College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 6:21 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/womenstd/419/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 422(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory psychology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/442/001.nsf

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 40% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 60% of the grade). Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Readings

  • Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.
  • Hastorf, A. H. and Cantril, H. "They saw a game: A case study." Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1954, 129-134. (CP)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 445 / LING 447. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 240. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/445/001.nsf

This course is designed to familiarize students with experimental research on the cognitive processes that underlie language comprehension and production in normal adults. The focus of the course is on word recognition, syntactic and semantic analysis, and discourse-level processing; language acquisition and speech perception will not be covered. Topics will include lexical and structural ambiguity resolution, models of parsing and sentence understanding, the role of discourse-level information, the planning and production of sentences, and the role of prosody/intonation. This course will be taught at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying linguistics, psychology or cognitive science. It is primarily a lecture course, with two exams. A textbook will be supplemented with relevant journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 458(558). Psychology of Adolescence.

Instructor(s): Tabbye Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 250. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/458/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide an overview of the current state of the art regarding research on adolescent development. Both theory and research as it pertains to normative processes will be considered from both a lifespan and an ecological perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interaction between the individual and contexts which especially impact this developmental group (i.e., school, peer groups, neighborhood).

A survey of some of the specific problems and contemporary issues facing adolescents will be presented within these contexts (i.e., teenage childbearing, substance abuse, eating disorders, delinquency, school adjustment, and depression). In addition, the course will highlight issues of culture and ethnicity in adolescent social development. The class will meet twice a week for a total of three hours of lecture and discussion. There will be class presentations, a term paper and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001 — Meets with Psych 487.003.

Instructor(s): Monique A Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 260. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, discussion) with skill development through participation in group exercises. The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on class participation, group projects, and peer ratings. The course pack that you will be using is from Accu-Copy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 473(573). Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 250 and 270. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 474. Introduction to Behavior Therapy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Randy Scott Roth (randyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 270. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will review the major theoretical models, assessment strategies, and treatment modalities of behavior therapy. The syllabus will initially introduce behavior modification within the context of traditional psychology and review its underlying assumptions. Basic principles of classical and operant conditioning and social learning theory will be described, and the respective paradigms will be extended to explain the mechanisms and remediation of childhood and adult psychopathology including marital and family dysfunction. Recent trends in behavior therapy, including the growth of cognitive schools of behavior change and the application of learning principles in the investigation and treatment of a wide variety of medical disorders, will follow. Finally, a critical evaluation of behavior therapy and relevant ethical concerns will be discussed. Student evaluation will be based on three examinations and a behavior modification project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 488 / SOC 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann

Prerequisites: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 465.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 001 — Hormones & Behavior.

Instructor(s): Oliver C Schultheiss (oschult@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 230. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/531/001.nsf

This course will discuss hormonal influences on human and animal behavior. The relations between hormones, brain, and behavior will be discussed in a variety of species. We will look both at the diversity in nature, as well as at the common threads that govern interactions between hormones and behavior in all animals. Specific topics will include hormonal influences on sexual behavior, courtship behavior, dominance, parental behavior, learning and memory, thirst, feeding, cognitive functions, and stress responses. The course will be taught as a mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations (posters). Grades will be assigned on the basis of two exams, log books written by the students, and poster presentations and critiques.

Textbook: Behavioral Endocrinology, 2nd Edition by Becker, Breedlove, Crews & McCarthy, (Eds.), MIT Press/Bradford Books, Cambridge, MA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 002 — Sleep Neurobiology, Medicine, and Society. Meets with NEUROSCI 520.001.

Instructor(s): Ralph Lydic (rlydic@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 230. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/neurosci/520/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to give students the most up-to-the-date information on the biological, personal, and societal relevance of sleep. Personal relevance is emphasized by the fact that the single best predictor of daytime performance is the quality of the previous night's sleep. The brain actively generates sleep, and the first third of the course will overview the neurobiological basis of sleep cycle control.

Sleep will be used as a vehicle for teaching basic neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological principles. This information will provide a cellular-level understanding of how sleep deprivation, jet lag, and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine alter sleep and wakefulness. It is now clear that sleep significantly alters physiology.

The second third of the course will cover sleep-dependent changes in physiology and sleep disorders medicine. Particular emphasis will be placed on disorders of excessive sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep-dependent changes in autonomic control. Chronic sleep deprivation impairs immune function and may promote obesity. Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4:00 and 6:00 A.M., and the second portion of the class will highlight the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine.

The societal relevance of sleep will be considered in the final portion of the class. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented society, operator-error by one individual can have a disastrous negative impact on public health and safety. Fatigue-related performance decrements are known to have contributed as causal factors in nuclear power plant failures, transportation disasters, and medical errors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 530 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Margaret Shih (mjshih@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 260. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 462.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: PSYCH 280. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 600. Psychology Graduate Proseminar I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher M Peterson (chrispet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing in Psychology or approved joint program. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a graduate-level overview of psychology with special attention to its coverage of: (a) biological; (b) affective/cognitive; (c) developmental; and (d) social/organizational aspects of behavior. It emphasizes the historical context of these approaches and their contemporary incarnations and interconnections at the University of Michigan. The course is designed to help students in the clinical psychology program satisfy the spirit of APA accreditation guidelines for broad and integrative exposure to scientific psychology, but all interested graduate students are welcome to enroll. A self-paced format is used for this credit/no-credit course. Students will do background readings in each of the four areas on focus, and for each area, attend at least three department- or campus-wide lectures of their choice in which current research is presented. The coordinator will arrange for enrolled students to be included on relevant campus e-mail lists announcing talks, but each student is encouraged to draw everyone else's attention to talks not included in these announcements. Upon completion of the relevant readings and attendance at the lectures for an area, each student will write a reaction paper (4-5 double-spaced 12-point font pages in APA format), following this suggested outline:

  1. something old (historical background),
  2. something new (current research examples),
  3. something borrowed (how this area is related to other areas of psychology-taking and/or giving methods and theories), and
  4. something (maize and) blue (Michigan's contribution).

Papers can be given to the coordinator as they are completed, or all at one time, but hard copies only please, and be sure to keep a duplicate! Students will touch base throughout the academic term with the coordinator and one another to discuss progress and concerns, but the explicit expectation is that each student will individually craft and pace the assignments. All reaction papers must be turned in to the coordinator by 5:00 PM on the last day of classes (Wednesday, December 10, 2003).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 613. Advanced Statistical Methods, I.

Section 001 — Meets with Psych 988.002.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One previous course in statistics. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (5). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a two-term course (with PSYCH 614 in the Winter term). PSYCH 613 is a prerequisite for PSYCH 614. Students will gain experience by analyzing data and gain an appreciation for the rationale underlying the standard statistical procedures used in psychological research. The course consists of five hours of lecture; additional review sections will also be available. Topics covered throughout the year include analysis of variance, regression, factor analysis, multidimensional scaling, clustering, and structural equations modeling. Students will also analyze data from their own research projects as well as design studies in their own area of research

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 619. Supervised Research I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Known as the "First Year 619 Research Project." This is an individual instruction course; when enrolling for PSYCH 619, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 643 / EECS 643. Theory of Neural Computation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-4). May not be repeated for credit. CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/643/001.nsf

This graduate course will introduce computational models of information processing in mammalian central nervous system. Topics include models of single neuron, artificial neural network (connectionism), and neural organization and architecture. This term, we will place our emphasis on reinforcement learning algorithms for Markov decision framework that has been a hot topic in machine learning in recent years (temporal difference method, Q-learning, and related algorithms). Students may elect the course for 2-4 credits per arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 654. Classic and Modern Personality Theories.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David G Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/654/001.nsf

In this seminar, we will read and discuss some of the major theories, classic and modern, which have influenced personality psychology. For each theory or theorist, we will read some basic selections and then some modern research articles that draw on (or relate to) that theory. We will be focusing on the following issues, among others:

  1. What explicit or implicit assumptions does the theory make about human nature?
  2. How is the theory related to the other theories?
  3. What are the main elements or concepts that the theory uses to describe normal personality and individual differences?
  4. How could the theory contribute to contemporary personality research (e.g., suggesting new variables or topics of study, new methods, etc.)?
  5. How could contemporary research contribute to the further development of the theory?
.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 665. Measurement and Analysis Problems in Organizational Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of the course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of qualitative, survey, and experimental research in organizations. The emphasis will be on the application of various research design and data collection techniques in actual organizational settings. We will explore the relative strengths of various methods for different research purposes and consider strategies for combining data from different types of research. By the end of the course, students will have developed a plan for the next steps in their own organizational research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 670. Research Design and Evaluation in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher M Peterson (chrispet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers research methods in psychopathology and clinical psychology. It does so on two integrated levels. The first entails a (relatively) abstract examination of general research issues (e.g., design, measurement) and the second a (relatively) concrete examination of specific research strategies (e.g., MEDLINE, structured diagnostic interviews, SPSS/PC).

Course assignments include a series of exercises that should result in a proposal for a research project suitable for the PSYCH 619 (masters) requirement in Clinical Psychology here at the University of Michigan

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 672. Self-Report and MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) Assessment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Randy Scott Roth (randyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Rationale, administration, and interpretation of clinical assessments, behavioral and personality measures including proper administration and scoring of the MMPI and the self-report measures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 673. Clinical Assessment I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ned L Kirsch (nlkirsch@umich.edu) , Roger E Lauer (relauer@umich.edu) , Seth A Warschausky (sethaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first of three courses, each with a lab section, as a group designed to introduce graduate students to clinical inference and concepts of diagnosis. In this first part of the assessment sequence, students are expected to acquire competence in the administration and scoring of adult and child cognitive assessment devices (e.g., WAIS-R, WISC-III, WMS-R), and to obtain an initial practical orientation to the diagnostic interpretation of clients' test results.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 675. Multicultural Issues in Clinical Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donna Kiyo Nagata (nagata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/675/001.nsf

This course examines the influences of ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, and disability in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on the issues related to the assessment and treatment of individuals from African American, Asian American, American Indian, Latino, and multicultural backgrounds.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 676. Clinical Assessment Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolph Clinton Hatfield

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 673. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 678. Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/678/001.nsf

Topics in Clinical Psychology is a two term course designed to introduce first year clinical psychology graduate students to the profession of clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is unique in its attempt to seamlessly blend the values of scientist and practitioner. The content of this course reflects the gravitational pull of these two poles of the field through a series of professional development experiences. Enrollment in this course is limited to first-year clinical psychology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 681. Survey of Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/681/001.nsf

This is a seminar in scientific responsibility for the first year cohort of the social psychology area and joint program students admitted to social psychology. Throughout the three-term sequence issues of professional and scientific behavior will be discussed. A set of focused readings on these topics will be examined during class discussions. Students will be expected to develop and hone their initial curriculum vitae during the course. The fall term consists of an overview of current faculty research projects, an introduction to available scholarly resources, and a general orientation to graduate level research in social psychology. At the end of the first term, students write and orally present an extended abstract of their first year research project (PSYCH 619). During the winter term students discuss their progress on these projects with the cohort and present a more formal version of their PSYCH 619 research. During the third term (fall of the second year), each student will make a more formal presentation of their findings in class, in preparation for their presentation to the social psychology brown bag.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 682 / SOC 682. Advanced Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phoebe C Ellsworth (pce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology and permission of instructor. Priority is given to Ph.D. students in psychology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for graduate students in Social Psychology. Its aim is to provide a survey of Social Psychology, covering a range of topics including attitudes and persuasion, cognitive dissonance, social cognition, the self, emotions, social stigma, gender, and culture. Students are expected to write weekly reaction papers, participate actively in discussions, take their turn leading discussion, and write a term paper. Enrollment is limited. Priority is given to Ph.D. students in psychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 685. Social Psychological Theories.

Section 001 — Prelim Prep.

Instructor(s): Richard E Nisbett (nisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 682; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students who are planning to take the preliminary exam in social psychology during the spring-summer term. It covers the central issues of social psychology based on textbooks and primary sources. Enrollment is limited to students taking the prelim exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 689 / ANTHRCUL 760. Culture and Cognition.

Section 001 — Meets with ANTHRCUL 658.003 and PSYCH 808.006.

Instructor(s): Shinobu Kitayama , Hirschfeld

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 760.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 706. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 711 / SURVMETH 630 / SOC 711. Questionnaire Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Survey Methodology 630.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 719. Supervised Research II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 719, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

PSYCH 745. Psychology of Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rick Lewis (rickl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/745/001.nsf

This course will be a graduate level exploration of major research topics in psycholinguistics, with an emphasis on how the mind/brain comprehends and produces language. The last page of this syllabus has a tentative list of topics.

We have two major goals in the course:

  1. We want to understand the current state-of-the-art in psycholinguistic theory for the topics that we cover. Toward this end, we'll first cover a mix of foundational material and classic seminal work, and then proceed to recent published and unpublished work that defines the edge of the current science. About half of the material will be recent work (though this may vary according to topic).

  2. We want to understand the current state-of-the-art in research methods. This includes traditional psycholinguistic behavioral methods, eye-tracking, etc. but also cognitive neuroscience methods such as ERP and fMRI, and computational modeling techniques. And, cutting across the different technical approaches are cross-linguistic methods: using different linguistic properties of different languages as appropriate to answer to some theoretical question.

    Toward this end, we'll be sure that our reading materials cover a range of methods and empirical results for a range of language types. But we will also include:

    1. Class visits by experts in neuroscience techniques for tutorials and question and answer sessions.

    2. Hands-on demos of the empirical methods and equipment we use in the psycholinguistics labs here at Michigan.

    3. Hands-on demos of some of the latest computational modeling techniques used in sentence comprehension research.

Modern psycholinguistics is multidisciplinary, and I fully expect graduate students from multiple fields to be interested in and benefit from this course. This naturally means that not everyone will have all the relevant background from psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, or computer science and computational linguistics. So we will spend some of the early class sessions covering some foundational material in empirical methods and data analysis, and theoretical linguistics, and do this as needed as the course proceeds. These overviews won't be general introductions to the various fields but will focus on just those aspects that we need to understand for the purposes of our course.

Class time will be a mix of instructor-led presentation and discussion, and student-led presentation and discussion, as well as a few lab visits, demos, and guest tutorials as described above.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 748. Cognition and Perception Preliminary Preparation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David E Meyer (demeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a graduate course that fulfills one of the requirements for doctoral candidacy in the Cognition and Perception Area of the Psychology Department. The objective of the course is to prepare students for successfully passing the Area's preliminary doctoral candidacy examination. Class activities are devoted to reading and discussing a diverse set of important journal articles and book chapters from the Area's examination reading list. The reading list covers a wide range of topics in experimental psychology, cognitive science, and cognitive neuroscience. These topics include sensation, perception, learning, memory, reasoning, judgment, decision-making, intelligence, and creativity. In addition, the course focuses on a variety of formal methodological and theoretical approaches that have been taken to investigate these topics scientifically. Permission of the instructor is required for student enrollment in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 756 / LING 756. The Development of Language and Communication Skills.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan A Gelman (gelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology. Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/756/001.nsf

One of the most remarkable feats of childhood is the child's ability to learn a first language. This course will examine how children accomplish this task. We will focus on a wide range of empirical studies and theoretical analyses examining typical and atypical language development, with special focus on word meanings and syntax. Other topics include infant speech perception, pragmatics, bilingualism, pidgins and creoles, language disorders, and language and thought. The format is a mixture of lecture and discussion. Students will be expected to contribute to class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 757. Socialization of the Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jacquelynne Eccles (jeccles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology or approved joint programs. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/757/001.nsf

This course will focus on the factors that play a role in the social development of the child using a transactional ecological framework. The transactional perspective will permit interpreting the relative importance of what the child brings to the situation, the experience that the environment provides, and how each is affected by the other. The ecological perspective will permit an analysis of the social environment into separate systems that influence the child including the family, school, peer group, ethnic and economic status. Specific topics to be considered include the development of intimate relationships from early parental attachments to later romantic ones, the regulation of behavior from toddler assertiveness to adult conduct disorder, the relation between temperament, parenting practices and later personality, and the development of self-representations including gender and ethnic dimensions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 759. Proseminar in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001 — LANGUAGE ACQUISITION IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE.

Instructor(s): Toni C Antonucci (tca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: The course is intended for first year graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor. Student must register for both Fall and Winter semesters to receive a grade. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course reviews contemporary viewpoints in developmental psychology as well as ethical and methodological issues of particular concern to developmental psychologists. In addition, faculty present and discuss their current research. The course is a two-semester course. Students enroll for 3 credits in the Fall, and 0 credits in the Winter, but receive grades at the end of the Winter. The course is intended for first year graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 760. Problems of Organized Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee , Price, Dutton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved combined programs. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course addresses problems of organized behavior. The course identifies a basic duality of human nature — that we are individual and we are part of groups. We have a life and mind of our own and we are part of the life and mind of the group. This duality appears as a paradox, as two correct by contradictory view of human behavior. One view sees human behavior as individual behavior. This behavior can be combined to comprise groups and organizations. The other view sees human behavior as organizational behavior. This behavior can be analyzed and reduced to a system of roles enacted by individuals. The course focuses on this duality and the paradoxes and problems it poses for understanding and managing human behavior.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 770. Family Therapy.

Section 001 — Family Systems Theory and Therapy.

Instructor(s): Donna Nagata (nagata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Comprehensive introduction to family systems theory and therapy. We will critically review the main tenets of family systems theory, and compare and contrast major models or "schools" of family therapy, including psychodynamic, humanistic, structural, strategic, behavioral, and narrative approaches. Videotaped demonstrations by master therapists are an integral part of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 773 / DOC 831. Research Methods for Evaluating Social Programs and Human Service Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol Mowbray (cmowbray@umich.edu) , Daphna Oyserman (daphna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing, one graduate level statistics course, and a basic understanding of multivariate analysis, including ANOVA and multiple regression/correlation. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/773/001.nsf

How do experimental methods translate into figuring out if an intervention to promote well-being or reduce risk actually worked?

This course focuses on designing and implementing program evaluations. Topics include:

  1. translation of theory into measurement and specification of variables,
  2. experimental and quasi-experimental designs, use of qualitative methods in formative evaluation,
  3. appropriate development of measurement tools that are both stable (reliable) and sensitive to change,
  4. alternative data sources (observational, self-report, archival data including clinical records and management information systems, focus group, key informant),
  5. development of timely and ongoing stakeholder and community involvement in design and implementation of evaluation,
  6. methods to enhance the utilization of evaluation for change and ethical issues.

Special attention will be given to sociocultural context operationally defined following Castillo as the sum total of the knowledge passed from generation to generation within a given society including language, religion, political structure, economic and legal systems, norms of behavior, and ideas about illness and healing. Our focus on sociocultural context includes attention to the interface of interventions and their appropriate assessment with race, gender, and poverty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 775. Comparative Theories I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Hatcher (robhatch@umich.edu) , Shelly Gail-Zeff Schreier (schreier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: This course is a required course for graduate students in Clinical Psychology but is open to all graduate students. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a required course for graduate students in Clinical Psychology but is open to all graduate students. The first half of the course covers the biological basis for several psychological phenomena of interest to clinical psychologists: Emotion, Memory, Attention, Perception, Consciousness, and Mental Illness. Brain mechanisms responsible for these various aspects of behavior (to the extent that they are known) are emphasized. The second half of the course covers the basic concepts of psychoanalytic theory, including the unconscious, conflict, transference and counter transference, object relations, racial/ethnic/cultural issues, and trauma. Major schools and viewpoints are discussed (ego psychology, object relations, self-psychology, relational and interpersonal approaches).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole (nnamdi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: PSYCH 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/779/001.nsf

Practicum Seminar is a two-term course designed to integrate practicum experiences with the academic mission of the clinical psychology program. Clinical work is usually anxiety provoking to a beginning clinician. While some anxiety is a common (and arguably necessary) part of any new experience, too much anxiety on the part of the clinician can easily interfere with the goals of clinical work. For this reason, a substantial portion of the course will be devoted to managing student anxieties and concerns. The balance of the time will be devoted to building bridges between clinical theory and practice by discussing major theories of therapeutic intervention in the context of clinical case material. Enrollment in this course is limited to second-year clinical psychology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 785 / SOC 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Lectures and discussion on the core problems of groups. These include the origins of group living, simple group effects (e.g., social facilitation, social loafing, and imitation), types of social relations, cooperation, social interaction and role differentiation, status differences, group problem solving and decision making, conformity to the majority, minority influence, and inter-group relations. There is a term paper and a take-home final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 794. Seminar in Development, Psychopathology, and Mental Health.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine Lord , Toni C Antonucci

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 001 — Biopsychology Colloquium Proseminar. [2 Credits].

Instructor(s): Stephen A Maren (maren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar course for graduate students in Biopsychology is organized around the ongoing Biopsychology Colloquium Series. It consists of discussion of selected readings relevant to the colloquium presentations, and will cover a wide range of topics in Biopsychology. Students are required to register for 2 credits in the Fall Term and 1 credit in the Winter Term to meet Program requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 002 — Biological Perspectives on Stress and Disease. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Seema Bhatnagar (bhatnags@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/808/002.nsf

The goal of this course is to understand the mechanisms by which stressful stimuli change neural function and alter physiology and behavior. We will examine a number of stress-sensitive systems, with a particular focus on the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. We will examine topics related to the effects of acute and repeated stress exposure on physiological systems and various aspects of behavior through the lifespan. Through student-led discussions, we will discuss readings relevant to each topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 003 — Cognition in the Wild. Meets with Psych 400.001. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Colleen M Seifert

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/400/001.nsf

Increasingly, we are faced with the need to understand human cognition in real-world contexts. Natural settings incorporate individual differences, collaborative teams, cognitive artifacts, and organizational systems that may increase the complexity of cognition in interesting ways. Studying cognition in natural settings requires novel methods to capture and analyze observed behavior. Innovative methods are just beginning to emerge from research programs in psychology, education, sociology, and anthropology. By examining case studies of successful research programs that tackle these issues, we will survey a variety of methods for the study of cognition in complex contexts. The course format involves weekly readings of original journal articles, student-led discussions, and a final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 004 — Building and Testing Structural Equation Models in the Social Sciences. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Amiram Vinokur (avinokur@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover the conceptual and technical issues of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Following the presentation of major conceptual issues, five basic structural models will be described in detail. The models vary from simple to more complex ones. They also cover wide range of situations including longitudinal and mediational analyses, comparisons between groups, and analyses that include data from different sources such as from parents, teachers, supervisors, co-workers. The description and discussion of the models will provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply SEM techniques using EQS software for analyzing, evaluating and reporting results produced by this analytic method. This knowledge is easily transferable to the use of LISREL or AMOS software. The course will also include three sessions in the computer lab to complete five short assignments. Course work will require the students to construct and test a structural model using their own data or data from available data sets and produce a paper reporting their analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 006 — Meets with ANTRHRCUL 760.001/PSYCH 689.001 and ANTHRCUL 658.001. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Shinobu Kitayama , Hirschfeld

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

See Cultural Anthropology 760.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 007 — Autism Seminar. [1-3 credits].

Instructor(s): Catherine Lord

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 808. Special Seminar.

Section 014 — Interdisciplinary Seminar on Analytic Craftsmanship. Credits? Meets with Mechanical Engineering 699.001.

Instructor(s): Richard Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu) , Panos Papalambros

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 817 / STATS 817 / SOC 810 / EDUC 817. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson (jjacksn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, and graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501. (1). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.qmp.isr.umich.edu/disc_series_info.cfm

See Statistics 817.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 819. Supervised Research III.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

PSYCH 861 / EDBEHAVR 800. Proseminar in Education and Psychology.

Section 001 — Meets with EducationC (EDBEHAVR) 800.001.

Instructor(s): Martin L Maehr (mlmaehr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate students only and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Seminar discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psycho-educational assessment. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and work on their first year research projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 877. Psychopathology through the Lifespan I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra A Graham-Bermann (sandragb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This graduate course in clinical psychology presents an introduction to understanding the etiology, the presentation of, and the process of a number of developmental disturbances in childhood. Following the developmental psychopathology model, research on the relevant risk and protective factors associated with these disturbances is presented. The course begins with a review of five theoretical frameworks useful for understanding disturbances of behavior during childhood. For each class session, a didactic presentation of the issue is followed by a clinical case presentation, a film, and/or an invited speaker. Coverage of behavioral disorders includes attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, as well as conduct and oppositional-defiant disorders. Coverage of emotional and social disorders ranges from childhood depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress, to social withdrawal. Developmental and learning disorders reviewed in the course are autism, childhood onset schizophrenia, mental retardation, tic disorders and learning disabilities. Areas of risk for infants and children include disorders of attachment, loss, and family violence. Health-related disturbances are eating disorders and chronic health problems. Finally, the section on resiliency and protective factors explores the features of environments and of the children themselves that serve to ameliorate otherwise deleterious developmental outcomes. Children with a range of disturbances, and from a range of ages (up to age 16), will be represented.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 879. Internship in Clinical Psychology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: PSYCH 779; Graduate standing and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A student is required to complete at least 2000 hours of internship. Typically, a student completes two or three half-time years at one or more of the agencies that are part of the Michigan "Captive" Consortium. The third half-time year is at the student's option; interested students are placed on a space-available basis, only after students doing required internship hours have been placed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 890 / SOC 850 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 850.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 948. Special Seminar in Psychological Processes.

Section 001 — Learning, Thinking, and Problem Solving. [3 credits]. Meets with Education 710.001 and Psych 958.002.

Instructor(s): Priti Shah (priti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in psychology. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/948/001.nsf

See Psychology 958.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 001 — Motivation in the Classroom. [3 credits]. Meets with Ed 709.001.

Instructor(s): Eccles (jeccles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/958/001.nsf

Seminar on various models of achievement motivation including expectancy-value theory, self-efficacy theory, achievement goal theory, and self-determination theory as they apply to school and classroom settings. We also discuss models of self-regulated learning and the role of developmental, gender, and ethnic differences in achievement motivation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 002 — LEARNING, THINKING, AND PROBLEM SOLVING. [3 credits]. Meets with Education 710.001 and PSYCH 948.001.

Instructor(s): Priti R Shah (priti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/psych/948/001.nsf

In this course, we will focus on theoretical and empirical research in cognitive science on learning, thinking, and problem solving and the implications of this research for instructional practice. In particular, this course addresses questions such as:

  • What do we know about the brain, and "lower-level" cognitive processes such as attention and working memory, that might have implications for instruction?
  • When do knowledge and skills transfer to other, novel situations?
  • Can domain-general, higher-order reasoning skills be taught?
  • What are different learning outcomes when people "learn by doing" or learn by "being told."
  • How does a student's knowledge of his or her own mental processes (metacognition) influence learning outcomes?
  • How do individual differences (in intelligence, learning styles, attentional skills, etc.) influence the best methods for instruction, as well as learning outcomes?
  • And, what are the cognitive processes involved in school subjects such as reading, writing, and arithmetic?

The course readings include current and classic theoretical, basic empirical, and applied articles. This is a discussion-oriented seminar, and everyone will be expected to read the articles assigned before the class period and to actively participate in class discussion. Other requirements include brief weekly reaction papers, questions for discussion, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 958. Special Seminar in Personality and Development.

Section 004 — DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND MENTAL HEALTH Integrated Seminar. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Toni Antonucci (tca@umich.edu) , Catherine Lord

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Developmental approaches to the study of mental health and psychopathology are presented in a social ecological framework. Multicausal models of individual, peer, parent-child, family and sociocultural influences are used to understand individual patterns of behavioral adaptation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 978. Special Seminar in Clinical Psychology.

Section 002 — Psychopharmacology. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Karen K Milner

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 — Evolutionary Psychology: State of the Field. [2-3 credits].

Instructor(s): Barbara Boardman Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu) , Randolph Nesse (nesse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An evolutionary approach has revolutionized the study of animal behavior and can potentially provide a coherent foundation that unifies diverse psychological approaches to understanding human behavior. This seminar will highlight important examples of rapid progress in this field. Roughly half of our meetings will involve discussion with world experts who approach critical questions in several major areas of psychology from an evolutionary perspective. These scientists will present their work in a colloquium series sponsored by the Evolution and Human Adaptation Program that meets on Thursdays from 2:30-4. In preparation for the discussion, students will attend the colloquium and read work by the speaker. Other seminar sessions will include in-depth analyses of particular areas in which an evolutionary approach has proved especially fruitful; for these sessions, we will assign two or more articles. Some of these sessions will involve visitors from University of Michigan faculty discussing their research programs. Topics to be covered include evolutionary perspectives on stress and coping; attachment; parental behavior; sex differences; social relationships; and social cognition. For students signed up for 2 credits, requirements include regular attendance at the Thursday afternoon Colloquium Series as well as the seminar meetings. Students taking the class for 3 credits will also complete 10-15 page paper. This paper can be a research proposal for empirical investigation of a problem in evolution and psychology or a critical assessment of current research in a particular problem area. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 — [5 credits]. Meets with Psych 613.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 613.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

PSYCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

PSYCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for PSYCH.


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