College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 6:24 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


SPANISH 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Detailed analysis of specific syntactic problems such as theory of the tenses of the verb, the subjunctive mood, structure of simple and compound sentences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 413 / ROMLING 413 / EDCURINS 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego De Blibeche (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 414 / ROMLING 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven N Dworkin (dworkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard, and an overview of the linguistic situation in modern Spain. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 430. Advanced Studies in Hispanic Culture and Society.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Queer Culture of the Hispanic Caribbean and its Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Lawrence LaFountain-Stokes

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. For Grad credit, must do regular course work which is assigned, as well as write a 20 page research paper.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/430/001.nsf

This course is an exploration of select cultural texts (film, literature, essay, performance, cartoons) from the insular Hispanic Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico) and its U.S. Diaspora that present issues of lesbianism, homosexuality, bisexuality, transvestism, and transgender identities and practices. The course will seek to use social science research (especially on sexuality and migration) to understand varied cultural productions. Some of the main issues explored will be:

  • How do Hispanic Caribbean paradigms of sexuality differ from those dominant in the U.S.?
  • What is the role and effect of migration on sexual expression?
  • How does homophobia manifest itself in Hispanic Caribbean communities?
  • What has been the impact of the Cuban Revolution on the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer community?
  • How do gender, class, and race affect this framework?
  • How has activism affected this situation?
  • How are these issues explored in cultural productions?
  • What aesthetic strategies do artists employ in their representations of this issue?

Readings (and films) will include works by Reinaldo Arenas, Rane Arroyo, Junot Díaz, Magali García Ramis, Erika. Lopez, Ian Lumsden, Frances Negrón-Muntaner, Achy Obejas, Juanita Ramos, Manuel Ramos Otero, Sonia Rivera-Valdés, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Mayra Santos-Febres, Carmelita Tropicana, Luz Maria Umpierre, and Judd Winick. This course will have a required weekly film screening in addition to regular class meetings. Course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

SPANISH 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Spain from the Margins.

Instructor(s): Cristina Moreiras-Menor (moreiras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the regional literatures of Spain in order to analyze the tensions underlying the construction of a National literary canon. We will focus on the production of Catalan, Basque, Galician and other peripheral traditions to reflect upon topics such as nationalism, Spanishness, cultural identities, language and nation, the migrant subject, transculturation, hybridity, among others. Based on historical and cultural readings we will trace a cultural history of each Region. Readings will include Rosalía de Castro, Ramón del Valle-Inclán, Mercé Rododera, Manuel Rivas, Suso de Toro, Juan Marsé, Bernardo Atxaga, Xosé Luis Méndez Ferrín, among others. The class will include Spanish films dealing with this topics. Readings in Spanish translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 459. Don Quijote.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Don Quijote y la formación de la novela moderna

I. Objetivos del curso

El presente seminario estudiará este texto canónico desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando en su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adaptan a la sensibilidad moderna. Se prestará atención a aspectos tales como la naturaleza del texto, su consideración narratológica como lectura frente al género popular y auditivo del teatro, y su lugar dentro de la escena cultural de su momento. Simultáneamente, se analizarán aspectos estrictamente literarios como la coherencia textual, personajes y marginalidad, espacios urbanos y rurales, sexualidad latente o abierta, violencia y cuerpo, paradigmas de subversión ideológica, subtradiciones literarias en juego o espacios míticos y simbólicos. La clase y lecturas asignadas serán en español.

II. Requisitos

Los textos asignados en clase deberán ser leídos en su totalidad. La base pedagógica del curso se estructura a partir de un "close reading" de la obra. Como complemento, se leerán las correspondientes lecturas críticas así como la bibliografía adicional recomendada por el profesor, ya sean pertenecientes a los textos o al contexto en que se generaron. El estudiante deberá realizar una presentación oral en clase sobre el fragmento del texto que más le interese. Un examen parcial y un examen final (para la segunda mitad del curso solamente) completarán la nota global.

III. Criterios de evaluación

La evaluación final estará basada en la nota la presentación (15%), los dos exámenes (25% cada uno) y la preparación y participación en clase (35%). Sólo se admiten ausencias por enfermedad (con nota médica) o festividad religiosa.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 460. The Spanish Comedia.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank P Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course deals with the national drama of Spain in the 17th century. Its plays vary from historical narratives to social comedies. As Spain moved into the early modern period, its dramatists sought to depict their society and found it wavering between old ideals, strict social and moral codes and a desire to break away from these restrictions. The course will highlight these contradictions and will attempt to reveal the social, economic and political fault lines that were soon to bring down the Spanish Empire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 472. Pre-Columbian Societies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Indigenous Peoples of the Americas: What we know about them and how we represent them.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276 and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/472/001.nsf

This course will focus on Ancient civilizations in the Americas and how we perceive them today. One of its purposes is to give students an idea of the vast variety of indigenous cultures in pre-Columbian times, how much we know about some of them but, most of all, how much we ignore. Special attention will be paid to their subsistence patterns and social organizational principles. Another goal of this course is to analyze the ways in which we, from a Western vantage point, portray indigenous cultures. Michael D. Coe gives us the chance to focus on a study of Maya culture before the arrival of the Spaniards. It provides us, too, with a challenging example of the pros and cons of ethnohistorical and archaeological reconstruction. We will read Steve Stern's book on a region of the former Inca Empire, Huamanga, in order to learn about the relationship between the Inca rulers and their subjects. The book also deals with the different ways in which indigenous peoples from the Andes adapted to the changes provoked by European colonization. A book compiled by Pauketat and Emerson will contain information about the cultures that populated the Valleys of the Rivers Ohio and Mississippi in prehistoric times. In order to see how nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers view indigenous cultures, we will read a couple of novels: The Last of the Mohicans, by J. Fenimore Cooper, and People of the River, by W. M. Gear and K. OUNeal. We are also going to watch a few movies that represent indigenous subjects and cultures, such as Hollywood Westerns and a couple of ethnographic films, as well as fragments from Pocahontas, 1492, and others. At the end of the course we will pass the mike to the indigenous subjects themselves and will try to listen to what they have to say. The two books that will close the course are Shadows of Tender Fury, by Subcomandante Marcos (about the Chiapas, Mexico, insurgent indigenous movement) and Peace, Power and Righteousness. An Indigenous Manifesto, by Taiaiake Alfred.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 473. Colonial/Postcolonial Studies in Latin-American Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/spanish/473/001.nsf

One of the goals of this course is to explore the limitations of Postcolonial theory as a tool to understand or make sense of Latin American culture and society. We will read authors like Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Ngugi Wa Thiongo, Aimé Césaire and many other Postcolonial critics. Most of these authors elaborated their theoretical apparatuses from the perspective of subjects who had broken the colonial ties to empires such as the British and French ones. At the same time, we will read some canonical Latin American literary works and will watch some Latin American films in order to test the explanatory power of the aforementioned Postcolonial critics. Parallel to these readings we will study some Latin American critics such as Hugo Achugar, Angel Rama and Néstor García Canclini, whose theoretical frameworks are originated in the framework of decolonization that Latin American independent republics have been developing for the last 175 years, in order to see how their approaches differ from the ones practiced by Postcolonial authors. Through the comparison of these different types of texts we will be able to assess the explanatory power of Postcolonial theory as well as its limitations for the study of Latin America. We will also be able to evaluate the methods and theories generated by Latin Americanists, not only from Latin America, but also from the U.S. academic world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 475. Latin-American Narrative.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Slavery, Freedom and "Mulataje": Representations of the African Diaspora in XIX Latin America.

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did slavery as an institution became a subject of representation? How did slaves and its descendants negotiate their access to literature, art and culture in slave societies? This course is a survey of the representations of Africans, and African descendants in nineteenth-century Latin America. From a first view of the Haitian Revolution and the ways the dialectics of master and slave were built in the turn of the century, we will analyze the struggles to construct an ethic of freedom for blacks and mulattoes in Latin America. From this point of view we will focus on slave narratives' such as Cuban Juan Francisco Manzano's Autobiografía de un esclavo (1841) and novels about mulato (a) characters, such as Cirilo Villaverde's Cecilia Valdés, Aluízio de Azevedo's O Mulato (El mulato) and Bernardo de Guimarães A Escrava Isaura (La esclava Isaura). We will locate many of these novels in the race, class and social clashes between blacks, mulattoes and whites in these societies. From here we will define the complexity of notions such as: mestizaje, colonization, freedom, and culture, and its many crosses with representations of race, gender and sexuality. Along with literary texts and documentaries, we will discuss historical, sociological views of the XIX century written by contemporary sociologists and historians. Two papers 5-6 pages, final paper (10 pages), Seminar will be conducted in Spanish, Brazilian texts will be given in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 476. Latin-American Poetry.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Poesía mexicana del siglo XX.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Conducted in Spanish. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Los tres objetivos principales de este curso son 1) presentar a los estudiantes un panorama general de la poesía mexicana del siglo veinte, 2) enseñarles algunas nociones básicas de retórica, poética y métrica, así como de la literatura, la cultura y la historia en general que les serán útiles para mejor comprender y apreciar esta poesía y 3) estudiar detalladamente cómo y bajo qué circunstancias escribieron su poema favorito algunos de los poetas mexicanos contemporáneos más conocidos. Dedicaremos las primeras semanas al estudio de cómo y porqué se escribieron algunos de los poemas más famosos de los últimos cuarenta años y posteriormente leeremos detenidamente algunos de los mejores poemas mexicanos escritos entre 1916 y 1966. Los libros requeridos para el curso son _Poesía en movimiento: México, 1915-1966_ (Octavio Paz, et a) y _El poeta en un poema_ (Marco Antonio Campos). Estos libros estarán a la venta en Schoenhof's Foreign Books probablemente dos o tres semanas antes del inicio de las clases. La página web de esta librería es "http://www.schoenhofs.com."

Los aspectos que se enfatizarán más en este curso serán el conocimiento y la comprensión de los textos leídos y la partipación en clase. La nota final estará basada en tres exámenes (25 % cada uno) y en la participación en y la asistencia puntual a clase (25%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — The Novel of the Mexican Revolution.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Mexican Revolution was the defining event in modern Mexican history. It also shaped the course of Mexican literature throughout the twentieth century. In this course, we will read some of the most important and influential novels dealing with the revolution and its place in modern Mexican cultural history.

Readings:

Mariano Azuela. Los de abajo.
Nellie Campobello. Cartucho.
Juan Rulfo. Pedro Páramo.
Carlos Fuentes. La muerte de Artemio Cruz.
Elena Garro. Recuerdos del porvenir.
Jorge Ibargüengoitia. Los relámpagos de agosto.
Gilbert M. Joseph & Timothy J. Henderson, Eds. The Mexico Reader: History, Culture, Politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Manuel Puig's Movie House.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why is Manuel Puig so fascinated by films such as "Blood and Sand" or "The Great Waltz"? Why do Puig's writings use the iconography of Hollywood to represent Latin American societies? Is Puig really a novelist or a movie script writer? To answer these questions, this course examines Puig's "movie house" as the point of departure for his fictions and as the place for his literary and cinematic inventions.

Selected Readings

  • Manuel Puig. La traición de Rita Hayworth
  • ---. Materiales iniciales (compiled by Amícola)
  • ---. El beso de la mujer araña
  • ---. Pubis angelical
  • ---. Cae la noche tropical
  • ---. The Buenos Aires Affair
  • Levine, Suzanne J. Manuel Puig and the Spider Woman.
  • Campos, René. La textura cinemática de Manuel Puig.
  • Kerr, Lucille. Suspended Fictions.

Selected Films:

  • "Blood and Sand"
  • "The Great Waltz"
  • "Cat People"
  • "In Old Chicago"
  • "Weekend in Havana"

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 528 / ROMLING 528 / FRENCH 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/romling/528/001.nsf

See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 635. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

SPANISH 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 — Mestizaje & National Identity. Meets with LACS 619.001.

Instructor(s): Javier C Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu) , Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/lacs/619/001.nsf

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 699.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 870. Seminar in Hispanic Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Section 001 — Languages & Technologies.

Instructor(s): Arroyo

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 873. Seminar in the Modern Spanish Novel.

Section 002 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Highfill

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SPANISH 881. Current Issues in Literary Theory and Criticism.

Section 001 — Biopolitics and Bare Life in Latin America: Literature, Accumulation, Obsolescence.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and two 600-level literature courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Greeks had two words for "life": bios, which refers to ordered, organized, normative life; and zoe, which refers to the simple fact of living common to all beings (Agamben). Modern biopolitics, then, refers to capitalism's ability to insert docile and disciplined bodies into its mechanisms and calculations of power and accumulation. It is therefore intimately related to notions such as production, the State, the nation, identity, hegemony, capital, and culture. Regimes of calculation and rationalization also imply varying degrees of exclusion, abjection, surplus population, or obsolescence. Within such dynamics bare life (understood simply as the horizon of the non-biopolitical) refers to a possible point of suspension or interruption in the logics and calculations of the biopolitical realm; in other words, a thinking of the limits of biopolitical rationalization. There can be little doubt that the modern Latin American literary tradition has been largely biopolitical in its representational and critical deployments. The question for us now, however, is whether there is room for bare life in the Latin American literary tradition; that is, whether one can uncover a non-biopolitical horizon in reflection's relation to modern Latin American literary history, reason, and culture.

Primary readings by Sarmiento, da Cunha, Mariátegui, Campobello, Rulfo, Roa Bastos, García Márquez, Arguedas, Puig, Eltit, Gutiérrez, Lemebel, Padilla.

Theoretical readings by Aristotle, Agamben, Marx, Foucault, Gramsci, Derrida.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 895. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

SPANISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

SPANISH 993 / ROMLING 993 / FRENCH 993 / ITALIAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 993.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SPANISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a Doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for SPANISH.


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