College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in CAAS


This page was created at 9:00 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in CAAS
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CAAS

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for CAAS.


CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

CAAS 418/Poli. Sci. 419. Black Americans and the Political System.

African-American Studies

Section 001 Black Am & Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites: Two courses in political science. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 422/Anthro. 411. African Culture.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. AAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 448/Hist. 448. Africa Since 1850.

African Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 448.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAS 201 and 450 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 452. Education of the Black Child.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teshome G Wagaw (twagaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course deals with overlooked but crucial questions related to the education of Black children in the United States. The area of primary concern will be public schooling, and the emphasis will be laid on analyzing the social, cultural, political, and economic forces which act to influence the learning experiences of Black children. This course will thus consider, on the one hand, the theoretical framing of ideas about the growth, development, and learning of children in different life settings and styles, and, on the other, the existing structural, sociopolitical attempts to find ways and means of relating the philosophy and objectives of public education to the needs of Black children. In the process, this course examines the defects of present-day educational theories which are based on empirical data drawn from studies of less than 1% of the population. The course will test for the applicability and generalizability of such data to other population groups, examine their implications for different cultural systems, and assess what is thus contributed to cognitive variation and performance and competence in the learning process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 453. Culture, Class, and Conflict in Southern Africa.

African Studies

Section 001 Southern African Debates.

Instructor(s): Sinfree Makoni (smakoni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAS 200 recommended. (3). (African Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide participants with a sense of the current historical and social contexts of Southern Africa by exploring recent developments in social, political, economic, medical, and educational issues. The course will examine the impact of industrialization, labor migration, urbanization, nationalist political movements and the role of western medical system in current epidemics. A course pack will be provided which includes readings in the social, political, and health sciences, contemporary cinema and educational policy. The seminar will be complemented with a series of films, which enrich the lecture material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 454/Anthro. 453. African-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 457/Econ. 476. Political Economy of Black America.

African-American Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/476/001.nsf

This course will cover the economic history of Africans in America from the 15th century to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical roots of contemporary African-American life. Students will leave the class with well-informed opinions on the following topics: the contributions of African Americans to American economic development; the economic foundations and legacies of racial slavery in the United States; the economic significance and meaning of freedom and citizenship; the economic thought of African Americans; the economic structure of Jim Crow and the responses of African Americans to it; the economic causes and consequences of the Black migration to the north; the economics of the Civil Rights Movement; the changing class structure of the Black community; the economics of Black family structure; markets vs. the state in Black economic development; an accounting of contemporary Black economic resources; African Americans in the global economy; and economic strategies for the future.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Seminar in Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa. Meets with Psychology 401.005

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

When economists discuss the development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. "The Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa" is a seminar course that is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development.

Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 Life is a Performance, Part II.

Instructor(s): Olabayo Olaniyi (olabayo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Yoruba of West Africa believe the physical world (aye) to be a marketplace. People living in this marketplace (oja) are performers who assume various roles in order to navigate through life. Based on this Yoruba philosophical approach to life, "Life is a Performance, Part II" is a marketplace for students interested in performance. As a continuation of "Life is a Performance, Part I," students will perform in a variety of ways including dance, drumming, object making, masquerading and theater. The course will culminate in a large-scale, year-end performance in the University of Michigan Museum of Art. The performance entitled: "Ori: A Journey," will be constructed around the important Yoruba concept of "ori" or destiny. Students will also be involved in set design, installation, and costume making.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 477/NR&E 477. Women and the Environment.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). (Cross-Area Courses).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores issues related to gender, race, class and environmental inequality. It looks at the historical role of women in the environment in the U.S., explores the development of environmental ideologies, and looks at the relationship between women, environment, and social justice. It examines environmental sub-movements like ecofeminism and environmental justice. The course also examines gender and inequality in the international context. In particular, it focuses on women and development issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 486. Communication Media in the Black World: Print Media.

African-American Studies

Section 001 History of the African American Press. Meets with Communication Studies 458.001.

Instructor(s): Catherine A Squires (squiresc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~squiresc/pressyll.htm

This course gives students in-depth knowledge of the history of the African American press from the antebellum era to the present. Through readings, discussions, and short papers, students will investigate relationships between the Black press, Black political ideas and social movements, and mainstream news coverage of African Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 AFRICAN-AMERICAN SCIENCE FICTION. (1 credit). Meets March 6 April 5. (Drop/Add deadline=March 12).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Tucker (tckr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As contemporary readers continue to search for new and exciting types of writing, and as "cyberculture" becomes mainstream, the paraliterary genre of science fiction (SF) becomes increasingly relevant to scholars of American literature and culture. However, SF and African-American culture are frequently understood by both African Americans and the SF community as mutually exclusive. The history of the genre explains why some have seen only an absence of Black SF talent; however the history of Africans in America that of alien abductees suggests that these discourses have much to say to and about each other. This course introduces students to SF by focusing on short fiction and essays by a variety of writers of African descent, including Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, George Schuyler, Charles Saunders, Derrick Bell, W.E.B. DuBois, Nalo Hopkinson, Walter Mosley, and more. A number of issues will be explored: Is SF "literature"? Is there an identifiable "Afrofuturist" aesthetic? How do these works represent or comment on a politics of (racial, class, gender, sexual) difference? The course will also feature a screening of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Far Beyond the Stars" as well as other video and musical texts. Course requirements include class attendance and participation, weekly response papers, and a 6-8-page final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 Community Participation and Service. (1-2 credits). (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an experiential course that enables students to do community participation and service under the direct supervision of onsite program heads coordinated by a CAAS faculty member. Internships have been arranged through selected programs under way at Washtenaw Community College (WCC). The student would commit 15 hours of community service during the term, on a schedule to be determined in consultation with the onsite program directors and CAAS staff. Some of the current possibilities for internships through this cooperative project include: 1) doing academic tutoring with "at-risk" 9th and 10th graders; 2) working with young children in a fully licensed childcare facility; 3) tutoring adults seeking to complete a high school equivalency; 4) helping to conduct research on the progress and needs of the minority student body at WCC. All of these community service opportunities are intended to engage interns in collaborative work in well-established programs used to providing counseling, tutoring, and other kinds of support to under-served populations, as well as to engage them in acts of dialogue and self-reflection concerning their onsite experiences. Entry and exit interviews are required, with either a journal or brief self-evaluation to be handed in by the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 (1 credit). (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 004 Race, Gender, and the First Amendment: Examining Arguments For And Against Restricting Hate-Speech. (1 credit). Meets March 6 April 5. (Drop/Add deadline=March 12).

Instructor(s): Tracy Edwards (edwardst@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (1-2). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will explore questions such as: What are proffered justifications for and against the restriction of racist and misogynist hate-speech? What types of expression should count as hate-speech? What is the purported harm of hate-speech and how do we assess its extent and duration? Reading assignments will include works from contemporary critical race and feminist theorists such as Kimberlè Williams Crenshaw, Richard Delgado, and Mari Matsuda; opposing responses from liberal theorists such as Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Nadine Strosson; and supporting responses from liberal theorists such as Frederick Schauer and Cass Sunstein.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 001 Prosperos, Calibans, Mirandas, and Others: Race and Gender in the New World. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 611.001, American Culture 699.001, and History 698.003.

Instructor(s): Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (csmithro@umich.edu), Arlene Rosemary Keizer

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 611.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 002 THE URBAN ETHNOGRAPHIC TRADITION. Meets with Sociology 597.001

Instructor(s): Alford A Young Jr (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Urban ethnography is one of the oldest and most renown subfields in sociology. By paying specific attention to literature that addresses experiences in race and class inequality, this course provides a critical consideration of the contributions of this tradition. Each work in the course will be explored in terms of three central themes:

  1. theoretical, or claims made about culture and social organization
  2. methodological, or the employment of research tools (e.g., participant-observation, interviewing) and designs (e.g., the community study, the streetcorner/public space study, the organizational unit or social group study), and
  3. positional/standpoint, or the narrative styles employed by ethnographers (i.e., whether and how researchers situate their own voices in these works).

Additionally, attention will be given to where and how each work fits into the intellectual history of ethnographic research and the social and cultural dynamics in American urban life at the time of its publication. The course literature includes classic Chicago School ethnographies, post-World War II urban studies, and contemporary works. Course requirements include a series of short critical reaction papers and a larger final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 003 The Spaces of James Baldwin. Meets with Art and Design 509.053 and American Culture 699.004.

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu), Coleman Austin Jordan

Prerequisites: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is a collaborative teaching project between faculty in two academic units: Program in American Culture and the professional School of Architecture and Urban Planning. It brings together graduate students from American Culture, Architecture, and the Center for African American Studies. By engaging in producing architectural and textual interpretations of Baldwin's "spaces of desire," students from different departments and programs will collaborate on "deterritorializing" disciplinary and curricular criteria, models, patterns, and scales. More specifically, the course aims to identify, interrogate, and encourage obscuring and subverting of socially constructed boundaries that have been set up to define race, gender, sexuality, and national identity. It does so by focusing on narrative and spatial interpretations of James Baldwin's work, and especially his "European" novel, Giovanni's Room, his short stories, and essays. Class discussions and group projects will also examine Baldwin's theorizing of and being represented through the lens of black masculinity and nationalism in an international context. In addition to literary critical material on Baldwin, readings include theoretical considerations of race, sexuality, and nationality, as well as those exploring social production, gendering, and racialization of space. We will also watch the following films: "Ethnic Notions," "The Birth of a Nation," and "Paris Is Burning." Requirements include attendance, participation in group projects, and willingness to be challenged by new concepts, as well as trying one's hand/pen at alternative kinds of "cultural/(academic) production" (e.g., students used to producing "text" may be expected to assist in designing and building objects, while those from architecture to incorporate textuality into their designs and products). The course will culminate in a collective exhibit/showcase/installation that will constitute the students' final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 781/Hist. 781. Seminar in Black American History.

Section 001 RESEARCH METHODS AND CONTROVERSIES.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 781.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 786/Hist. 786. Seminar in African History.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 786.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 828/Doctoral 828 (Social Work). Human, Economic, and Community Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Wallace Jr (johnwall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Undergraduate Course Listings for CAAS.


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