on how top government officials make foreign policy decisions. It focuses on individual choice, group decision making and intergroup interaction. The theoretical approaches covered include rational decision theory, cognitive and psychological approaches (including prospect theory), bureaucratic politics, and social choice approaches in decision making processes. We will devote special attention to serial decision processes, emphasizing issues such as entrapment, long-range planning, and manipulation of decision processes. Course requirements include a literature review paper, an experimental project report, and a research paper.

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POLSCI 680. Proseminar in Behavioral Research Methods.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as an introduction to study design, strategies, data collection, and measurement in empirical political science. Emphasis is placed on eclecticism and demonstration by example. Oral presentations and discussion are a regular part of the course. Requirements include a series of brief papers plus a longer paper due at the end of the term, which usually takes the form of a complete, detailed, and polished research proposal.

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POLSCI 682. Democratization in Global Perspectives.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the basic literature and recent findings on democratization, starting with its background in Western advanced industrial societies and then examining its prospects in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, China, Latin America, and Africa. We will seek to answer three questions: "What are the essential characteristics of democracy?" "What conditions are conducive to the emergence and survival of democracy?" and "What good is it?"

Each participant will present three brief essays, each one being a critical discussion of the readings assigned during a given week. These are to be presented orally (in 10-15 minutes) in class during the week of the assignment, with appropriate handouts to guide the discussion; a typed version (4 to 6 pages) will be due the following week. Each of these essays will account for 25% of the final grade; the later essays should reflect a broader comparative perspective than the earlier ones. Well-informed participation in seminar discussions is important, and will count for 25% of the final grade. There will be no exams.

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POLSCI 685 / SOC 651. Proseminar in Electoral Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps685f03.html

This course surveys major themes in theory and research on political participation, with some emphasis on voting and elections. Students will be expected to evaluate the readings critically in our class discussions and in their weekly papers. Most of the time, specific students will be assigned responsibility for leading class discussion of the readings for the following week. All students are responsible for reading all of the required pieces and participating in the discussions. Half of your course grade will be based on your papers; the other half will be based on your contributions to our discussions.

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POLSCI 686. Proseminar in Public Opinion.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cara J Wong (cjwong@umich.edu) , Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is as much about the study of public opinion as about public opinion itself. The course briefly considers the meaning and measurement of the concept and the origins of contemporary research. The course examines a number of critical, classic debates about mass beliefs with implications for the quality of democratic citizenship, including voter rationality, political tolerance, racial attitudes and party identification. The course then review more recent efforts to explain and model opinion formation — economic or identity-driven, self-interested or symbolic, cognitive or emotional, including the impact of the mass media, election campaigns, and the social and political context. Finally the course considers the larger consequences of public opinion, including aggregate and long-term shifts, as well as the responsiveness of political leaders to opinion polls.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 001 — Comparative Public Policy.

Instructor(s): Allen D Hicken (ahicken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to a variety of literatures that seek to explain public policy, with a particular but not exclusive emphasis on economic policy. Issues addressed in the course include preference formation, collective action problems and the role of political institutions/structures in policy making. The course will draw on examples from around the world, but will give special attention to public policy in East Asia and Latin America.

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 002 — Political Economy - East Asia.

Instructor(s): Meredith Woo-Cumings (mwoc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

East Asia is an enormously heterogeneous and diverse area, and cannot be reduced to a single model of political economy. But as we think of the region historically and try to understand the complex interplay of forces — historical, political, market, security — that have determined the structure of opportunity in East Asia, it would appear that there are indeed three distinct paradigms of development in the region.

The first paradigm is the developmentalism of Northeast Asia, found in the countries that once formed the core of the prewar Japanese empire, and whose economic structures were tightly interwoven and articulated. These economies have tendencies that are manufacture — and trade-oriented under multi-year plans, guided by strong state ministries — and with deep security ties and trade dependence to the United States.

The second paradigm consists of the economies of Southeast Asia, which was by and large subject to Western colonialism. Lacking historical manufacturing experience, these countries are more dependent on MNCs for their industrial development, with cross-national production networks playing a central role.

The third paradigm is the mosaic that is the People's Republic of China, displaying some of the tendencies of the Northeast Asian and Southeast Asian paradigms. But it also grapples with the legacy of the heavy-industry strategies of state socialism since 1949, which may be obsolete but it continues to play an important welfare role.

Requirements: active class participation and a thirty page research paper. (Woo-Cumings)

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POLSCI 688. Selected Topics in Political Science.

Section 003 — Voter Behavior in the Context of Electoral Institutions.

Instructor(s): Orit Kedar

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/688/003.nsf

The course will discuss voter behavior in the context of electoral institutions. In particular, it will examine the incentives for voters set by electoral systems and regime types and analyze voter behavior in light of the institutional environments in which voters function. The readings will include behavioral, rational, and psychological approaches. The majority of the studies we will read develop a theory and test it using observational data, yet some of the studies rely on experiments, and others are purely theoretical. Most topics will be discussed in the empirical context of OECD countries.

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POLSCI 691. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A directed reading on a topic of the student's choice.

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POLSCI 703. Selected Approaches to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 — Post-Marxism.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is postmarxism? Is it a coherent philosophical-political discourse? Does it constitute a rupture with Marxism or does it represents a project of renewal? How does postmarxism approach and understand the concepts of the political, democracy, sovereignty, the state, representation, power, the people, globalization, and revolution? What are the philosophical presuppositions of postmarxism, especially those related to questions of subjectivity, history, the universal and the particular, necessity and contingency, the demise of absolute foundations, and the fragmentation of the social? Does postmarxism salvage the critical impulse of Marxism or does it signify its abandonment? Finally, how does postmarxism problematize political agency, the decision, the event, strategies of resistance, and communism? The seminar attempts to discuss and answer these questions by establishing a dialogue among postmarxism, neo-Marxism, psychoanalysis, and deconstruction. Selected writings from Jacques Lacan, Louis Althusser, Francois Lyotard, Cornelius Castoriadis, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Michel Foucault, Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, and Antonio Negri.

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POLSCI 793. Methods Seminar.

Methods

Section 001 — Complexity Theory in the Social Sciences. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Robert Axelrod (axe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Complexity theory is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding dynamic processes involving the interaction of many actors. This course focuses on agent-based modeling that is one of the primary methods of analyzing complex adaptive systems. Agent-based modeling involves specifying how individual agents (such as people, nations, or organizations) interact with each other and with their environment. Computer simulation is then used to discover the emergent properties of the model, and thereby gain insights into dynamic processes that would be too difficult to model with standard mathematical techniques.

The course will consider a wide variety of applications of agent-based models to the social sciences, including residential segregation, cultural change, social influence, war, alliances, nation formation, organizational change, elections, and markets. There will be four small exercises, and one major project selected by the student.

The course is intended for graduate students in a wide variety of fields, not just political science. Knowledge of a programming language is required.

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POLSCI 793. Methods Seminar.

Methods

Section 002 — Advanced Modeling. [Credits?]

Instructor(s): Scott Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will cover some advanced topics in game theory and other modeling frameworks as well as analyze specific models and their applications. Students should have taken an introductory game theory course and have an interest in formal modeling. Some of the topics that we will cover will include: learning, stability, location decisions, and coordinations. There will be a general focus on the role of institutions and on how to model them. The applied topics will be determined by the interests of the students in the course.

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POLSCI 814. Time Series Analysis.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Regression analysis or POLSCI 699. ICPSR Summer Program. Graduate standing and Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Autoregressive and moving average components of time series; estimation of univariate time series models using the Box-Jenkins approach; econometric (regression) analysis of time series; analysis of integrated time series, including unit root econometrics and error correction models; recent econometric advances in dealing with nonstationary data, including Bayesian approaches.

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POLSCI 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Comparative

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

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POLSCI 891. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

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POLSCI 891. Directed Research.

Section 301 — Advanced Research Seminar in Comparative Politics.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Anne Widner (jwidner@umich.edu), Orit Kedar

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/polsci/891/301.nsf

Course description This course is for graduate students in comparative politics who have attained candidacy and to others by permission. It provides a forum for presenting and discussing work in progress, including dissertation proposals, research designs, draft chapters, and practice job talks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

POLSCI 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Edie N Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is required for all beginning graduate student instructors. It meets once for an extended period before the term starts and then for additional workshops/meetings during the Fall Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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