College of LS&A

Fall Academic Term 2003 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Music History and Musicology


This page was created at 6:19 PM on Tue, Sep 23, 2003.

Fall Academic Term 2003 (September 2 - December 19)


MUSICOL 501. Introduction to Graduate Study.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Becker, Stein

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of musicology, by focusing on bibliographic control, research methods, disciplinary genealogies, and key issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 503 / SI 586. Bibliography of Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Reynolds

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Emphasis will be upon learning to locate and evaluate various tools of music research. The course also includes the study of editing music to scholarly standards and recent developments in on-line searching for music materials. Some assignments will permit students to focus on their own specialties.

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MUSICOL 505. Special Course.

Section 001 — Rock and Roll: The First Two Decades. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 405.001.

Instructor(s): Zak

Prerequisites: (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At first it was simply an angle, a way of naming rhythm and blues for a wider and younger audience. But gradually rock and roll became a distinct music, with its own songs, stars, and sound. It was defined by an eclectic attitude, a burst of energy, and a minimal sense of history. Musical styles of many sorts were thrown together with little regard for established notions of taste or authenticity. Indeed, the improbable became an integral element of the rock and roll aesthetic. It seemed an infantile, throwaway music. Even many of its stars were certain that it wouldn't last. This course explores the beginnings of rock and roll in the 1950s and its continued development in the 1960s, an era whose music has in fact had a lasting and profound cultural influence.

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MUSICOL 506. Special Course.

Section 001 — Western Music, 1850-1900. [credits?] Meets with MUSICOL 406.001.

Instructor(s): Wiley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-4). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

'Western Art Music, 1850-1900' investigates the principal advances of the period in opera, orchestral music, selected additional genres, and post-romanticism. Among the operas considered are Wagner's Die Walküre, Verdi's Aïda, Musorgsky's Boris Godunov, and Tchaikovsky's Evgenii Onegin; among the orchestral works, Brahms' First Symphony, Tchaikovsky's Fifth, and Mahler's Second. Grading factors: two midterm examinations and a final (MUSICOL 406); in addition students who elect MUSICOL 506 will be expected to write an analytical paper on a substantial piece composed in this period, explaining its structure and style in relation to the advances in the period. Students are encouraged, in consultation with the instructor, to choose their paper topics early.

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MUSICOL 508. Special Course.

Section 001 — Beethoven's Music. [credits?] Meets with MUSICOL 408.001.

Instructor(s): Whiting

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course surveys Beethoven's music in the appropriate stylistic, biographical, historical, and cultural contexts. Emphasis will fall on the analysis and interpretation of finished works (rather than sketch studies and "compositional genesis"). Weekly reading assignments will supplement the lectures and introduce students to the breadth of approaches taken in current Beethoven scholarship. The textbook will be Maynard Solomon's Beethoven (second, revised edition, 1998), available at Shaman Drum. While the course is designed primarily for undergraduate and graduate students in music, non-music majors who can follow scores and are acquainted with the rudiments of music theory will also be welcome. Grades will be based on in-class participation, an analytical essay (10-12 pages), and one examination (final).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 509. Teaching of Introductory Courses in Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stein

Prerequisites: (2). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Open to all graduate students in music. This is a pedagogy course, and doctoral students can elect it to satisfy their pedagogy requirement. The goal of the course is to help students develop good classroom teaching skills and strategies for introductory courses in music. Students will be asked to engage with music verbally, give class presentations on a weekly basis, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 513. History of Opera.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 413.001.

Instructor(s): Stein

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is devoted to the study of opera in the first two centuries of its existence, from its beginnings just before 1600 to nearly the end of the 18th century. Here opera is to be studied critically as music, as theater, as spectacle, as performance medium, and as cultural expression. While some of the lectures and listening assignments will be organized around excerpts, others will be designed to focus on whole operas, their musical dramaturgy, historical significance, economics, modes of production, and impact and reception in performance. Composers to be studied include Monteverdi, Cavalli, Lully, Purcell, Hidalgo, A. Scarlatti, Handel, Vivaldi, Rameau, Gluck, Sarti, Piccinni, Mozart, and Haydn. The assignments in this course will be primarily listening assignments, to be supplemented by score study, readings from the course pack or materials on reserve, and some in-class performances. Grades will be based on written work and class participation.

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MUSICOL 550. Music in the United States.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 450.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Music in the United States" is open to both undergraduates and graduate students. The goal of the course is to offer an overview of music's development in what is now the United States of America, beginning in the 1500s and extending to the present, and to examine the function of music in American life. Recognizing that courses on American classical music, jazz, rock and roll, musical theatre, and African American music are already taught in the School of Music, and that many American genres are part of virtually every student's experience, the instructor has designed this course with the hope of illuminating connections among these and other kinds of American music, as well links among the musical traditions of Europe, Africa, and North America. By looking at the whole of American music history in a single course, we can observe continuities and disjunctions that might otherwise go unnoticed.

This course will use UM emeritus professor Richard Crawford's textbook, An Introduction to America's Music, and its accompanying CD set (available at Shaman Drum Books). Taking performance, rather than composition, as its primary focus, the book examines five centuries of music making on the North American continent.

Course work will center on reading, close listening, musical and cultural analysis, discussion, class performances, and group projects, including development of the "Living Music" web-pages for the School of Music's American Music Institute. Students will be asked to write a number of short papers. There will be weekly quizzes, but no exams. Graduate students, in addition to the regular assignments, will write a term paper on a topic of their choice, selected in consultation with the instructor.

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MUSICOL 581. Special Projects.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 591. Musicology Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Master's students only. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (2-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

THIRD-TERM REVIEW: RESEARCH PAPER. Beginning in the second term and extending into the third term, a student will develop the topic for his or her third-term paper. In consultation with members of the faculty, the student will chose a research topic that will be original in material or in approach, and will demonstrate the student's ability to pursue a rigorous program of research and writing reflecting contemporary scholarly paradigms. The recommended length for this paper is 35-40 pages of prose, in addition to the bibliography, with appendices, musical examples or transcriptions as needed. Three copies of the paper are to be submitted to the departmental Director of Graduate Studies by September 15 (or the first business day thereafter) of the second year of study. After faculty critique, a revised version will be submitted six weeks thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

MUSICOL 592. Musicology Paper.

Section 001 — Third-Term Paper.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: MUSICOL 501 and 502. Graduate standing. (2-6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A required course for Musicology graduate students. Students may elect MUSICOL 592, Third-Term Paper (for 1-2 hrs. per term in the second and third terms).

THIRD-TERM REVIEW: RESEARCH PAPER. During the fall term of the second year of graduate study the student will be expected to: Write a critical-bibliographical paper on a topic of the student's choice. This third-term paper should explain and review a selected topic in musicology or music history (including a discussion of music), survey and evaluate the available literature on the topic, and identify lines of inquiry which remain to be pursued. The recommended length for this paper is 35-40 pages of prose, in addition to the bibliography, with appendices and musical examples as needed. Three copies of the paper are to be submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies by September 15 (or the first business day thereafter) of the second year of study. After faculty critique, a revised version will be submitted six weeks thereafter. If a student has not successfully fulfilled the requirements of the third-term review, but has performed adequately in other respects, he or she will be awarded a terminal master's degree.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 605. Special Course.

Section 001 — Lyric Arts in St. Petersburg. [credits?]

Instructor(s): Wiley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

‘The Lyric Arts in St. Petersburg' is a doctoral seminar, part of the university-wide celebration of the 300th anniversary of the founding of St. Petersburg. It will investigate music and music theatre from the 18th century at least to the Revolution of 1917, with emphasis on the emergence of a distinctive imagery and style associated with the city. To this end, emphasis will be placed on two works first produced in 1890, Tchaikovsky's The Sleeping Beauty and The Queen of Spades. Reading ability in Russian or French (or, less critically, German) is essential for this seminar. An analytical paper on a selected work is expected of the class members, subject to first draft and revision in written form, and summarized for verbal presentation in class. Entrance into this seminar is by permission of the instructor. "Walk-ons" are not assured admittance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

MUSICOL 646. Studies in Late 19th-Century Styles.

Section 001 — The Song Cycle.

Instructor(s): Naomi André

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on the operas of Giuseppe Verdi. The repertory will cover a broad cross-section of his operas throughout his career (1840s-1893). In addition to a general overview, specific operas will be studied in more depth. Issues to be covered include the conventions of 19th-century Italian opera, aspects of Verdi's biography, and the Italian and French milieux in which Verdi was working. Methodological paradigms will be drawn from music scholarship as well as literary theory, feminist reading, and cultural studies. Grades will be based on class participation and written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 760. Colloquium in Ethnomusicology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stillman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The field of ethnomusicology is currently involved in many of the same issues that are redefining anthropology, history, and cultural studies, such as the use of multiple theories of interpretation and discourse, issues of writerly authority, positioning of the scholar in reference to her work, feminism, post-colonialism, and all the other "post...isms" of the end of this century. This colloquium will provide a forum for the discussion of some of these contemporary issues. Short readings will be assigned each week. The colloquium is required for all incoming graduate students in ethnomusicology. All graduate students in ethnomusicology are strongly urged to enroll; Other graduate students may enroll with permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 881. Special Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: For Ph.D. students only. Graduate standing. Permission of instructor required. (2-6). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

MUSICOL 900. Preliminary Examinations.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. For use by students not otherwise enrolled. Permission of instructor required. (1). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This examination normally includes a listening exam and two essays, the general sense and limits of which have been discussed in advance with the prospective dissertation advisor. One essay will cover the entire period of research. The second will be more closely focused on the proposed dissertation topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required.

MUSICOL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. The dissertation proposal will consist of a carefully researched and written description of the proposed topic (approximately 20-25 pages) that will argue for its relevance, feasibility, and originality as a scholarly contribution to the field of musicology. The proposal should also describe the plan of research and indicate as precisely as possible the objectives of the project, the sources to be consulted, the current state of research, and the cultural, musical, methodological, historical, aesthetic, anthropological, critical, analytical and social issues relevant to the topic. If the project involves fieldwork, the proposal should indicate how it will be carried out and what criteria will be applied in the evaluation of data.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.

MUSICOL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

While researching and writing the dissertation, each Ph.D. candidate will present a lecture in a public forum before an audience of students and departmental faculty. This dissertation oral presentation will describe the topic, methodology, and results of his or her dissertation research to date. This lecture will customarily be presented at a point when the candidate can benefit most from the exchange: after enough research has taken place to define the chief issues of the topic but before a large portion has been written.

The dissertation in historical musicology must make a significant and original contribution to the field, and otherwise conform to the standards of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department required.


Undergraduate Course Listings for MUSICOL.


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