College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Women's Studies


This page was created at 6:26 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


WOMENSTD 416 / ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487. Women in Victorian England.

Gender, Culture, and Representation

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/english/416/001.nsf

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Department

WOMENSTD 419 / PSYCH 411. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Gender and Ethnicity in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ami Robinson (kofi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Ethnicity in the U.S.).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/womenstd/419/001.nsf

WOMENSTD 419 provides an introduction to theories of group dynamics that illuminate stages of group development and productivity. The course will combine a theoretical presentation with an experiential learning model, including teaching and practice of group facilitation skills. Special attention will be given throughout the course to the influence and manifestation of gender, class, national origin, and ethnic and race dynamics, as they shape events, conflict, and communication in various group formats. This course provides preparation for WOMENSTD 420 Group Facilitation in Women's Studies through which students gain experience in peer facilitation in WOMENSTD 100 Women's Issues.

Note: This is the prerequisite course to WOMENSTD 420 Group Facilitation in Women's Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

WOMENSTD 420. Group Facilitation in Women's Studies.

Practice Course

Instructor(s): Jane A Hassinger, Julie A Eastin

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 419 and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Practice Course).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students study interpersonal and small group dynamics in general, and as these vary with group composition. The prerequisite course, (WOMENSTD 419, Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context), provides the theoretical basis for this course. Students apply knowledge and expertise gained in WOMENSTD 419 by facilitating small groups (8-10 people).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

WOMENSTD 443 / CAAS 443. Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health.

Gender and Health

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nesha Z Haniff

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 240 or CAAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Explores the intersections of health, gender, and race by focusing on the epidemic of HIV and the epidemic of violence in the African American community. Students explore the theory and practice surrounding an intervention module on HIV presentation and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

WOMENSTD 447 / SOC 447. Sociology of Gender.

Gender in the Discipline

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender in the Discipline).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 447.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

WOMENSTD 483. Special Topics.

Section 002 — A Critique of Western Feminism.

Instructor(s): Nesha Z Haniff

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 240. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 7 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of seven credits elected through WOMENSTD 481, 482, 483, and 484.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Feminist thought as it has been constructed has referred largely to a Western interpretation of feminism. Indeed, because it has been construed as theoretical, it was then seen by definition as the purvey of Western feminism. This concept of feminism has been challenged by many feminists of color and feminists outside the United States. This course will examine a radical interpretation of feminism that encompasses the complex realities of Women of Color and Third World Women. The concept of contradiction will be used as the overarching theoretical construct to viewing the lives of these women. A series of readings and films will be used to explore this theory of contradiction. Contradiction as a feminist construct for Women of Color and Third World Women will be evaluated by looking at examples from Africa, Asia, and the U.S. How does one explain, for example, that India has some of the most radical feminist movements in the world and had a female Prime Minister, but is also the place of severe crimes against women such as bride burning that have been culturally entrenched. How does one resolve the perception of Latinas as entrenched in religious martyrdom to family and husband and the presence of Violetta Barrios de Chamorro, who was president of Nicaragua? And in the U.S., Shirley Chisolm ran for president of the United States and Carol Mosely Braun was among the first women to be U.S. senators, both African American women? African American women have been the brunt of every discrimination felt in this country. The Feminist Thought that is emerging as non-Western at its core is extremely complex and vexing. This will be the project of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 483. Special Topics.

Section 003 — Middle School Girls and Research: Theory and Practice. Meets with Psychology 401.004 and Education 547.002.

Instructor(s): Pamela Trotman Reid (pamreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 240. (3). May be elected for a maximum of 7 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of seven credits elected through WOMENSTD 481, 482, 483, and 484.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide the opportunity to discuss the role of gender, social class, and ethnicity in early adolescent development and the relationships, aspirations and attitudes that girls develop in school, family and peer contexts. Theories of development will be considered and their application in a real setting will be examined. Issues of achievement, self-esteem, and cognitive development will be covered as the class engages in mentoring activities with 7th graders in a Detroit-based Saturday school program. (An earlier version of the program may be viewed at http://www.umich.edu/~umgirls)

Students in the course will develop case studies, program evaluation reports, and pedagogical skills. Comfort with math and statistics are recommended since these will provide the basis for the interaction with the 7th graders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 484. Special Topics.

Section 001 — Women and Higher Education in America, 1700-2003. Meets with RCSSCI 460.002.

Instructor(s): Margaret L Steneck (msten@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 240. (4). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 7 credits. Degree credit is granted for a combined total of seven credits elected through WOMENSTD 481, 482, 483, and 484.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 460.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 496 / AAPTIS 496. Gender and Representation in the Modern Middle East.

Gender in a Global Context

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol B Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender in a Global Context).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 496.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 501. Introduction to Graduate Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U."

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to graduate study in the joint Women's Studies program and to faculty research areas. Discussions will focus on professional issues (negotiating the requirements of the joint PhD program, applying for grants, submitting papers to conferences, etc.). Faculty will visit to discuss feminist research and methodologies in their disciplines.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor.

WOMENSTD 530. Theories of Feminism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen (hrosen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores important trends and debates in feminist theory over the last two decades. We will examine various ways that feminist scholars across the disciplines have theorized power and difference with regard to gender, race, sexuality, class, and nation. We will also consider critiques of mainstream feminist theories from alternative feminist perspectives. And we will explore the relationship of particular theories to political practice and changing historical circumstances. Although our readings will focus on theoretical works, seminar discussion and writing assignments will encourage exploration of how feminist theories might enrich and illuminate participant's own research and scholarship.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

WOMENSTD 580. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 530 and Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

WOMENSTD 621 / HISTORY 621. Studies in Women's History.

Section 001 — Women, Gender, and Representation in American History.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; Upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 621.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

WOMENSTD 690. Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 698. Special Seminar.

Section 002 — Making Women's History: The United States. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Mary C Kelley (mckelley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One graduate course in Women's Studies. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers an introduction to the recent historiographical and theoretical literature in U.S. women's history. We will take as our chronological focus the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. Topics we will consider include family structure, gender expectations, and cultural practices. The character and significance of women's increasing involvement in public life will also be explored. Throughout our examination, we will look closely at the intersections of gender, race, and class in the development of subjectivities. Changing concepts of equality and difference, as women and men have employed them in articulating gender relations, will serve as a theoretical framework for our examination. The course is designed as a colloquium rather than a research seminar. Class members will be responsible for presenting introductions and analytical critiques of the readings at our weekly meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 698. Special Seminar.

Section 003 — Gender, Culture & Development: Issue for Global Feminism. [3 Credits]. Meets with Sociology 595.004.

Instructor(s): Jayati Lal (jlal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One graduate course in Women's Studies. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/fall/womenstd/698/003.nsf

This course explores the historical politics of 'global feminism' through various registers. The readings will not pursue a chronological narrative, nor will they cover all the contentious issues that have framed the varied dialogs in global feminism. Rather, the course syllabus aims to unpack and interrogate the very terms through which such a dialog has proceeded. What are the issues for global feminism and how have these defined? Who speaks for whom? What and how have the terms of this debate been overdetermined by the assumptions of prevailing scholarly paradigms on modernization, modernity and development? Indeed, assumptions about the spread of capitalism and the content of patriarchy have shaped both the demand for and content of 'global' feminism.

The problem of the global will first be addressed by exploring the troubling legacy of Orientalism as a mode of representing 'other' (Third World) women to (and for) the 'West' on the one hand, and postcolonial academic feminist discourses that interrupt this vexed history of translation and representation on the other. We will also examine the theoretical and methodological strategies of constructing the subject and object of the interdisciplinary field of "women and development," and note the similarities in Orientalist and Developmentalist discourses. This analytic framework will provide the lens through which we will critically appraise the various public and private arenas — cultural, political, economic — in and through which the essential 'difference' between West and Non-West have been and are (re) produced in feminist theory, discourse and practice. In the latter half of the course, we will thus be doing close readings of some recent texts on body politics (fgm, sexuality and sex work/tourism), labor (factory, domestic and home-based) and civil/cultural/human rights. We will end the course by considering how recent examples of feminist internationalisms and 'local' feminisms have informed a more democratic versions of and visions for global and transnational feminisms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 698. Special Seminar.

Section 004 — Race, Gender, And Empire: The Political Culture of U.S. Imperialism [3 credits]. Meets with Hist 604.002.

Instructor(s): Penny M Von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One graduate course in Women's Studies. Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 604.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

WOMENSTD 720 / HISTART 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts.

Section 001 — Case Studies from Prehistory to the Renaissance.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu) , Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 720.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

WOMENSTD 801. Special Seminar.

Section 003 — Language and Aging. [3 credits]. Meets with LING 792.003.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 792.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 801. Special Seminar.

Section 004 — Feminism and Health. Meets with Nursing 852.001.

Instructor(s): Guthrie

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar, open to students in public health, anthropology, and women's studies, is designed to explore in an in-depth fashion how the intersections of race/class/gender and other axes of "difference" (i.e., age, sexual orientation, disability status, immigrant status) affect women's health in the contemporary United States. In this course, recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and "multiplicity of oppressions" theories will be introduced. Weekly, student-led, feminist-oriented seminar discussions will revolve around twelve book-length ethnographic studies, which examine some aspect of intersectionality and women's health outcomes in the U.S. Through reading, thinking, talking, and writing about a series of ethnographic monographs, students in this course will gain broad exposure to a number of exigent women's health issues in the U.S., issues of ethnographic research design, and the interdisciplinary theorizing of feminist, (medical) anthropological, and public health scholars. Students will be graded on seminar participation, leadership of one seminar discussion, and a comparative written review of three books on black women's health in the U.S.

Books to be covered in the seminar include:

  • Emily Martin, The Woman in the Body: A Cultural Analysis of Reproduction
  • Martha Ward, Poor Women, Powerful Men: America's Great Experiment in Family Planning
  • Leith Mullings, Stress and Resilience: The Harlem Women's Reproductive Health Project
  • Paul Farmer et al., Women, Poverty, and AIDS: Sex, Drugs, and Structural Violence
  • Elisa Sobo, Choosing Unsafe Sex: AIDS-Risk Denial Among Disadvantaged Women
  • Claire Sterk, Tricking and Tripping
  • Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Girl, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures
  • Pamela Ericksen, Teenage Childbearing in East L.A.
  • Mimi Nichter, Fat Talk: What Girls and Their Parents Say About Dieting
  • Ellen Lewin, Lesbian Mothers: Accounts of Gender in American Culture
  • Helena Ragone, Surrogate Motherhood: Conception in the Heart
  • Gelya Frank, Venus on Wheels: Two Decades of Dialogue on Disability, Biography, and Being Female in America
  • Renee White, Putting Risk in Perspective: Black Teenage Lives in the Era of AIDS
  • Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty
  • Susan Smith, Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women's Health Activism in America, 1890-1950

Enrollment is limited, so students interested in taking the course must seek permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 890. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Every Women's Studies graduate certificate student is required to carry out a research project with a feminist perspective. The form of the project will vary with individual students and is subject to approval by the student's faculty advisor. This can be a chapter of a dissertation, a prelim, a master's thesis project or a project undertaken in the Women's Studies Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

WOMENSTD 891. Joint Ph.D. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and Permission of instructor required. Must be admitted to joint Ph.D. in English/WS or Psych/WS. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the interdepartmental doctoral program, students have the opportunity to work out an interdisciplinary approach to a research problem with a faculty committee from an early stage of their training. They benefit from the kind of interdisciplinary mentorship that is necessary to develop and complete an interdisciplinary dissertation.

The course is designed to culminate in the production of an interdisciplinary research paper. The process for achieving this goal will vary from year to year. However, students are encouraged, wherever possible, to build on the work they began in their first year, in the required courses on Feminist Theory (WOMENSTD 530) and Approaches to Feminist Scholarship (WOMENSTD 601 or 603).

The preliminary exam in Women' Studies is based on the research paper completed in the WOMENSTD 891. The student will defend the paper in an oral exam to the prelim committee. This prelim committee should include at least one member from Women's Studies, who is not also appointed in the English Department, and one from the English Department, who is not also appointed in Women's Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

WOMENSTD 990. Dissertation-Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Advanced Doctoral Students. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

WOMENSTD 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


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