College of LS&A

Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology

This page was created at 3:58 PM on Wed, Jun 19, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Introductory psychology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 40% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 60% of the grade). Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Readings

  • Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.
  • Hastorf, A. H. and Cantril, H."They saw a game: A case study." Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 1954, 129-134. (CP)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5; Get on the waitlist through wolverineaccess.umich.edu. If space opens up due to enrolled students dropping the course, the instructor will contact students individually.

PSYCH 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 616 / SOC 616. Analysis of Survey Data.

Section 201 – Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics, or an instructor approved equivalent, working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and basic familiarity with survey methods (Psych. 613/Soc. 510 or Psych.684/Soc.614).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Mick P. Couper, University of Michigan

Survey data have features that differ from data generated from other types of data collection methods. This course provides participants with an overview of the nature of those features and an introduction to methods that properly handle the unique features of survey data. The course begins with a brief overview of survey design and its implications for analysis, and then covers the logic and methods of analysis, measurement theory and evaluation, scaling and index construction, contingency table analysis, and linear and logistic regression methods for bivariate and multivariate models. Logistic regression is extended to incorporate multinomial and ordered logit types of models. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods taught in this course using computer software is taught in the companion course, Computer Analysis of Survey Data II.

Prerequisites: (1) Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics or an instructor approved equivalent, (2) working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and (3) basic familiarity with survey methods. A self-diagnostic examination is available to assess whether students have adequate skills for this course. Please click here to download the diagnostic as an Adobe .pdf file. Please e-mail your answers to summers@isr.umich.edu. We will respond with your score and our recommendations about your preparation for the course. All students electing this course are strongly encouraged to complete the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 619. Supervised Research I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Known as the "First Year 6l9 Research Project." This is an individual instruction course; when enrolling for 6l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 687 / SOC 612. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 201 – SRC SUMMER INSTITUTE VIDEO COURSE. 8 WEEKS, 3 CREDITS. MEETS JUNE 4 - JULY 27. Room 368 ISR.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 612.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 688 / SOC 688. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 201 – Introduction to Survey Research Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 6 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Sue Ellen Hansen , Maria Krysan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Introductory psychology and statistics and permission of instructor; Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, but not required.

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Research Techniques 8 weeks, June 3- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 6 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructors: Maria Krysan, University of Illinois–Chicago; Sue Ellen Hansen, University of Michigan

This eight-week course will acquaint students with the theory and practice of survey research broadly defined as research that relies upon face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, or self-administered questionnaires as a primary means of data collection. The course involves lectures, readings, and discussions covering the basics of the major stages of a survey, including hypothesis and problem formulation, study design, sampling, questionnaire and interview design and evaluation, techniques of interviewing, code development and coding of data, data cleaning and management, data analysis, and report writing. Students will gain practical experience in these areas through the development and implementation of a survey. Participants are encouraged to bring materials related to their own research interests.

Prerequisite: Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, although not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 706. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 711 / SOC 711. Questionnaire Design.

Section 201 – SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Pamela C Campanelli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questionnaire Design 4 weeks, June 3-28, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Pamela Campanelli, Survey Methods Consultant

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research, exploring the theoretical issues that arise in their development, application and interpretation as well as the practical aspects of questionnaire design that are often not taught in formal courses. The emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing both factual and non-factual material using survey questions. Topics include cognitive guidelines for question construction to ensure respondent understanding, techniques for measuring the occurrence of past behaviors and events, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on responses, an introduction to the psychometric perspectives in question scale design, combining individual questions into a meaningful questionnaire, special guidelines for self-completion surveys versus interview surveys, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and an introduction to techniques for testing survey questions. There will be exercises both in and outside of class that will lead to the development of a class questionnaire which will then be tested. Students' choice of questionnaire topic will be constrained by the ability to locally interview individuals who match the topic's target population.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 719. Supervised Research II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 7l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 819. Supervised Research III.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 879. Internship in Clinical Psychology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 779 and permission of practicum supervisor. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 201 – Statistical Analysis with Missing Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Trivellore E Raghunathan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Statistical Analysis with Missing Data 1 week, July 22-26, 6:00-9:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Trivellore E. Raghunathan, University of Michigan

Missing data is a pervasive problem faced by many analysts. This course will discuss several approaches and methods for analyzing data with missing values. The course will be offered at an advanced statistical level and include: a discussion of ignorable and nonignorable missing data mechanisms; unit nonresponse adjustments through weighting and post-stratification; multiple imputation for item nonresponse; and maximum likelihood with incomplete data. Methods for nonignorable missing data mechansim including selection models, pattern-mixture models, informative censoring models. Several software options for analyzing data with missing values will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: Advanced practical and technical knowledge of standard statistical distributions and models for complete data, e.g., normal linear model, loglinear model for contingency tables, logistic regression models, and basic understanding of the method of maximum likelihood.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 202 – Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute video course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Valerie E Lee , Robert G Croninger

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am- 12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Valerie Lee, University of Michigan; Robert Croninger, University of Maryland

Although many surveys gather data on multiple units of analysis (e.g., individuals, the groups or organizations in which individuals participate, the same measures taken over multiple time periods), most statistical procedures cannot make full use of data with this nested structure: individuals nested within groups, measures nested within individuals, and other nesting levels that may be of analytic interest. In this course, students are introduced to an increasingly common statistical technique, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Multi-level methods and the HLM software can (and should be) used to analyze nested data and multi-level research questions. Although the course demonstrates multiple uses of the HLM software, including growth-curve modeling, the major focus is on the investigation of organizational effects on individual-level outcomes. Although we use, for instructional purposes, data drawn from a nationally representative sample of U.S. elementary schools, students, and teachers, the multi-level analysis skills taught in this course are equally applicable in many social science fields: sociology, public health, psychology, demography, political science, and in the general field of organizational theory. Typically the course enrolls students from all these fields. Students will learn to conceptualize, conduct, interpret, and write up their own multi-level analyses, as well as to understand relevant statistical and practical issues.

Prerequisites: At least one graduate-level course in statistics or quantitative methods, and experience with multivariate regression models, including both analysis of data and interpretation of results.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 203 – Analysis of Survey Data I. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data I 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Research in the social sciences has increasingly come to rely on statistical concepts in the development and evaluation of research designs, as well as in the presentation and analysis of data. The application of a wide variety of research designs, including both experimental and non-experimental designs, requires real understanding of fundamental statistical concepts. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between research design and statistical analysis. Its main objective is the conceptual understanding of statistical reasoning rather than the rote application of statistical formulae. The course begins with a broad overview of research designs frequently used by survey researchers. It then focuses upon estimation of sampling error, sampling design, and sampling distributions of sums, means, and percents for simple random samples. In the second half of the course, data analytic techniques most commonly used in the context of these research designs are presented (t-tests, correlation analysis, and regression analysis). Additional topics include: normal approximations, measurement error, hypothesis testing, probability samples, and calculating sample size for specified precision levels.

Prerequisite: Mathematics through college algebra.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 204 – Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu) , Michael Schober

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Norbert Schwarz, University of Michigan; Michael Schober, New School University

Survey data are only as meaningful as the answers that respondents provide. Hence, the processes that underlie respondents' answers are of crucial importance. This course draws on current theorizing in cognitive and social psychology pertaining to issues like language comprehension, information storage and retrieval, autobiographical memory, and social judgment to understand how respondents make sense of the questions asked and arrive at an answer. Of particular interest are the implications of cognitive and communicative processes for data quality and questionnaire construction. The applied topics covered include question wording and comprehension; the impact of response alternatives on respondents' answers; the emergence of question order and context effects in attitude measurement; and the processes that affect the validity of retrospective behavioral reports. Throughout, we explore factors that may potentially bias reports, as well as factors that are likely to improve data quality.

Prerequisite: Some background in psychology is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 205 – Introduction to Questionnaire Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 10-14.

Instructor(s): Barbel Knauper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Questionnaire Design 1 week, June 10-14, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Bärbel Knäuper, McGill University

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research and the practical issues that arise in their development, application, and interpretation. The major emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing attitudes, opinions, behaviors, events, factual material, subjective experiences and self-assessments using survey questions. Topics include: unstructured vs. structured interviews, open-ended vs. fixed-response forms, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on survey responses, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and techniques for identifying and revising problematic questions. The course will provide practical recommendations for how to develop survey questionnaires. The workshop involves lectures, discussions, and exercises. The homework assignments are intended to offer practical experience by critiquing existing questionnaires and by developing new questions. Participants are strongly encouraged to e-mail question or questionnaire examples from their own work to the instructor a week before the beginning of the course (bknauper@psych.mcgill.ca).

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 206 – Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu) , Marc A Musick

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Jim Lepkowski, University of Michigan; Marc Musick, University of Texas

The analysis of data requires a broad understanding of how data are structured and how different statistical methods can and should be applied to data. Analysts have a wide variety of statistical methods to choose from, but they must understand the basic premise of the method and the fundamental assumptions which must be met for application to be valid. Analysis of Survey Data III is a continuation of Analysis of Survey Data II (although prepared students may take this course without having completed Analysis of Survey Data II, after taking a diagnostic exam). The course concentrates on widely used methods for the analysis of survey data. Before considering those analytic methods, the course examines the likelihood principle and the associated estimation and testing procedures that follow from it. The principle and methods of maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood test procedures are then applied to methods developed in Analysis of Survey Data II, and extended to additional methods such as Tobit regression, Poisson and negative binomial regression, mixed effects analysis of variance models, simple path models, factor analysis, and structural equation models. Several multivariate analysis methods such as multivariate regression and analysis of variance are also examined. The course concludes with an examination of weighting, imputation, and variance estimation in complex sample designs. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods in lecture uses SAS, SPSS, Stata, LISREL, and IVEware. Use of SAS, LISREL, and IVEware is taught in the companion Computer Analysis of Survey Data III.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Analysis of Survey Data II, an instructor-approved equivalent, or satisfactory performance on the course diagnostic exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 206 – Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu) , Marc A Musick

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Jim Lepkowski, University of Michigan; Marc Musick, University of Texas

The analysis of data requires a broad understanding of how data are structured and how different statistical methods can and should be applied to data. Analysts have a wide variety of statistical methods to choose from, but they must understand the basic premise of the method and the fundamental assumptions which must be met for application to be valid. Analysis of Survey Data III is a continuation of Analysis of Survey Data II (although prepared students may take this course without having completed Analysis of Survey Data II, after taking a diagnostic exam). The course concentrates on widely used methods for the analysis of survey data. Before considering those analytic methods, the course examines the likelihood principle and the associated estimation and testing procedures that follow from it. The principle and methods of maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood test procedures are then applied to methods developed in Analysis of Survey Data II, and extended to additional methods such as Tobit regression, Poisson and negative binomial regression, mixed effects analysis of variance models, simple path models, factor analysis, and structural equation models. Several multivariate analysis methods such as multivariate regression and analysis of variance are also examined. The course concludes with an examination of weighting, imputation, and variance estimation in complex sample designs. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods in lecture uses SAS, SPSS, Stata, LISREL, and IVEware. Use of SAS, LISREL, and IVEware is taught in the companion Computer Analysis of Survey Data III.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Analysis of Survey Data II, an instructor-approved equivalent, or satisfactory performance on the course diagnostic exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 207 – Evaluation Research Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Evaluation Research Design 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Studies of the highest quality require the strongest possible research design. This course provides various ways in which inference can be strengthened in those research contexts for which random assignment is not possible due to real-world constraints. Focus will be placed upon practical design and measurement strategies rather than on statistical analysis. Especially important among the methods presented are design procedures aimed to enhance one's ability to make causal inference and to generalize results. Methodological tactics for eliminating threats to validity will be emphasized using examples from a variety of disciplines including public health, education, political science, sociology, psychology, social work, and business. Studies combining both experiments and surveys will be included. Principles that establish causal inference will be illustrated in a wide range of observational designs (e.g., non-equivalent control group, pretest-posttest, time-series, cohort, case-control, regression-discontinuity, patched-up, reversal, multiple baseline, and case study) most commonly found in those disciplines. Recent developments in meta-analysis will be discussed in the context of inferences that cannot be made within single studies. The course should prove particularly useful for graduate students and researchers who are actively planning research, since feedback from the instructor and other students will allow them to improve their proposed studies.

Prerequisite: Knowledge of introductory statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 208 – Event History Analysis. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 2 credits. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Jay Teachman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Analysis 1 week, June 17-21, 9:00 am-4:00 pm daily 2 credit hours Instructor: Jay Teachman, Western Washington University

The use of event history data, recording the timing and duration of life experiences, has become common in the social sciences. The application of conventional analysis tools to event histories can produce severe bias or loss of information. This course shows how these difficulties can be overcome, enabling the analyst to realize the full benefit of event history data. The emphasis is on "regression-like" models, commonly known as proportional hazards models or hazard–rate models, in which the rate of an event occurring varies according to a set of explanatory variables. Topics will include data structures, life tables, censoring, discrete–time models, parametric models, nonparametric models, time-varying explanatory variables, unobserved heterogeneity, competing risks, and repeatable events.

Prerequisite: One graduate-level course in statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 210 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): John Van Hoewyk

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hours Instructor: John Van Hoewyk, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data III must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data III.

This course is a computer laboratory designed to accompany Analysis of Survey Data III. It emphasizes the use of computer statistical packages to obtain results related to topics discussed in Analysis of Survey Data III. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course provides practical experience in all methods discussed in the companion course using SAS, LISREL, and IVEware in the University of Michigan computing environment. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data III.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 211 – Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Barber, Lisa D Pearce (lisapear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview 2 weeks, July 1-12, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Jennifer Barber, University of Michigan; Lisa Pearce, University of Michigan

In this course, participants will become familiar with multiple methods of data collection and how they can be combined within a single research project. The methods of focus will be unstructured or in–depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, and survey interviews. Emphasis will be placed on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and we will focus on how each different method can contribute to the research question in unique ways. This course is designed for those with a specific research question in mind, but who are new to collecting data (or new to multi-method approaches to collecting data). Throughout the course, participants will be asked to design and present multi–method approaches to a research question of their choice. By the end of this module, participants will have an overview of multi-method research that will enable them to design, understand, and evaluate multi-method approaches within a single project.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 212 – Introduction to Survey Quality. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Paul Biemer , Lars Lyberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Quality 1 week, June 24-28, 1:00-5:00 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Paul Biemer, Research Triangle Institute; Lars Lyberg, Statistics Sweden

This one–week course will span a range of topics dealing with the quality of data collected through the survey process. The course begins with discussion of total survey error, as measured by the mean squared error, and its relationship to survey costs and general quality dimensions such as timeliness, coherence, and accessibility. Then the major sources of error in surveys are discussed in some detail, including (a) the origins of each error source (i.e., its root causes), (b) the most successful methods as we know them for reducing the errors emanating from these error sources, and (c) methods that are most often used in practice for evaluating the effects of the sources on total survey error. The course will expose participants to concepts and ideas for understanding the nature of survey error, techniques for improving survey quality, and, where possible, their cost implications, and methods for evaluating data quality in ongoing survey programs. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic but rather as an introduction to the field of survey quality.

Prerequisite: Some prior research experience is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 213 – Web Survey Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Mick Couper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Design 1 week, July 8-12, 9:00 a.m.-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Mick Couper, University of Michigan

The course will focus on the design of web survey instruments and procedures, based on theories of human-computer interaction, interface design, and research on self-administered questionnaires and computer-assisted interviewing. The course will begin with a review of web or Internet surveys in the general context of sources of survey error (sampling, coverage, nonresponse, measurement error, and costs). The course will then discuss different approaches to web survey design (e.g., static versus interactive) and discuss various design approaches for developing effective web surveys. The course will draw on empirical results from experiments on alternative design approaches as well as practical experience in the design and implementation of web surveys. The course will not focus on the technical aspects of web survey implementation, such as hardware, software, or programming. These will be covered in the companion course, Web Survey Implementation, taught by Scott Crawford.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. A working knowledge of survey research methods will be assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 214 – Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Steve G Heeringa

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data 8 weeks, June 4- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays 3 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructor: Steven Heeringa, University of Michigan

This is an advanced course on the analysis of survey data from complex sample designs covering methods for incorporating weighting, stratification, and clustering in estimation and inference for a wide variety of statistical analysis techniques. Alternative variance estimation procedures for statistics such as means, proportions, and percentiles as well as the coefficients of linear, logistic, and loglinear regression models will be discussed, as will methods for handling missing data arising from both unit and item nonresponse. Tuesday and Thursday lectures and discussions will cover each of the major topics in-depth. Friday computer laboratory sessions will include exercises with actual survey data to illustrate the methods covered in the class. Students will learn the use of computer software for imputation of item missing data and variance estimation in the analysis of complex sample survey data.

Prerequisite: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods, familiarity with basic sample design concepts, and data analytic techniques such as linear and logistic regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 215 – Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 4 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques 8 weeks, June 3-July 26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 4 credit hours (continues in second session) Coordinator: James Lepkowski, University of Michigan

You must be enrolled in the Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians (SPSS) to take this class.

The use of sound sample design is essential for surveys to yield estimates that have good properties – unbiased and precise, for example. Application of sampling techniques in sample design requires both an understanding of sampling principles and an opportunity to apply them. The Workshop in Sampling Techniques, a companion to Methods in Survey Sampling, is the course where students have an opportunity to apply techniques. Workshop participants acquire basic skills in sample selection techniques in a series of exercises which use frames and other materials drawn from the instructors' practice. Exercises include sampling distributions, selection techniques using microcomputers, area sampling, stratification, listing and segmenting in area sampling, telephone sampling methods, and weighting to compensate for unequal probabilities of selection and unit nonresponse. Workshop sessions will cover household sample designs in several developing countries, school and student sampling in the state of Michigan, and SRC's area sample of the United States. The workshop includes classroom sessions as well as computer laboratory sessions on Windows based microcomputers. The workshop instructors include James Lepkowski, Colm O'Muircheartaigh, Trivellore Raghunathan, Al Hermalin, and Steve Heeringa.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and simultaneous enrollment in Methods of Survey Sampling and Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. Participants seeking enrollment must also complete the special Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 216 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credit. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Patricia A Berglund

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Patricia Berglund, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data II must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data II.

This course is a computer laboratory accompanying Analysis of Survey Data II. Students taking Computer Analysis of Survey Data II will benefit from the development of skills in the use of computer statistical packages that can obtain results for methods discussed in Analysis of Survey Data II. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course will cover file preparation and manipulation, exploring data structure preparatory to index construction, index construction and evaluation, bivariate and multivariate regression analyses, logistic regression analysis, and contingency table analysis. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 217 – Event History Calendar Interviewing Methodologies. SRC Summer Institute course video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Robert F Belli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Calendar Interviewing Methodologies 1 week, June 17-21, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Monday–Friday 1 credit hour Video Course Instructor: Robert Belli, University of Michigan

Event History Calendars (EHCs) have been shown to lead to higher quality survey retrospective reports in comparison to traditional standardized question-list (Q-list) methods, without increasing interviewing time. This course will review the evidence concerning the benefits of EHCs, the cognitive theory that supports their ability to maximize the quality of retrospective reports, using EHCs in face-to-face and telephone modes, and within paper and computer-assisted instruments. Examples will concentrate on the collection of various types of social, economic, and health events, with reference periods that vary from relatively short durations (e.g., months to several years) to a lifetime review. Comparisons between EHCs and Q-lists regarding the verbal behaviors of interviewers and respondents also will be examined.

Prerequisite: An introductory course on questionnaire design, or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 218 – Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-26.

Instructor(s): David Morgan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research 2 weeks, July 15-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: David Morgan, Portland State University

This course will cover the design and execution of research projects using focus groups. The course will emphasize four basic topics: 1) how to design projects using focus groups, including issues involved in the selection and recruitment of participants; 2) how to write interview guides; 3) how to moderate focus groups; and 4) how to analyze the data from focus groups. For each of these four topics, the variety of options that are available will be presented, followed by a discussion on how to evaluate these options for your particular research purpose.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 219 – Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 15-19.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 15-19, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The course begins with a history of small-area estimation and different uses of small-area statistics in both public and private sectors. Students will learn various direct and indirect small-area estimation methods (both traditional and model-based). Different methods will be explained using simple examples. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic, but to provide an overview of small-area estimation. The course is intended for quantitatively oriented students. Formulas will be presented wherever necessary to explain some of the advanced topics but without any derivations. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: An introductory calculus-level statistics course and a course on regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 221 – Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 1-12.

Instructor(s): Nancy Riley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing 2 weeks, July 1-12, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Nancy E. Riley, Bowdoin College

This course will focus on semi-structured, or in-depth, interviewing methodologies. The course will cover the goals, assumptions, process, and uses of interviewing. We will compare these methods to other related qualitative and quantitative methods in order to review strategies for choosing the appropriate mix of methods in light of research goals. The course will cover interviewing techniques, including how to decide who to interview and how to conduct successful interviews; students will conduct interviews, and discuss the process and outcome of those interviews. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of this methodology, particularly through discussion of some of the critiques of these methods (from feminist researchers and others).

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 222 – Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-27.

Instructor(s): Eben Weitzman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers 2 weeks, July 15-26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily (during the 2nd week, July 22-26, the course will meet 1:00-5:00 pm for a computer lab) 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Eben Weitzman, University of Massachusetts Boston

This course builds upon the topics taught in the qualitative methods courses, An Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research, Ethnography: Introduction and Overview, and Qualitative Methods: Semi-structured Interviewing. Once qualitative data have been collected, the researcher is faced with the (often daunting) task of making sense of it all. In this two-week course, participants will learn methods for organizing, interpreting, and drawing and verifying conclusions from qualitative data. Our approach throughout will be active, participatory, and engaged with real data. As there is a wide variety of software available to assist the researcher in managing and analyzing qualitative data, we will become familiar with some of the options and, more importantly, learn how to make intelligent, individualized selections of software that best meet the needs of a particular researcher faced with a particular project. We will apply what we learn to the analysis of real data, as we use selected software to enter, summarize, and code data collected in the previous qualitative methods courses, ending in a research report. Students who have qualitative research projects of their own, such as dissertations, may bring a sample of their data on diskette. There will be an opportunity for students in this situation to choose software for their own projects, and take some early steps in analysis. During the second week of the course, there will be a mandatory lab session held 1:00-5:00 p.m. every weekday for all participants to become familiar with relevant software.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in qualitative research methods (e.g. the previous courses in this sequence), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 223 – Model Based Small Area Estimation and Related Topics. SRC Summer Institute videocourse. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Model Based Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 22-26, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Model-based small-area estimation has received considerable importance over the past two decades. Students will learn the state–of–the–art model-based small-area estimation methods (e.g., empirical best prediction, empirical Bayes and hierarchical Bayes, etc. ) and the associated important issues regarding measures of uncertainty, model selection, model diagnostics, design-consistency, etc. The bootstrap, jackknife, and delta methods will be discussed in details in the context of measuring uncertainty of EB/EBP. In order to explain certain concepts, it will be necessary to go through a few derivations. Data analyses using several real life examples will be presented. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: A Master's degree in Statistics or another quantitative field is needed, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 224 – Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Nora Cate Schaeffer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction 1 week, June 24-28, 9:00 am-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Nora Cate Schaeffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This course provides an introductory overview of the issues that arise in writing questions for interviewer-administered surveys. We will examine the logic of measurement in standardized survey interviews, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about events and behaviors, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about attitudes and evaluations, and some techniques for testing questions. The focus is on showing how the findings from research can be applied to solving problems that routinely arise in writing survey questions. Class exercises and assignments will provide experience in solving practical problems. Most of the examples and research presented will focus on interviewer-administered interviews, but most of the principles and some of the solutions covered in the course are also relevant for self-administered instruments.

Prerequisite: Basic understanding of the goals and methods of survey research using standardized interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 226 – Web Survey Implementation. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Scott D Crawford

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Implementation 1 week, July 8-12, 3:00p.m.-6:00 p.m. daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Scott Crawford, MSInteractive, L.L.C.

The course will focus on the practical implementation of web surveys. We will trace the process that begins with a questionnaire and follow it through creating a survey, selecting sample, administering the survey, and processing the results. Survey design software will be discussed, including a review of the major types of software, available capabilities, and cost implications. Examples of survey design software will be shown. When possible, discussions will relate to the implementation of survey designs presented in the Web Survey Design course. Students will learn how to effectively manage web based data collections with regards to survey process, survey quality, and survey design. Specific issues relating to implementing web surveys as part of a multi-mode data collection will also be discussed. This course will not focus on the methodological design decisions involved in creating web surveys. Also, while some web survey systems will be used in a hands on setting, and basic instruction will be provided on their use, due to time constraints, students should not expect to master any web survey systems as part of this course.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. Students should have a basic understanding of computers and programming logic, however, no specific programming experience is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 227 – Building and Testing Structual Equation Models. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Amiram Vinokur

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Building and Testing Structual Equation Models 4 weeks, July 1-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Amiram Vinokur, University of Michigan

Since the early 80's, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analyses, first using LISREL and later using EQS, and AMOS user-friendly software packages, have gained prominence as they replace the older traditional analytic methods of factor and path analysis. SEM merges confirmatory factor analysis with path analysis and provides means for constructing, testing, and comparing comprehensive structural path models as well as comparing the goodness of fit of models and their adequacy across multiple groups (samples). This course will cover the conceptual and technical issues of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Following the presentation of major conceptual issues, five basic structural models will be described in detail. The models vary from simple to more complex ones. They also cover a wide range of situations including longitudinal and mediational analyses, comparisons between groups, and analyses that include data from different sources such as from parents, teachers, and children. The description and discussion of the models will provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply SEM techniques using EQS software for analyzing, evaluating, and reporting results produced by this analytic method. This knowledge is easily transferable to the use of LISREL or AMOS software. Course work will require students to construct and test a structural model using their own data, or data from available data sets, and produce a paper that reports their analysis and conclusions.

Prerequisite: One or more courses in statistics that included in-depth treatment of linear regression analysis, basic knowledge of the concepts of item analysis and internal reliability, and some familiarity with factor analysis. At least some hands-on experience with data analysis using SPSS, SAS, or similar software for data analysis is also required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 229 – Data Collection Methods. SRC Summer Institute video course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Robert M Groves , David Cantor

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Data Collection Methods PLEASE NOTE: there has been a time change 8 weeks, June 4-July 26, 4:15-7:00 pm Tuesdays & Thursdays; June 25th and 27th the course will meet 5:15 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: David Cantor, Weststat, Inc.; Robert Groves, University of Michigan

This course reviews alternative data collection methods used in surveys, focusing on interviewer-administered methods. It concentrates on the impact these techniques have on the quality of survey data, including measurement error properties, nonresponse, and coverage errors. The course reviews the literature on data collection methods, focusing on comparisons of major modes (face-to-face, telephone, and mail) and alternative methods of data collection (diaries, administrative records, direct observation, etc. ) The implications of mode decisions for data quality and the data collection process are discussed. Special attention is paid to the statistical and social science literatures on interviewer effects and nonresponse. Current advances in computer-assisted survey information collection (including CATI, CAPI, TDE, and VRE) will be reviewed. This is not a how-to-do-it course on survey data collection, but rather focuses on the error properties of key aspects of the data collection process.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Spring Half-Term Courses


PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night;' and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 545 – Tropical Biopsychology.

Instructor(s): Gary R Ten Eyck (teneyck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Psych. 330. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as an intensive field course in tropical biopsychology that emphasizes behavior in tropical ecosystems. Biopsychology students interested in animal behavior, field research, and rich cultural settings will find this course invaluable. Many different tropical environments will be explored including tropical rainforest, coral reefs, marine estuaries, caves, tropical rivers, grasslands and arid scrublands. A diverse array of animal life will be encountered: both diurnal and nocturnal, marine and terrestrial, vertebrates and invertebrates. It will include a trip to Tikal, an ancient Mayan city in northern Guatemala that is located in the heart of an unspoiled (primary) rainforest, now a national preserve, which provides a rich cultural experience. Other activities include: diurnal and nocturnal dives in coral reefs, a boat trip up a river, nocturnal hikes in the rainforest to observe animals that are active at night [amphibians (calling frogs), mammals, invertebrates], exploring a cave via a river, diurnal hikes in rainforest to observe free ranging monkeys and other mammals active during the day. This course will be integrated with another course from Pacific University. Although the two courses are autonomous, they will go on field trips together and share the same facilities. This will be a wonderful opportunity for students to interact with other students, both academically and socially, from different universities and geographic regions. The professor, Dr. Deke Gundersen and I are colleagues and have taught this course together before and our individual specialties and strengths are complimentary.

Students must have the instructor's permission. Times, places, texts are all "To be arranged." This is a special seminar course and many activities will be conducted one on one.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 571. Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 370 – Topic?

Instructor(s): Sandra A Graham-Bermann

Prerequisites: Psych. 370. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 616 / SOC 616. Analysis of Survey Data.

Section 101 – Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics, or an instructor approved equivalent, working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and basic familiarity with survey methods (Psych. 613/Soc. 510 or Psych.684/Soc.614).

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Mick P. Couper, University of Michigan

Survey data have features that differ from data generated from other types of data collection methods. This course provides participants with an overview of the nature of those features and an introduction to methods that properly handle the unique features of survey data. The course begins with a brief overview of survey design and its implications for analysis, and then covers the logic and methods of analysis, measurement theory and evaluation, scaling and index construction, contingency table analysis, and linear and logistic regression methods for bivariate and multivariate models. Logistic regression is extended to incorporate multinomial and ordered logit types of models. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods taught in this course using computer software is taught in the companion course, Computer Analysis of Survey Data II.

Prerequisites: (1) Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics or an instructor approved equivalent, (2) working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and (3) basic familiarity with survey methods. A self-diagnostic examination is available to assess whether students have adequate skills for this course. Please click here to download the diagnostic as an Adobe .pdf file. Please e-mail your answers to summers@isr.umich.edu. We will respond with your score and our recommendations about your preparation for the course. All students electing this course are strongly encouraged to complete the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 619. Supervised Research I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Known as the "First Year 6l9 Research Project." This is an individual instruction course; when enrolling for 6l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 672. Self-Report and MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) Assessment.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Randy Scott Roth

Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 679. History, Ethics, and Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): James H Hansell

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 687 / SOC 612. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 101 – SRC SUMMER INSTITUTE VIDEO COURSE. 8 WEEKS, 3 CREDITS. MEETS JUNE 4 - JULY 27. Room 368 ISR.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods.

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 612.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 688 / SOC 688. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 101 – Introduction to Survey Research Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 6 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Maria Krysan , Sue Ellen Hansen

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Introductory psychology and statistics and permission of instructor; Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, but not required.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Research Techniques 8 weeks, June 3- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 6 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructors: Maria Krysan, University of Illinois–Chicago; Sue Ellen Hansen, University of Michigan

This eight-week course will acquaint students with the theory and practice of survey research broadly defined as research that relies upon face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, or self-administered questionnaires as a primary means of data collection. The course involves lectures, readings, and discussions covering the basics of the major stages of a survey, including hypothesis and problem formulation, study design, sampling, questionnaire and interview design and evaluation, techniques of interviewing, code development and coding of data, data cleaning and management, data analysis, and report writing. Students will gain practical experience in these areas through the development and implementation of a survey. Participants are encouraged to bring materials related to their own research interests.

Prerequisite: Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, although not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 711 / SOC 711. Questionnaire Design.

Section 101 – SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Pamela Campanelli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questionnaire Design 4 weeks, June 3-28, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Pamela Campanelli, Survey Methods Consultant

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research, exploring the theoretical issues that arise in their development, application and interpretation as well as the practical aspects of questionnaire design that are often not taught in formal courses. The emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing both factual and non-factual material using survey questions. Topics include cognitive guidelines for question construction to ensure respondent understanding, techniques for measuring the occurrence of past behaviors and events, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on responses, an introduction to the psychometric perspectives in question scale design, combining individual questions into a meaningful questionnaire, special guidelines for self-completion surveys versus interview surveys, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and an introduction to techniques for testing survey questions. There will be exercises both in and outside of class that will lead to the development of a class questionnaire which will then be tested. Students' choice of questionnaire topic will be constrained by the ability to locally interview individuals who match the topic's target population.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 719. Supervised Research II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 7l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 786 / SOC 786. Research Design in Social Psychology.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Richard D Gonzalez

Prerequisites: Open to graduate students in social psychology, others by permission of instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 819. Supervised Research III.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 879. Internship in Clinical Psychology.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 779 and permission of practicum supervisor. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 101 – Statistical Analysis with Missing Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Trivellore E Raghunathan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Statistical Analysis with Missing Data 1 week, July 22-26, 6:00-9:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Trivellore E. Raghunathan, University of Michigan

Missing data is a pervasive problem faced by many analysts. This course will discuss several approaches and methods for analyzing data with missing values. The course will be offered at an advanced statistical level and include: a discussion of ignorable and nonignorable missing data mechanisms; unit nonresponse adjustments through weighting and post-stratification; multiple imputation for item nonresponse; and maximum likelihood with incomplete data. Methods for nonignorable missing data mechansim including selection models, pattern-mixture models, informative censoring models. Several software options for analyzing data with missing values will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: Advanced practical and technical knowledge of standard statistical distributions and models for complete data, e.g., normal linear model, loglinear model for contingency tables, logistic regression models, and basic understanding of the method of maximum likelihood.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 102 – Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute video course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Valerie E Lee , Robert G Croninger

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am- 12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Valerie Lee, University of Michigan; Robert Croninger, University of Maryland

Although many surveys gather data on multiple units of analysis (e.g., individuals, the groups or organizations in which individuals participate, the same measures taken over multiple time periods), most statistical procedures cannot make full use of data with this nested structure: individuals nested within groups, measures nested within individuals, and other nesting levels that may be of analytic interest. In this course, students are introduced to an increasingly common statistical technique, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Multi-level methods and the HLM software can (and should be) used to analyze nested data and multi-level research questions. Although the course demonstrates multiple uses of the HLM software, including growth-curve modeling, the major focus is on the investigation of organizational effects on individual-level outcomes. Although we use, for instructional purposes, data drawn from a nationally representative sample of U.S. elementary schools, students, and teachers, the multi-level analysis skills taught in this course are equally applicable in many social science fields: sociology, public health, psychology, demography, political science, and in the general field of organizational theory. Typically the course enrolls students from all these fields. Students will learn to conceptualize, conduct, interpret, and write up their own multi-level analyses, as well as to understand relevant statistical and practical issues.

Prerequisites: At least one graduate-level course in statistics or quantitative methods, and experience with multivariate regression models, including both analysis of data and interpretation of results.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 103 – Analysis of Survey Data I. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data I 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Research in the social sciences has increasingly come to rely on statistical concepts in the development and evaluation of research designs, as well as in the presentation and analysis of data. The application of a wide variety of research designs, including both experimental and non-experimental designs, requires real understanding of fundamental statistical concepts. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between research design and statistical analysis. Its main objective is the conceptual understanding of statistical reasoning rather than the rote application of statistical formulae. The course begins with a broad overview of research designs frequently used by survey researchers. It then focuses upon estimation of sampling error, sampling design, and sampling distributions of sums, means, and percents for simple random samples. In the second half of the course, data analytic techniques most commonly used in the context of these research designs are presented (t-tests, correlation analysis, and regression analysis). Additional topics include: normal approximations, measurement error, hypothesis testing, probability samples, and calculating sample size for specified precision levels.

Prerequisite: Mathematics through college algebra.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 104 – Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu) , Michael Schober

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umcih.edu/src/si

Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Norbert Schwarz, University of Michigan; Michael Schober, New School University

Survey data are only as meaningful as the answers that respondents provide. Hence, the processes that underlie respondents' answers are of crucial importance. This course draws on current theorizing in cognitive and social psychology pertaining to issues like language comprehension, information storage and retrieval, autobiographical memory, and social judgment to understand how respondents make sense of the questions asked and arrive at an answer. Of particular interest are the implications of cognitive and communicative processes for data quality and questionnaire construction. The applied topics covered include question wording and comprehension; the impact of response alternatives on respondents' answers; the emergence of question order and context effects in attitude measurement; and the processes that affect the validity of retrospective behavioral reports. Throughout, we explore factors that may potentially bias reports, as well as factors that are likely to improve data quality.

Prerequisite: Some background in psychology is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 105 – Introduction to Questionnaire Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 10-14.

Instructor(s): Barbel A Knauper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Questionnaire Design 1 week, June 10-14, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Bärbel Knäuper, McGill University

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research and the practical issues that arise in their development, application, and interpretation. The major emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing attitudes, opinions, behaviors, events, factual material, subjective experiences and self-assessments using survey questions. Topics include: unstructured vs. structured interviews, open-ended vs. fixed-response forms, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on survey responses, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and techniques for identifying and revising problematic questions. The course will provide practical recommendations for how to develop survey questionnaires. The workshop involves lectures, discussions, and exercises. The homework assignments are intended to offer practical experience by critiquing existing questionnaires and by developing new questions. Participants are strongly encouraged to e-mail question or questionnaire examples from their own work to the instructor a week before the beginning of the course (bknauper@psych.mcgill.ca).

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 106 – Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu) , Marc A Musick

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Jim Lepkowski, University of Michigan; Marc Musick, University of Texas

The analysis of data requires a broad understanding of how data are structured and how different statistical methods can and should be applied to data. Analysts have a wide variety of statistical methods to choose from, but they must understand the basic premise of the method and the fundamental assumptions which must be met for application to be valid. Analysis of Survey Data III is a continuation of Analysis of Survey Data II (although prepared students may take this course without having completed Analysis of Survey Data II, after taking a diagnostic exam). The course concentrates on widely used methods for the analysis of survey data. Before considering those analytic methods, the course examines the likelihood principle and the associated estimation and testing procedures that follow from it. The principle and methods of maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood test procedures are then applied to methods developed in Analysis of Survey Data II, and extended to additional methods such as Tobit regression, Poisson and negative binomial regression, mixed effects analysis of variance models, simple path models, factor analysis, and structural equation models. Several multivariate analysis methods such as multivariate regression and analysis of variance are also examined. The course concludes with an examination of weighting, imputation, and variance estimation in complex sample designs. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods in lecture uses SAS, SPSS, Stata, LISREL, and IVEware. Use of SAS, LISREL, and IVEware is taught in the companion Computer Analysis of Survey Data III.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Analysis of Survey Data II, an instructor-approved equivalent, or satisfactory performance on the course diagnostic exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 107 – Evaluation Research Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Evaluation Research Design 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Studies of the highest quality require the strongest possible research design. This course provides various ways in which inference can be strengthened in those research contexts for which random assignment is not possible due to real-world constraints. Focus will be placed upon practical design and measurement strategies rather than on statistical analysis. Especially important among the methods presented are design procedures aimed to enhance one's ability to make causal inference and to generalize results. Methodological tactics for eliminating threats to validity will be emphasized using examples from a variety of disciplines including public health, education, political science, sociology, psychology, social work, and business. Studies combining both experiments and surveys will be included. Principles that establish causal inference will be illustrated in a wide range of observational designs (e.g., non-equivalent control group, pretest-posttest, time-series, cohort, case-control, regression-discontinuity, patched-up, reversal, multiple baseline, and case study) most commonly found in those disciplines. Recent developments in meta-analysis will be discussed in the context of inferences that cannot be made within single studies. The course should prove particularly useful for graduate students and researchers who are actively planning research, since feedback from the instructor and other students will allow them to improve their proposed studies.

Prerequisite: Knowledge of introductory statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 108 – Event History Analysis. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 2 credits. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Jay Teachman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Analysis 1 week, June 17-21, 9:00 am-4:00 pm daily 2 credit hours Instructor: Jay Teachman, Western Washington University

The use of event history data, recording the timing and duration of life experiences, has become common in the social sciences. The application of conventional analysis tools to event histories can produce severe bias or loss of information. This course shows how these difficulties can be overcome, enabling the analyst to realize the full benefit of event history data. The emphasis is on "regression-like" models, commonly known as proportional hazards models or hazard-rate models, in which the rate of an event occurring varies according to a set of explanatory variables. Topics will include data structures, life tables, censoring, discrete-time models, parametric models, nonparametric models, time-varying explanatory variables, unobserved heterogeneity, competing risks, and repeatable events.

Prerequisite: One graduate-level course in statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 110 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): John Van Hoewyk

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hours Instructor: John Van Hoewyk, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data III must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data III.

This course is a computer laboratory designed to accompany Analysis of Survey Data III. It emphasizes the use of computer statistical packages to obtain results related to topics discussed in Analysis of Survey Data III. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course provides practical experience in all methods discussed in the companion course using SAS, LISREL, and IVEware in the University of Michigan computing environment. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data III.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 111 – Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Barber , Lisa D Pearce (lisapear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview 2 weeks, July 1-12, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Jennifer Barber, University of Michigan; Lisa Pearce, University of Michigan

In this course, participants will become familiar with multiple methods of data collection and how they can be combined within a single research project. The methods of focus will be unstructured or in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, and survey interviews. Emphasis will be placed on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and we will focus on how each different method can contribute to the research question in unique ways. This course is designed for those with a specific research question in mind, but who are new to collecting data (or new to multi-method approaches to collecting data). Throughout the course, participants will be asked to design and present multi-method approaches to a research question of their choice. By the end of this module, participants will have an overview of multi-method research that will enable them to design, understand, and evaluate multi-method approaches within a single project.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 112 – Introduction to Survey Quality. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Paul Biemer , Lars Lyberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Quality 1 week, June 24-28, 1:00-5:00 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Paul Biemer, Research Triangle Institute; Lars Lyberg, Statistics Sweden

This one-week course will span a range of topics dealing with the quality of data collected through the survey process. The course begins with discussion of total survey error, as measured by the mean squared error, and its relationship to survey costs and general quality dimensions such as timeliness, coherence, and accessibility. Then the major sources of error in surveys are discussed in some detail, including (a) the origins of each error source (i.e., its root causes), (b) the most successful methods as we know them for reducing the errors emanating from these error sources, and (c) methods that are most often used in practice for evaluating the effects of the sources on total survey error. The course will expose participants to concepts and ideas for understanding the nature of survey error, techniques for improving survey quality, and, where possible, their cost implications, and methods for evaluating data quality in ongoing survey programs. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic but rather as an introduction to the field of survey quality.

Prerequisite: Some prior research experience is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 113 – Web Survey Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Design 1 week, July 8-12, 9:00 a.m.-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Mick Couper, University of Michigan

The course will focus on the design of web survey instruments and procedures, based on theories of human-computer interaction, interface design, and research on self-administered questionnaires and computer-assisted interviewing. The course will begin with a review of web or Internet surveys in the general context of sources of survey error (sampling, coverage, nonresponse, measurement error, and costs). The course will then discuss different approaches to web survey design (e.g., static versus interactive) and discuss various design approaches for developing effective web surveys. The course will draw on empirical results from experiments on alternative design approaches as well as practical experience in the design and implementation of web surveys. The course will not focus on the technical aspects of web survey implementation, such as hardware, software, or programming. These will be covered in the companion course, Web Survey Implementation, taught by Scott Crawford.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. A working knowledge of survey research methods will be assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 114 – Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Steven G Heeringa

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data 8 weeks, June 4- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays 3 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructor: Steven Heeringa, University of Michigan

This is an advanced course on the analysis of survey data from complex sample designs covering methods for incorporating weighting, stratification, and clustering in estimation and inference for a wide variety of statistical analysis techniques. Alternative variance estimation procedures for statistics such as means, proportions, and percentiles as well as the coefficients of linear, logistic, and loglinear regression models will be discussed, as will methods for handling missing data arising from both unit and item nonresponse. Tuesday and Thursday lectures and discussions will cover each of the major topics in-depth. Friday computer laboratory sessions will include exercises with actual survey data to illustrate the methods covered in the class. Students will learn the use of computer software for imputation of item missing data and variance estimation in the analysis of complex sample survey data.

Prerequisite: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods, familiarity with basic sample design concepts, and data analytic techniques such as linear and logistic regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 115 – Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 4 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques 8 weeks, June 3-July 26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 4 credit hours (continues in second session) Coordinator: James Lepkowski, University of Michigan

You must be enrolled in the Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians (SPSS) to take this class.

The use of sound sample design is essential for surveys to yield estimates that have good properties – unbiased and precise, for example. Application of sampling techniques in sample design requires both an understanding of sampling principles and an opportunity to apply them. The Workshop in Sampling Techniques, a companion to Methods in Survey Sampling, is the course where students have an opportunity to apply techniques. Workshop participants acquire basic skills in sample selection techniques in a series of exercises which use frames and other materials drawn from the instructors' practice. Exercises include sampling distributions, selection techniques using microcomputers, area sampling, stratification, listing and segmenting in area sampling, telephone sampling methods, and weighting to compensate for unequal probabilities of selection and unit nonresponse. Workshop sessions will cover household sample designs in several developing countries, school and student sampling in the state of Michigan, and SRC's area sample of the United States. The workshop includes classroom sessions as well as computer laboratory sessions on Windows based microcomputers. The workshop instructors include James Lepkowski, Colm O'Muircheartaigh, Trivellore Raghunathan, Al Hermalin, and Steve Heeringa.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and simultaneous enrollment in Methods of Survey Sampling and Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. Participants seeking enrollment must also complete the special Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 116 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credit. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Patricia A Berglund

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Patricia Berglund, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data II must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data II.

This course is a computer laboratory accompanying Analysis of Survey Data II. Students taking Computer Analysis of Survey Data II will benefit from the development of skills in the use of computer statistical packages that can obtain results for methods discussed in Analysis of Survey Data II. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course will cover file preparation and manipulation, exploring data structure preparatory to index construction, index construction and evaluation, bivariate and multivariate regression analyses, logistic regression analysis, and contingency table analysis. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 117 – Event History Calendar Interviewing Methodologies. SRC Summer Institute course video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Robert F Belli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Calendar Interviewing Methodologies 1 week, June 17-21, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Monday–Friday 1 credit hour Video Course Instructor: Robert Belli, University of Michigan

Event History Calendars (EHCs) have been shown to lead to higher quality survey retrospective reports in comparison to traditional standardized question-list (Q-list) methods, without increasing interviewing time. This course will review the evidence concerning the benefits of EHCs, the cognitive theory that supports their ability to maximize the quality of retrospective reports, using EHCs in face-to-face and telephone modes, and within paper and computer-assisted instruments. Examples will concentrate on the collection of various types of social, economic, and health events, with reference periods that vary from relatively short durations (e.g., months to several years) to a lifetime review. Comparisons between EHCs and Q-lists regarding the verbal behaviors of interviewers and respondents also will be examined.

Prerequisite: An introductory course on questionnaire design, or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 118 – Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-26.

Instructor(s): David Morgan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research 2 weeks, July 15-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: David Morgan, Portland State University

This course will cover the design and execution of research projects using focus groups. The course will emphasize four basic topics: 1) how to design projects using focus groups, including issues involved in the selection and recruitment of participants; 2) how to write interview guides; 3) how to moderate focus groups; and 4) how to analyze the data from focus groups. For each of these four topics, the variety of options that are available will be presented, followed by a discussion on how to evaluate these options for your particular research purpose.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 119 – Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 15-19.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 15-19, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The course begins with a history of small-area estimation and different uses of small-area statistics in both public and private sectors. Students will learn various direct and indirect small-area estimation methods (both traditional and model-based). Different methods will be explained using simple examples. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic, but to provide an overview of small-area estimation. The course is intended for quantitatively oriented students. Formulas will be presented wherever necessary to explain some of the advanced topics but without any derivations. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: An introductory calculus-level statistics course and a course on regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 121 – Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing . SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 1-12.

Instructor(s): Nancy Riley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing 2 weeks, July 1-12, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Nancy E. Riley, Bowdoin College

This course will focus on semi-structured, or in-depth, interviewing methodologies. The course will cover the goals, assumptions, process, and uses of interviewing. We will compare these methods to other related qualitative and quantitative methods in order to review strategies for choosing the appropriate mix of methods in light of research goals. The course will cover interviewing techniques, including how to decide who to interview and how to conduct successful interviews; students will conduct interviews, and discuss the process and outcome of those interviews. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of this methodology, particularly through discussion of some of the critiques of these methods (from feminist researchers and others).

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 122 – Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers . SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-26.

Instructor(s): Eben Weitzman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers 2 weeks, July 15-26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily (during the 2nd week, July 22-26, the course will meet 1:00-5:00 pm for a computer lab) 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Eben Weitzman, University of Massachusetts Boston

This course builds upon the topics taught in the qualitative methods courses, An Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research, Ethnography: Introduction and Overview, and Qualitative Methods: Semi-structured Interviewing. Once qualitative data have been collected, the researcher is faced with the (often daunting) task of making sense of it all. In this two-week course, participants will learn methods for organizing, interpreting, and drawing and verifying conclusions from qualitative data. Our approach throughout will be active, participatory, and engaged with real data. As there is a wide variety of software available to assist the researcher in managing and analyzing qualitative data, we will become familiar with some of the options and, more importantly, learn how to make intelligent, individualized selections of software that best meet the needs of a particular researcher faced with a particular project. We will apply what we learn to the analysis of real data, as we use selected software to enter, summarize, and code data collected in the previous qualitative methods courses, ending in a research report. Students who have qualitative research projects of their own, such as dissertations, may bring a sample of their data on diskette. There will be an opportunity for students in this situation to choose software for their own projects, and take some early steps in analysis. During the second week of the course, there will be a mandatory lab session held 1:00-5:00 p.m. every weekday for all participants to become familiar with relevant software.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in qualitative research methods (e.g. the previous courses in this sequence), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 123 – Model Based Small Area Estimation and Related Topics. SRC Summer Institute videocourse. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Model Based Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 22-26, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Model-based small-area estimation has received considerable importance over the past two decades. Students will learn the state-of-the-art model-based small-area estimation methods (e.g., empirical best prediction, empirical Bayes and hierarchical Bayes, etc. ) and the associated important issues regarding measures of uncertainty, model selection, model diagnostics, design-consistency, etc. The bootstrap, jackknife, and delta methods will be discussed in details in the context of measuring uncertainty of EB/EBP. In order to explain certain concepts, it will be necessary to go through a few derivations. Data analyses using several real life examples will be presented. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: A Master's degree in Statistics or another quantitative field is needed, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 124 – Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Nora Cate Schaeffer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction 1 week, June 24-28, 9:00 am-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Nora Cate Schaeffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This course provides an introductory overview of the issues that arise in writing questions for interviewer-administered surveys. We will examine the logic of measurement in standardized survey interviews, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about events and behaviors, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about attitudes and evaluations, and some techniques for testing questions. The focus is on showing how the findings from research can be applied to solving problems that routinely arise in writing survey questions. Class exercises and assignments will provide experience in solving practical problems. Most of the examples and research presented will focus on interviewer-administered interviews, but most of the principles and some of the solutions covered in the course are also relevant for self-administered instruments.

Prerequisite: Basic understanding of the goals and methods of survey research using standardized interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 126 – Web Survey Implementation. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Scott D Crawford

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Implementation 1 week, July 8-12, 3:00p.m.-6:00 p.m. daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Scott Crawford, MSInteractive, L.L.C.

The course will focus on the practical implementation of web surveys. We will trace the process that begins with a questionnaire and follow it through creating a survey, selecting sample, administering the survey, and processing the results. Survey design software will be discussed, including a review of the major types of software, available capabilities, and cost implications. Examples of survey design software will be shown. When possible, discussions will relate to the implementation of survey designs presented in the Web Survey Design course. Students will learn how to effectively manage web based data collections with regards to survey process, survey quality, and survey design. Specific issues relating to implementing web surveys as part of a multi-mode data collection will also be discussed. This course will not focus on the methodological design decisions involved in creating web surveys. Also, while some web survey systems will be used in a hands on setting, and basic instruction will be provided on their use, due to time constraints, students should not expect to master any web survey systems as part of this course.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. Students should have a basic understanding of computers and programming logic, however, no specific programming experience is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 127 – Building and Testing Structual Equation Models. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Amiram Vinokur

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Building and Testing Structual Equation Models 4 weeks, July 1-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Amiram Vinokur, University of Michigan

Since the early 80's, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analyses, first using LISREL and later using EQS, and AMOS user-friendly software packages, have gained prominence as they replace the older traditional analytic methods of factor and path analysis. SEM merges confirmatory factor analysis with path analysis and provides means for constructing, testing, and comparing comprehensive structural path models as well as comparing the goodness of fit of models and their adequacy across multiple groups (samples). This course will cover the conceptual and technical issues of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Following the presentation of major conceptual issues, five basic structural models will be described in detail. The models vary from simple to more complex ones. They also cover a wide range of situations including longitudinal and mediational analyses, comparisons between groups, and analyses that include data from different sources such as from parents, teachers, and children. The description and discussion of the models will provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply SEM techniques using EQS software for analyzing, evaluating, and reporting results produced by this analytic method. This knowledge is easily transferable to the use of LISREL or AMOS software. Course work will require students to construct and test a structural model using their own data, or data from available data sets, and produce a paper that reports their analysis and conclusions.

Prerequisite: One or more courses in statistics that included in-depth treatment of linear regression analysis, basic knowledge of the concepts of item analysis and internal reliability, and some familiarity with factor analysis. At least some hands-on experience with data analysis using SPSS, SAS, or similar software for data analysis is also required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 129 – Data Collection Methods. SRC Summer Institute video course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Robert M Groves , David Cantor

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Data Collection Methods PLEASE NOTE: there has been a time change 8 weeks, June 4-July 26, 4:15-7:00 pm Tuesdays & Thursdays; June 25th and 27th the course will meet 5:15 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: David Cantor, Weststat, Inc.; Robert Groves, University of Michigan

This course reviews alternative data collection methods used in surveys, focusing on interviewer-administered methods. It concentrates on the impact these techniques have on the quality of survey data, including measurement error properties, nonresponse, and coverage errors. The course reviews the literature on data collection methods, focusing on comparisons of major modes (face-to-face, telephone, and mail) and alternative methods of data collection (diaries, administrative records, direct observation, etc. ) The implications of mode decisions for data quality and the data collection process are discussed. Special attention is paid to the statistical and social science literatures on interviewer effects and nonresponse. Current advances in computer-assisted survey information collection (including CATI, CAPI, TDE, and VRE) will be reviewed. This is not a how-to-do-it course on survey data collection, but rather focuses on the error properties of key aspects of the data collection process.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Spring/Summer Term Courses


PSYCH 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 616 / SOC 616. Analysis of Survey Data.

Section 001 – Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Michael Couper , Marc A Musick

Prerequisites: Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics, or an instructor approved equivalent, working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and basic familiarity with survey methods (Psych. 613/Soc. 510 or Psych.684/Soc.614). (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Mick P. Couper, University of Michigan
Survey data have features that differ from data generated from other types of data collection methods. This course provides participants with an overview of the nature of those features and an introduction to methods that properly handle the unique features of survey data. The course begins with a brief overview of survey design and its implications for analysis, and then covers the logic and methods of analysis, measurement theory and evaluation, scaling and index construction, contingency table analysis, and linear and logistic regression methods for bivariate and multivariate models. Logistic regression is extended to incorporate multinomial and ordered logit types of models. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods taught in this course using computer software is taught in the companion course, Computer Analysis of Survey Data II. Prerequisites: (1) Completion of at least one graduate course in statistics or an instructor approved equivalent, (2) working familiarity with statistics through product moment correlation and analysis of variance, and (3) basic familiarity with survey methods. A self-diagnostic examination is available to assess whether students have adequate skills for this course. Please click here to download the diagnostic as an Adobe .pdf file. Please e-mail your answers to summers@isr.umich.edu. We will respond with your score and our recommendations about your preparation for the course. All students electing this course are strongly encouraged to complete the examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 619. Supervised Research I.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Known as the "First Year 6l9 Research Project." This is an individual instruction course; when enrolling for 6l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 687 / SOC 612. Methods of Survey Sampling.

Section 001 – SRC SUMMER INSTITUTE VIDEO COURSE. 8 WEEKS, 3 CREDITS. MEETS JUNE 4 - JULY 27.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 612.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 688 / SOC 688. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 001 – Introduction to Survey Research Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 6 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Sue Ellen Hansen , Maria Krysan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Introductory psychology and statistics and permission of instructor; Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, but not required. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Research Techniques 8 weeks, June 3- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 6 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructors: Maria Krysan, University of Illinois–Chicago; Sue Ellen Hansen, University of Michigan

This eight-week course will acquaint students with the theory and practice of survey research broadly defined as research that relies upon face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, or self-administered questionnaires as a primary means of data collection. The course involves lectures, readings, and discussions covering the basics of the major stages of a survey, including hypothesis and problem formulation, study design, sampling, questionnaire and interview design and evaluation, techniques of interviewing, code development and coding of data, data cleaning and management, data analysis, and report writing. Students will gain practical experience in these areas through the development and implementation of a survey. Participants are encouraged to bring materials related to their own research interests.

Prerequisite: Some familiarity with survey research methods is helpful, although not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 706. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 711 / SOC 711. Questionnaire Design.

Section 001 – Questionnaire Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Pamela Campanelli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questionnaire Design 4 weeks, June 3-28, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Pamela Campanelli, Survey Methods Consultant

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research, exploring the theoretical issues that arise in their development, application and interpretation as well as the practical aspects of questionnaire design that are often not taught in formal courses. The emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing both factual and non-factual material using survey questions. Topics include cognitive guidelines for question construction to ensure respondent understanding, techniques for measuring the occurrence of past behaviors and events, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on responses, an introduction to the psychometric perspectives in question scale design, combining individual questions into a meaningful questionnaire, special guidelines for self-completion surveys versus interview surveys, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and an introduction to techniques for testing survey questions. There will be exercises both in and outside of class that will lead to the development of a class questionnaire which will then be tested. Students' choice of questionnaire topic will be constrained by the ability to locally interview individuals who match the topic's target population.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 719. Supervised Research II.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 7l9, students must use the individual section number of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 779. Practicum in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 676 and 677 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit.

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 819. Supervised Research III.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 879. Internship in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Psych. 779 and permission of practicum supervisor. (1-4). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 001 – Statistical Analysis with Missing Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Trivellore E Raghunathan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Statistical Analysis with Missing Data 1 week, July 22-26, 6:00-9:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Trivellore E. Raghunathan, University of Michigan

Missing data is a pervasive problem faced by many analysts. This course will discuss several approaches and methods for analyzing data with missing values. The course will be offered at an advanced statistical level and include: a discussion of ignorable and nonignorable missing data mechanisms; unit nonresponse adjustments through weighting and post-stratification; multiple imputation for item nonresponse; and maximum likelihood with incomplete data. Methods for nonignorable missing data mechansim including selection models, pattern-mixture models, informative censoring models. Several software options for analyzing data with missing values will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: Advanced practical and technical knowledge of standard statistical distributions and models for complete data, e.g., normal linear model, loglinear model for contingency tables, logistic regression models, and basic understanding of the method of maximum likelihood.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 002 – Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute video course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Valerie E Lee , Robert G Croninger

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Multi-level Analysis of Survey Data 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am- 12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Valerie Lee, University of Michigan; Robert Croninger, University of Maryland

Although many surveys gather data on multiple units of analysis (e.g., individuals, the groups or organizations in which individuals participate, the same measures taken over multiple time periods), most statistical procedures cannot make full use of data with this nested structure: individuals nested within groups, measures nested within individuals, and other nesting levels that may be of analytic interest. In this course, students are introduced to an increasingly common statistical technique, hierarchical linear modeling (HLM). Multi-level methods and the HLM software can (and should be) used to analyze nested data and multi-level research questions. Although the course demonstrates multiple uses of the HLM software, including growth-curve modeling, the major focus is on the investigation of organizational effects on individual-level outcomes. Although we use, for instructional purposes, data drawn from a nationally representative sample of U.S. elementary schools, students, and teachers, the multi-level analysis skills taught in this course are equally applicable in many social science fields: sociology, public health, psychology, demography, political science, and in the general field of organizational theory. Typically the course enrolls students from all these fields. Students will learn to conceptualize, conduct, interpret, and write up their own multi-level analyses, as well as to understand relevant statistical and practical issues.

Prerequisites: At least one graduate-level course in statistics or quantitative methods, and experience with multivariate regression models, including both analysis of data and interpretation of results.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 003 – Analysis of Survey Data I. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data I 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Research in the social sciences has increasingly come to rely on statistical concepts in the development and evaluation of research designs, as well as in the presentation and analysis of data. The application of a wide variety of research designs, including both experimental and non-experimental designs, requires real understanding of fundamental statistical concepts. This course provides an introduction to the relationship between research design and statistical analysis. Its main objective is the conceptual understanding of statistical reasoning rather than the rote application of statistical formulae. The course begins with a broad overview of research designs frequently used by survey researchers. It then focuses upon estimation of sampling error, sampling design, and sampling distributions of sums, means, and percents for simple random samples. In the second half of the course, data analytic techniques most commonly used in the context of these research designs are presented (t-tests, correlation analysis, and regression analysis). Additional topics include: normal approximations, measurement error, hypothesis testing, probability samples, and calculating sample size for specified precision levels.

Prerequisite: Mathematics through college algebra.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 004 – Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu) , Michael Schober

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Cognition, Communication and Survey Measurement 4 weeks, June 3-28, 10:30 am-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Norbert Schwarz, University of Michigan; Michael Schober, New School University

Survey data are only as meaningful as the answers that respondents provide. Hence, the processes that underlie respondents' answers are of crucial importance. This course draws on current theorizing in cognitive and social psychology pertaining to issues like language comprehension, information storage and retrieval, autobiographical memory, and social judgment to understand how respondents make sense of the questions asked and arrive at an answer. Of particular interest are the implications of cognitive and communicative processes for data quality and questionnaire construction. The applied topics covered include question wording and comprehension; the impact of response alternatives on respondents' answers; the emergence of question order and context effects in attitude measurement; and the processes that affect the validity of retrospective behavioral reports. Throughout, we explore factors that may potentially bias reports, as well as factors that are likely to improve data quality.

Prerequisite: Some background in psychology is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 005 – Introduction to Questionnaire Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 10-14.

Instructor(s): Barbel Knauper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Questionnaire Design 1 week, June 10-14, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Bärbel Knäuper, McGill University

This course focuses on the design of questionnaires used in survey research and the practical issues that arise in their development, application, and interpretation. The major emphasis is on the selection of appropriate measurement techniques for assessing attitudes, opinions, behaviors, events, factual material, subjective experiences and self-assessments using survey questions. Topics include: unstructured vs. structured interviews, open-ended vs. fixed-response forms, the effects of question wording, response formats, and question sequence on survey responses, strategies for obtaining sensitive or personal information, and techniques for identifying and revising problematic questions. The course will provide practical recommendations for how to develop survey questionnaires. The workshop involves lectures, discussions, and exercises. The homework assignments are intended to offer practical experience by critiquing existing questionnaires and by developing new questions. Participants are strongly encouraged to e-mail question or questionnaire examples from their own work to the instructor a week before the beginning of the course (bknauper@psych.mcgill.ca).

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 006 – Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu) , Marc A Musick

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 8:30-10:30 am daily 3 credit hours Instructors: Jim Lepkowski, University of Michigan; Marc Musick, University of Texas

The analysis of data requires a broad understanding of how data are structured and how different statistical methods can and should be applied to data. Analysts have a wide variety of statistical methods to choose from, but they must understand the basic premise of the method and the fundamental assumptions which must be met for application to be valid. Analysis of Survey Data III is a continuation of Analysis of Survey Data II (although prepared students may take this course without having completed Analysis of Survey Data II, after taking a diagnostic exam). The course concentrates on widely used methods for the analysis of survey data. Before considering those analytic methods, the course examines the likelihood principle and the associated estimation and testing procedures that follow from it. The principle and methods of maximum likelihood estimation and likelihood test procedures are then applied to methods developed in Analysis of Survey Data II, and extended to additional methods such as Tobit regression, Poisson and negative binomial regression, mixed effects analysis of variance models, simple path models, factor analysis, and structural equation models. Several multivariate analysis methods such as multivariate regression and analysis of variance are also examined. The course concludes with an examination of weighting, imputation, and variance estimation in complex sample designs. Homework and examination problems emphasize conceptual issues in each topic. The focus is on choosing appropriate statistical tools for analysis and on interpretation of results. Application of methods in lecture uses SAS, SPSS, Stata, LISREL, and IVEware. Use of SAS, LISREL, and IVEware is taught in the companion Computer Analysis of Survey Data III.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of Analysis of Survey Data II, an instructor-approved equivalent, or satisfactory performance on the course diagnostic exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 007 – Evaluation Research Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): William H Yeaton

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Evaluation Research Design 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-5:00 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: William Yeaton, Evaluation Consultant

Studies of the highest quality require the strongest possible research design. This course provides various ways in which inference can be strengthened in those research contexts for which random assignment is not possible due to real-world constraints. Focus will be placed upon practical design and measurement strategies rather than on statistical analysis. Especially important among the methods presented are design procedures aimed to enhance one's ability to make causal inference and to generalize results. Methodological tactics for eliminating threats to validity will be emphasized using examples from a variety of disciplines including public health, education, political science, sociology, psychology, social work, and business. Studies combining both experiments and surveys will be included. Principles that establish causal inference will be illustrated in a wide range of observational designs (e.g., non-equivalent control group, pretest-posttest, time-series, cohort, case-control, regression-discontinuity, patched-up, reversal, multiple baseline, and case study) most commonly found in those disciplines. Recent developments in meta-analysis will be discussed in the context of inferences that cannot be made within single studies. The course should prove particularly useful for graduate students and researchers who are actively planning research, since feedback from the instructor and other students will allow them to improve their proposed studies.

Prerequisite: Knowledge of introductory statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 008 – Event History Analysis. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 2 credits. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Jay Teachman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Analysis 1 week, June 17-21, 9:00 am-4:00 pm daily 2 credit hours Instructor: Jay Teachman, Western Washington University

The use of event history data, recording the timing and duration of life experiences, has become common in the social sciences. The application of conventional analysis tools to event histories can produce severe bias or loss of information. This course shows how these difficulties can be overcome, enabling the analyst to realize the full benefit of event history data. The emphasis is on "regression-like" models, commonly known as proportional hazards models or hazard-rate models, in which the rate of an event occurring varies according to a set of explanatory variables. Topics will include data structures, life tables, censoring, discrete-time models, parametric models, nonparametric models, time-varying explanatory variables, unobserved heterogeneity, competing risks, and repeatable events.

Prerequisite: One graduate-level course in statistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 010 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data III. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): John Van Hoewyk

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data III 4 weeks, July 1-26, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hours Instructor: John Van Hoewyk, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data III must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data III.

This course is a computer laboratory designed to accompany Analysis of Survey Data III. It emphasizes the use of computer statistical packages to obtain results related to topics discussed in Analysis of Survey Data III. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course provides practical experience in all methods discussed in the companion course using SAS, LISREL, and IVEware in the University of Michigan computing environment. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data III.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 011 – Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credit. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Barber , Lisa D Pearce (lisapear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Introduction and Overview 2 weeks, July 1-12, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Jennifer Barber, University of Michigan; Lisa Pearce, University of Michigan

In this course, participants will become familiar with multiple methods of data collection and how they can be combined within a single research project. The methods of focus will be unstructured or in-depth interviews, focus groups, participant observation, archival research, and survey interviews. Emphasis will be placed on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and we will focus on how each different method can contribute to the research question in unique ways. This course is designed for those with a specific research question in mind, but who are new to collecting data (or new to multi-method approaches to collecting data). Throughout the course, participants will be asked to design and present multi-method approaches to a research question of their choice. By the end of this module, participants will have an overview of multi-method research that will enable them to design, understand, and evaluate multi-method approaches within a single project.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 012 – Introduction to Survey Quality. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Paul Biemer , Lars Lyberg

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Survey Quality 1 week, June 24-28, 1:00-5:00 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Video Course Instructors: Paul Biemer, Research Triangle Institute; Lars Lyberg, Statistics Sweden

This one-week course will span a range of topics dealing with the quality of data collected through the survey process. The course begins with discussion of total survey error, as measured by the mean squared error, and its relationship to survey costs and general quality dimensions such as timeliness, coherence, and accessibility. Then the major sources of error in surveys are discussed in some detail, including (a) the origins of each error source (i.e., its root causes), (b) the most successful methods as we know them for reducing the errors emanating from these error sources, and (c) methods that are most often used in practice for evaluating the effects of the sources on total survey error. The course will expose participants to concepts and ideas for understanding the nature of survey error, techniques for improving survey quality, and, where possible, their cost implications, and methods for evaluating data quality in ongoing survey programs. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic but rather as an introduction to the field of survey quality.

Prerequisite: Some prior research experience is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 013 – Web Survey Design. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Mick Couper

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Design 1 week, July 8-12, 9:00 a.m.-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Mick Couper, University of Michigan

The course will focus on the design of web survey instruments and procedures, based on theories of human-computer interaction, interface design, and research on self-administered questionnaires and computer-assisted interviewing. The course will begin with a review of web or Internet surveys in the general context of sources of survey error (sampling, coverage, nonresponse, measurement error, and costs). The course will then discuss different approaches to web survey design (e.g., static versus interactive) and discuss various design approaches for developing effective web surveys. The course will draw on empirical results from experiments on alternative design approaches as well as practical experience in the design and implementation of web surveys. The course will not focus on the technical aspects of web survey implementation, such as hardware, software, or programming. These will be covered in the companion course, Web Survey Implementation, taught by Scott Crawford.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. A working knowledge of survey research methods will be assumed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 014 – Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Steven G Heeringa

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data 8 weeks, June 4- July 26, 10:30 am-12:30 pm Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays 3 credit hours (continues in second session) Instructor: Steven Heeringa, University of Michigan

This is an advanced course on the analysis of survey data from complex sample designs covering methods for incorporating weighting, stratification, and clustering in estimation and inference for a wide variety of statistical analysis techniques. Alternative variance estimation procedures for statistics such as means, proportions, and percentiles as well as the coefficients of linear, logistic, and loglinear regression models will be discussed, as will methods for handling missing data arising from both unit and item nonresponse. Tuesday and Thursday lectures and discussions will cover each of the major topics in-depth. Friday computer laboratory sessions will include exercises with actual survey data to illustrate the methods covered in the class. Students will learn the use of computer software for imputation of item missing data and variance estimation in the analysis of complex sample survey data.

Prerequisite: Two graduate-level courses in statistical methods, familiarity with basic sample design concepts, and data analytic techniques such as linear and logistic regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 015 – Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques. SRC Summer Institute course. 8 weeks, 4 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): James M Lepkowski (jimlep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Workshop in Survey Sampling Techniques 8 weeks, June 3-July 26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily 4 credit hours (continues in second session) Coordinator: James Lepkowski, University of Michigan

You must be enrolled in the Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians (SPSS) to take this class.

The use of sound sample design is essential for surveys to yield estimates that have good properties – unbiased and precise, for example. Application of sampling techniques in sample design requires both an understanding of sampling principles and an opportunity to apply them. The Workshop in Sampling Techniques, a companion to Methods in Survey Sampling, is the course where students have an opportunity to apply techniques. Workshop participants acquire basic skills in sample selection techniques in a series of exercises which use frames and other materials drawn from the instructors' practice. Exercises include sampling distributions, selection techniques using microcomputers, area sampling, stratification, listing and segmenting in area sampling, telephone sampling methods, and weighting to compensate for unequal probabilities of selection and unit nonresponse. Workshop sessions will cover household sample designs in several developing countries, school and student sampling in the state of Michigan, and SRC's area sample of the United States. The workshop includes classroom sessions as well as computer laboratory sessions on Windows based microcomputers. The workshop instructors include James Lepkowski, Colm O'Muircheartaigh, Trivellore Raghunathan, Al Hermalin, and Steve Heeringa.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and simultaneous enrollment in Methods of Survey Sampling and Analysis of Complex Sample Survey Data. Participants seeking enrollment must also complete the special Sampling Program for Survey Statisticians application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 016 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 1 credit. Meets June 3-28.

Instructor(s): Patricia A Berglund

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Computer Analysis of Survey Data II 4 weeks, June 3-28, 3:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Patricia Berglund, University of Michigan

Students enrolled in Computer Analysis of Survey Data II must also be enrolled in Analysis of Survey Data II.

This course is a computer laboratory accompanying Analysis of Survey Data II. Students taking Computer Analysis of Survey Data II will benefit from the development of skills in the use of computer statistical packages that can obtain results for methods discussed in Analysis of Survey Data II. Particular attention will be paid to manipulating software and interpretation of results. The course will cover file preparation and manipulation, exploring data structure preparatory to index construction, index construction and evaluation, bivariate and multivariate regression analyses, logistic regression analysis, and contingency table analysis. The SAS statistical software system will be used, but students do not need to be familiar with SAS in order to take the course. The SAS Assist system is used to introduce students to SAS, and eases the task of using the system. SAS is one of several languages that can be used to obtain results discussed in the companion course.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in Analysis of Survey Data II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 017 – Computer Analysis of Survey Data II. SRC Summer Institute course video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 17-21.

Instructor(s): Robert F Belli

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Event History Calendar Interviewing Methodologies 1 week, June 17-21, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Monday–Friday 1 credit hour Video Course Instructor: Robert Belli, University of Michigan

Event History Calendars (EHCs) have been shown to lead to higher quality survey retrospective reports in comparison to traditional standardized question-list (Q-list) methods, without increasing interviewing time. This course will review the evidence concerning the benefits of EHCs, the cognitive theory that supports their ability to maximize the quality of retrospective reports, using EHCs in face-to-face and telephone modes, and within paper and computer-assisted instruments. Examples will concentrate on the collection of various types of social, economic, and health events, with reference periods that vary from relatively short durations (e.g., months to several years) to a lifetime review. Comparisons between EHCs and Q-lists regarding the verbal behaviors of interviewers and respondents also will be examined.

Prerequisite: An introductory course on questionnaire design, or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 018 – Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-26.

Instructor(s): David Morgan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research 2 weeks, July 15-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: David Morgan, Portland State University

This course will cover the design and execution of research projects using focus groups. The course will emphasize four basic topics: 1) how to design projects using focus groups, including issues involved in the selection and recruitment of participants; 2) how to write interview guides; 3) how to moderate focus groups; and 4) how to analyze the data from focus groups. For each of these four topics, the variety of options that are available will be presented, followed by a discussion on how to evaluate these options for your particular research purpose.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 019 – Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics. SRC Summer Institute video course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 15-19.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Introduction to Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 15-19, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The course begins with a history of small-area estimation and different uses of small-area statistics in both public and private sectors. Students will learn various direct and indirect small-area estimation methods (both traditional and model-based). Different methods will be explained using simple examples. The course is not designed to provide an in-depth study of any topic, but to provide an overview of small-area estimation. The course is intended for quantitatively oriented students. Formulas will be presented wherever necessary to explain some of the advanced topics but without any derivations. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: An introductory calculus-level statistics course and a course on regression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 021 – Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 1-12.

Instructor(s): Nancy Riley

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Methods: Semi-Structured Interviewing 2 weeks, July 1-12, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. daily 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Nancy E. Riley, Bowdoin College

This course will focus on semi-structured, or in-depth, interviewing methodologies. The course will cover the goals, assumptions, process, and uses of interviewing. We will compare these methods to other related qualitative and quantitative methods in order to review strategies for choosing the appropriate mix of methods in light of research goals. The course will cover interviewing techniques, including how to decide who to interview and how to conduct successful interviews; students will conduct interviews, and discuss the process and outcome of those interviews. We will examine the strengths and weaknesses of this methodology, particularly through discussion of some of the critiques of these methods (from feminist researchers and others).

Prerequisites: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 022 – Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers. SRC Summer Institute course. 2 weeks, 1.5 credits. Meets July 15-27.

Instructor(s): Eben Weitzman

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Qualitative Data Analysis: With and Without the Use of Computers 2 weeks, July 15-26, 1:00-3:00 pm daily (during the 2nd week, July 22-26, the course will meet 1:00-5:00 pm for a computer lab) 1.5 credit hours Instructor: Eben Weitzman, University of Massachusetts Boston

This course builds upon the topics taught in the qualitative methods courses, An Introduction to Focus Groups as Qualitative Research, Ethnography: Introduction and Overview, and Qualitative Methods: Semi-structured Interviewing. Once qualitative data have been collected, the researcher is faced with the (often daunting) task of making sense of it all. In this two-week course, participants will learn methods for organizing, interpreting, and drawing and verifying conclusions from qualitative data. Our approach throughout will be active, participatory, and engaged with real data. As there is a wide variety of software available to assist the researcher in managing and analyzing qualitative data, we will become familiar with some of the options and, more importantly, learn how to make intelligent, individualized selections of software that best meet the needs of a particular researcher faced with a particular project. We will apply what we learn to the analysis of real data, as we use selected software to enter, summarize, and code data collected in the previous qualitative methods courses, ending in a research report. Students who have qualitative research projects of their own, such as dissertations, may bring a sample of their data on diskette. There will be an opportunity for students in this situation to choose software for their own projects, and take some early steps in analysis. During the second week of the course, there will be a mandatory lab session held 1:00-5:00 p.m. every weekday for all participants to become familiar with relevant software.

Prerequisites: An introductory course in qualitative research methods (e.g. the previous courses in this sequence), or permission of instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 023 – Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction. SRC Summer Institute videocourse. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 22-26.

Instructor(s): Partha Lahiri

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Model Based Small Area Estimation and Related Topics 1 week, July 22-26, 1:00-4:00 pm daily 1 credit hour; Video Course Instructor: Partha Lahiri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Model-based small-area estimation has received considerable importance over the past two decades. Students will learn the stat – of – the-art model-based small-area estimation methods (e.g., empirical best prediction, empirical Bayes and hierarchical Bayes, etc. ) and the associated important issues regarding measures of uncertainty, model selection, model diagnostics, design-consistency, etc. The bootstrap, jackknife, and delta methods will be discussed in details in the context of measuring uncertainty of EB/EBP. In order to explain certain concepts, it will be necessary to go through a few derivations. Data analyses using several real life examples will be presented. Application of SAS and BUGS in certain small-area data analyses will be shown. The course includes practical exercises.

Prerequisites: A Master's degree in Statistics or another quantitative field is needed, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 024 – Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets June 24-28.

Instructor(s): Nora Cate Schaeffer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Questions for Interviewer-Administered Surveys: An Introduction 1 week, June 24-28, 9:00 am-noon daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Nora Cate Schaeffer, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This course provides an introductory overview of the issues that arise in writing questions for interviewer-administered surveys. We will examine the logic of measurement in standardized survey interviews, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about events and behaviors, the decisions that must be made in writing questions about attitudes and evaluations, and some techniques for testing questions. The focus is on showing how the findings from research can be applied to solving problems that routinely arise in writing survey questions. Class exercises and assignments will provide experience in solving practical problems. Most of the examples and research presented will focus on interviewer-administered interviews, but most of the principles and some of the solutions covered in the course are also relevant for self-administered instruments.

Prerequisite: Basic understanding of the goals and methods of survey research using standardized interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 026 – Web Survey Implementation. SRC Summer Institute course. 1 week, 1 credit. Meets July 8-12.

Instructor(s): Scott D Crawford

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Web Survey Implementation 1 week, July 8-12, 3:00p.m.-6:00 p.m. daily 1 credit hour Instructor: Scott Crawford, MSInteractive, L.L.C.

The course will focus on the practical implementation of web surveys. We will trace the process that begins with a questionnaire and follow it through creating a survey, selecting sample, administering the survey, and processing the results. Survey design software will be discussed, including a review of the major types of software, available capabilities, and cost implications. Examples of survey design software will be shown. When possible, discussions will relate to the implementation of survey designs presented in the Web Survey Design course. Students will learn how to effectively manage web based data collections with regards to survey process, survey quality, and survey design. Specific issues relating to implementing web surveys as part of a multi-mode data collection will also be discussed. This course will not focus on the methodological design decisions involved in creating web surveys. Also, while some web survey systems will be used in a hands on setting, and basic instruction will be provided on their use, due to time constraints, students should not expect to master any web survey systems as part of this course.

Prerequisite: Basic coursework in social science research methods, including survey research. Students should have a basic understanding of computers and programming logic, however, no specific programming experience is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 027 – Building and Testing Structual Equation Models. SRC Summer Institute course. 4 weeks, 3 credits. Meets July 1-26.

Instructor(s): Amiram Vinokur

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Building and Testing Structual Equation Models 4 weeks, July 1-26, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 pm daily 3 credit hours Instructor: Amiram Vinokur, University of Michigan

Since the early 80's, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) analyses, first using LISREL and later using EQS, and AMOS user-friendly software packages, have gained prominence as they replace the older traditional analytic methods of factor and path analysis. SEM merges confirmatory factor analysis with path analysis and provides means for constructing, testing, and comparing comprehensive structural path models as well as comparing the goodness of fit of models and their adequacy across multiple groups (samples). This course will cover the conceptual and technical issues of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Following the presentation of major conceptual issues, five basic structural models will be described in detail. The models vary from simple to more complex ones. They also cover a wide range of situations including longitudinal and mediational analyses, comparisons between groups, and analyses that include data from different sources such as from parents, teachers, and children. The description and discussion of the models will provide students with the knowledge and skills to apply SEM techniques using EQS software for analyzing, evaluating, and reporting results produced by this analytic method. This knowledge is easily transferable to the use of LISREL or AMOS software. Course work will require students to construct and test a structural model using their own data, or data from available data sets, and produce a paper that reports their analysis and conclusions.

Prerequisite: One or more courses in statistics that included in-depth treatment of linear regression analysis, basic knowledge of the concepts of item analysis and internal reliability, and some familiarity with factor analysis. At least some hands-on experience with data analysis using SPSS, SAS, or similar software for data analysis is also required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 988 / SOC 988. Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology.

Section 029 – Data Collection Methods. SRC Summer Institute video course. 8 weeks, 3 credits. Meets June 3-July 26.

Instructor(s): Robert M Groves , David Cantor

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-5). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/si

Data Collection Methods PLEASE NOTE: there has been a time change 8 weeks, June 4-July 26, 4:15-7:00 pm Tuesdays & Thursdays; June 25th and 27th the course will meet 5:15 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 3 credit hours Video Course Instructors: David Cantor, Weststat, Inc.; Robert Groves, University of Michigan

This course reviews alternative data collection methods used in surveys, focusing on interviewer-administered methods. It concentrates on the impact these techniques have on the quality of survey data, including measurement error properties, nonresponse, and coverage errors. The course reviews the literature on data collection methods, focusing on comparisons of major modes (face – to – face, telephone, and mail) and alternative methods of data collection (diaries, administrative records, direct observation, etc. ) The implications of mode decisions for data quality and the data collection process are discussed. Special attention is paid to the statistical and social science literatures on interviewer effects and nonresponse. Current advances in computer-assisted survey information collection (including CATI, CAPI, TDE, and VRE) will be reviewed. This is not a how-to-do-it course on survey data collection, but rather focuses on the error properties of key aspects of the data collection process.

Prerequisite: An introductory course in survey research methods or equivalent experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Undergraduate Course Listings for PSYCH.


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