College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 6:32 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will ask two central questions about gender relations — Why is there gender inequality? and What are women's experiences of that inequality? We will examine many (often contradictory) answers to these questions. The course will be broken into four sections — the State; Work; Family; and Body/Sexuality — that represent the main areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression. We will look for answers to a wide range of questions that will shed light on our basic question about how gender inequality is constructed and maintained. Some specific questions we will ask are: How do women and men decide who does the housework? Why do MacDonalds' workers think cooking is a man's job? Is mothering political? Is breastfeeding? When is rape a war crime? How do race, class, and sexuality interact with gender? Do cosmetics, shaving, and dieting maintain gender inequality?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 452. Law and Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Law and social psychology intersect around issues of norms and justice, and this will be a focus of this course. We shall examine the concepts of norms, responsibility, and justice in both a social psychological and legal context and will look at how findings from social psychology, which is a science, bear on issues that arise in the law, a normative system of social control. We will look at legal processes in general and will consider the roles of different actors in legal systems: civil parties; criminal victims; lawyers; judges; and juries. Focus will be given to the central process of legal systems: the trial; jury selection; eyewitness testimony; the presentation of evidence; jury deliberations; and so on.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001 — Labor and Global Social Change.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/460/001.nsf

Economic globalization is one of the most powerful drivers of social change in the contemporary world. This course asks what economic globalization is, why it takes the form that it does, and how it affects the lives and livelihoods of the more vulnerable working people in the bottom half of the income distributions of the poor countries of the global South and the rich countries of the global North. We survey the range of economic realities faced by the men, women and children who labor for their income in these locations within their economies. We consider the structural changes in those realities that have occurred over the last quarter century, and the causes of those changes. We consider the kinds of reforms to the existing, neoliberal model of global economic regulation demanded by workers' organizations and their allies, and debates over the likely consequences of these changes. Finally, we consider whether (and if so, how) the U.S. labor movement and its allies can increase their political power enough to make the U.S. government an active contributor to the global economic regulation reforms favored by organized labor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 465 / PSYCH 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann

Prerequisites: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although all human groups define some actions and those who engage in them as "deviant", exactly what and who constitutes deviance varies socially, historically and cross-culturally. This course is an introductory sociological analysis of behaviors and identities morally condemned in American society. Special emphasis is directed to the relationship between values, institutions, activities, and identities seen as "deviant" and those thought "conventional." Among the topics explored are the social construction of deviance designations; the relationship of definitions of deviance to social spheres of power; types and processes of social control; the development and management of deviant identities; deviant subcultures; the legislation of morality; the medicalization of deviance; and the patterning of deviance with respect to gender, race, and class. Various theoretical perspectives are examined in the context of such specific areas as sexual practices, mental disorder, gender and sexual identities, drugs and drinking, prostitution, sexual violence, homosexuality, transgenderism, and the deviance of so-called "respectable" individuals and institutions of society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/475/001.nsf

This introductory course on Medical Sociology examines the underpinning concepts of health and illness within a social context, as well as pertinent health care issues in today's society. The objective of this course is to provide students with a central framework of sociological theories, perspectives, methods, terminology, and historical overviews in order to conduct sociological analyses and research on health care issues and medical practices. Topics will include the socio-historical perspective of medicine, epidemiology, the intersection of sociological variables (gender, race, class, and age) with medical issues, social stress, health and illness behavior, healing options, doctor-patient relationships, the role of nurses, physician assistants, and midwives, hospitals and health care delivery systems, health maintenance organizations, as well as the medicalization of America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 — Detroit: Its History and Future. Meets 10/28-11/6 with field trip on Sat. 11/1/03. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=October 29).

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~socdept/courses/soc495/

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there — a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit — the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

This section will meet on Tuesday afternoon, October 28th and Thursday afternoon, October 30th at 4 PM in 3416 Mason Hall. Saturday November 1st will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday — November 4 and Thursday — November 6– afternoons.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.

Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)

The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15.16.

One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for about $ 14.40.

Chapters will be assigned from the several books listed and that these will be available from the University Library's on-line reserve system.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

To obtain credit for this course, it will be necessary to attend every one of the four class meetings and the all-Saturday tour of Detroit.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 500. Orientation Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in the doctoral program of the Sociology Department. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 501. Proseminar on Detroit Area Study Topic.

Section 001 — Rise of Network Society.

Instructor(s): W Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing with intent to elect SOC 512 in winter term. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/501/001.nsf

Description: The Department of Sociology and the Institute for Social Research offer the nation's most comprehensive training in the design of a sample social science survey, questionnaire development, sampling, interviewing and data analysis in the three-course Detroit Area Study sequence. This is a unique and exceptionally valuable training opportunity for students in the social sciences. Participants are encouraged to enroll for the entire three course sequences — SOC 501, 512 and 513 — but may receive credit for one or two courses in the sequence. In particular, undergraduates and students in masters degree programs are encouraged to enroll in the two courses taught in the 2003-04 University Year: SOC 501 and 513.

Detroit once symbolized the challenges of Rust Belt metropolises: urban underclass neighborhoods, vacant factories, empty skyscrapers downtown along with extreme racial, economic class and city-suburban segregation. While there are still many unattractive areas within Detroit and numerous challenges for urban planners, there are also obvious signs of social and economic revitalization. Two new stadia and four rebuilt theaters attract sports fans and patrons of the arts to downtown while two new museums in the Cultural Center area attract parents and their children. In a major swatch of Detroit stretching along the riverfront from the city's border with Grosse Pointe Park to downtown and extending along Woodward from Campus Martius to the Highland Park border; new condos are being built and older buildings converted into lofts.

Despite these changes, metropolitan Detroit remains riven by race and economic status. To a large degree, an overwhelming white and generally prosperous suburban ring surrounds a largely African-American and much poorer central city. The Detroit Area Study in 2003-04 will investigate who benefits from revitalization and whether this revitalization reduces or exacerbates black-white, economic class and city-suburban differences.

The survey to be conducted in the spring and summer of 2004 will obtain information from approximately randomly selected 750 African American and 750 white adults in the three-county metropolitan area. A variety of questions about neighborhood issues and racial attitudes will be asked. In an important innovation, laptops will be used in the interviewing. Respondents will be shown film clips of various neighborhoods that will vary in their amenities and their racial composition. We will carefully and precisely measure how the economic status of a neighborhood and its racial composition influence the evaluations that whites and African-Americans to residential areas.

Sociology 501 is a one-credit seminar that will meet once a week. Students will read about and discuss the history of Detroit, urban issues in the United States, and racial issues in the United States with an emphasis upon the causes and consequences of the racial residential segregation that so thoroughly separates blacks from whites in metropolitan Detroit and similar large locations throughout the nation.

For additional information, please contact Ren Farley at renf@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 503. Race and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar we will examine different patterns of race and ethnic relations from a historical and comparative perspective. We examine how the belief in racial superiority evolved over time and in different places: the U.S. South, Brazil, Nazi Germany. In so doing, we also examine slavery, the plantation society, genocide, as well as the Indian caste system. The experience of the racial minorities is contrasted with that of the voluntary immigrants. We also seek to asses the impact of the Civil Rights Movement on contemporary outcomes in America and to examine contemporary problems, such as those of the persistent poverty of the underclass and segregation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

SOC 505. Theories and Practices of Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu) , John Lie (johnlie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SOC 505 is the first term of a year-long course surveying the theories and practices of sociology. During this academic term, we trace the lineaments and genealogies of major approaches including utilitarianism, Marxism and neo-Marxism, cultural structuralism, post-structuralism, and Weberian and Freudian perspectives. We also explore various attempts by theorists to integrate these approaches. The course remains deliberately open-ended; we seek to convey a sense of what "doing theory" is all about, rather than envisioning a final theoretical or practical resolution.

The course includes both short orienting lectures, seminar-style class discussions and student presentations of supplementary recommended readings. Students will also be required to write three short papers.

This course is required of graduate students in Sociology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 507. Logics and Strategies of Sociological Research Inquiry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jason D Owen-Smith (jdos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in sociology, other graduate students with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/507/001.nsf

This is a graduate–level course in the methods of sociological inquiry, analyzing the logics, strengths, and limitations of the various methods sociologists use. The course, which is required of first–year graduate students in Sociology, reviews both philosophical rationales and their concrete application across the rich and diverse topographies of the discipline. It is intended to provide broad exposure to research methodologies and to prepare students for further graduate work, including the required research practicum and courses in statistics.

Sociology 507 is open only to Sociology graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 510. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/510/001.nsf

This course is the first of a two–term sequence required of all sociology department graduate students. It consists of two weekly class sessions plus a lab–discussion. In the first academic term we cover basic concepts of probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and statistical inference. The lab sessions will be used to discuss problems encountered in the lectures and written assignments and to develop statistical computing skills. The course assumes no prior knowledge of statistics and no mathematical knowledge beyond high school algebra. Requirements include problem sets (i.e., homework), a brief (2-3 page) paper (described in a separate handout), a term project (to be described in class), and midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 513. Practicum in Survey Research.

Section 001 — DAS Sem: Understanding the Root Cause of Environmental Concern Domestically & Environmentally. Meets with NRE 501.042 and SURVMETH 673.001.

Instructor(s): Wayne E Baker (wayneb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/513/001.nsf

This course is the 3rd in the series of courses comprising the Detroit Area Study research practicum. The course has three main components: 1) a series of lectures on issues of survey data analysis, 2) a set of readings targeted to lecture topics, and 3) individual student preparation of a research report that addresses a significant sociological research question using these data. Lectures and readings will focus on most of the following issues: data cleaning & file preparation; classification systems & recodes; descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing; sums of squares and the analysis of variance; data reduction through factor and/or cluster analysis & the development of indices; cross–classification of categoric data & the measurement of association; multivariate linear regression tools; dummy-variable regression & multiple classification analysis; the logic of causal analysis & multiple dependent variables; multiple indicators, measurement errors & statistical analysis; report writing, graphics & the presentation of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 522. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the first of a two-part sequence that introduces students to qualitative research (primarily participant observation and in-depth interviewing) through a variety of activities. Students should begin thinking about possible research projects even before coming to the course, as we will get projects underway relatively quickly. In this semester (522) we focus on being "in the field," that is, on the collection of data. Next semester (523) we will primarily be engaged in analyzing and presenting the data for others. In this course we will learn from reading others' accounts of fieldwork and "how-to" books on qualitative work, but primarily we will learn from doing qualitative research and talking to each other about what we do. The "doing" of qualitative research in the course will consist of two types — 1) exercises in how to collect data and 2) conducting your own original research project. We will talk with each other about our findings, problems, issues, topics, substance, and all other research dilemmas in a variety of ways — in large group discussion in class, in small structured and unstructured group discussions in and out of class, with the instructor individually, and through written feedback that you give to each other and from the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 523. Practicum in Qualitative Research Methods II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/523/001.nsf

This course is the second of the two-term qualitative research practicum that introduces students to qualitative research (primarily participant observation and in-depth interviewing) through a variety of activities. In this academic term we will primarily be engaged in analyzing and presenting the data for others. As in 522, we will learn from reading others' accounts of qualitative data analysis and "how-to" books on qualitative work, but primarily we will learn from doing qualitative research and talking to each other about what we do. We will talk with each other about our findings, problems, issues, topics, substance, and all other research dilemmas in a variety of ways, in large group discussion in class, in small structured and unstructured group discussions in and out of class. Students will produce a final professional research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor required.

SOC 530. Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Axinn (baxinn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of SOC 530, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a graduate-level survey of population studies. An overview of the content is given in the course outline below. The primary emphasis is on demographic behavior as a dependent variable. In addition to examining substantive issues, considerable emphasis is given to basic demographic concepts and measurement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 575. Sociology of Health and Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the social aspects of health, aging and the health care system. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health care professions, health and health care among women and the poor, and the current health care crises in the U.S. and cross-national contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 001 — Population Health.

Instructor(s): James S House (jimhouse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/soc/595/001.nsf

This course seeks to provide an overview and understanding of the nature and determinants, both psychosocial and biomedical, of the health of human populations, and of ways in which population health may be improved by the translation of scientific knowledge into intervention and policy.

The course will meet for two hours each week. The first half or so will be devoted to more didactic presentations and question and answer regarding the topic and readings for the week. The second hour will be devoted to discussion of major issues raised by the readings and general topic for that week. I will coordinate the overall course and some classes, but will be assisted most weeks by another faculty member with greater expertise in the topic for a given week.

The course is open to postdoctoral fellows and advanced (i.e., beyond first year) graduate students by permission of the instructor only. Graduate students may take the course for 2 or 3 credits, with 2 credits requiring only a series of short papers, 3 credits also requiring either a term paper or several medium length papers over the course of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 002 — Ideology, Culture, and Power.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine several seminal debates in the study of ideology, culture, and power, with special attention to possibilities for linking theoretical questions to social research. Readings will likely include works by Marx, Mannheim, Gramsci, Althusser, Bourdieu, Foucault, James Scott, David Laitin, Burawoy & Lukács, Laclau & Mouffe, Jean & John Comaroff, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 003 — Frontier Topics in Soc. Movmnt

Instructor(s): Zald

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 595. Special Courses.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Jayati Lal (jlal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some background in social psychology is desirable; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/womenstd/698/003.nsf

See Women's Studies 698.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 605. Seminar in Sociological Theory.

Section 001 — RETHINKING MARX: Class, Race, Gender, and Modernity.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A rereading of Marx as a theorist of modernity, subjectivity and identity with specific application to the issue of class, race and gender. The course will stress the continuities (rather than the discontinuities) of Marx with Weber and Foucault and attempt to integrate cultural and material approaches. The class will read selections from such classic works as The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts, The German Ideology, Manifesto, Capital, On the Jewish Question, Hegel's Philosophy of Right and the Grundrisse and secondary works on Marx as a theorist of capitalist modernity, and then apply this theory to the problem of class, race and gender. The first half of the course will focus on theory; the second half, on the issues of class, gender, and race. Readings include Derek Sayer Capitalism and Modernity, Moishe Postone, Time, Labor and Social Domination, Jessica Benjamin Bonds of Love, Wendy Brown, States of Injury, Paul Gilroy Against Race, and Etienne Balibar and Immanuel Wallerstein Race, Nation, Class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor required.

SOC 651 / POLSCI 685. Proseminar in Electoral Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 865.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 682 / PSYCH 682. Advanced Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phoebe C Ellsworth (pce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in sociology and permission of instructor. Priority is given to Ph.D. students in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 682.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 695. Directed Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice. An individual instructor must agree to direct such research, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

SOC 696. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 711 / SURVMETH 630 / PSYCH 711. Questionnaire Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Survey Methodology 630.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 717 / STATS 580 / SURVMETH 617 / BIOSTAT 617. Methods and Theory of Sample Design.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three or more courses in statistics and preferably a course in methods of survey sampling. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/survmeth/617/001.nsf

See Statistics 580.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 785 / PSYCH 785. Group Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 785.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 810 / STATS 817 / PSYCH 817 / EDUC 817. Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Social Science Methodology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John E Jackson (jjacksn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, and graduate-level course in STATS at the level of STAT 500 and 501. (1). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.qmp.isr.umich.edu/disc_series_info.cfm

See Statistics 817.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 815. Research Seminar in Economic Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This research seminar is designed to provide graduate students with experience in constructing, presenting, reviewing, and criticizing articles in economic sociology and the sociology of organizations. Each week a student, faculty member, or invited outside speaker will circulate a manuscript and present the paper in the colloquium format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 825 / HISTORY 825 / ANTHRCUL 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or HISTORY 351 or POLSCI 355. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

SOC 830. Research Seminar in Social Demography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Population Background. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is offered every term. Students in the Social Demography Program are expected to attend it continuously when in residence for 1-3 credits per term. Its objectives are to socialize students to be professional researchers and help students write research papers. It consists of the PSC Brownbag Seminar, the Student Research Forum, and group and individualized meetings with the instructor. Although students are enrolled for only 1 or 2 credits most of the time, they are required to register for full (3) credits at least once, in the term they complete and present a research paper. It is expected that students who use SOC 830 to fulfill their research seminar requirement in the Department of Sociology be enrolled in SOC 830 for at least two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

SOC 850 / PSYCH 890 / EPID 850. Psychosocial Factors in Mental Health I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Williams (wildavid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Selected advanced topics including problems of diagnosing psychopathology through community surveys, psychosocial predictors of mental illness, primary prevention and coping with undesirable life events. This seminar brings together a multidisciplinary set of faculty and students from sociology, psychology, health behavior and health education, psychiatry, and epidemiology to present and discuss recent research on the social and psychological sources of mental and physical health. Substantively, the seminar will focus on the role of psychosocial and social structural factors in the etiology and course of health and illness, including the study of life events, chronic role strains, resources for adapting to potential stressors, and the actual process of coping and adaptation. The application of social epidemiology to problems of service utilization may also be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 001 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China. [3 credits]. Meets with CCS 501.001 and ASIAN 500.001.

Instructor(s): James Lee (jql@umich.edu) , Albert Park (alpark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Chinese Studies 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 895. Special Seminars.

Section 002 — Topic? Credits?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 — Evolutionary Psychology: State of the Field. [2-3 credits].

Instructor(s): Barbara Boardman Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu), Randolph Nesse (nesse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 988.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 988 / PSYCH 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 — [5 credits]. Meets with Psych 613.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-5; 1, 3 or 5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 613.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

SOC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


Undergraduate Course Listings for SOC.


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