College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 9:01 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


ANTHRCUL 403. Japanese Society and Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a multi-media course designed to introduce and explore the salient patterns in and of (mostly post-WW2) Japanese society and culture. Our overall aim is to appreciate the ways in which Japanese women and men, girls and boys from punks and theatre fans to police officers and office workers construe, construct, communicate, reproduce, and resist everyday practices and realities. We will also challenge and transcend parochial stereotypes of Japan (of Japanese and Euro-American invention alike). Japan warrants closer attention by Americans and for more reasons than the wild success of animation (anime'), Nintendo, and Pokemon in their everyday lives. Long characterized in the popular and scholarly media as the "cultural opposite" of the United States for example, "the Japanese" are homogeneous, more polite, less litigious, less violent (but more suicidal), and more tuned to nature than "the Americans" people are understandably surprised to learn that Japan was a powerful empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; that it has a long history of social unrest and feminist activism; that it is a multi-ethnic society; that its mass media thrive on gratuitous sex and violence; and that its environment is one of the most polluted in the capitalist world. Rather than casting Japan and the U.S. as opposites, it is more productive to understand the various forces and circumstances out of which institutions such as the constitution, educational system, racism, consumerism, health care, popular entertainment, the police, etc. emerged and were shaped in each society. This then, is our mission: to look carefully and closely at those Japanese social structures, institutions and practices that either closely resemble or greatly deviate from those of mainstream America so that we can simultaneously learn how to understand better the complexities of American culture and society which is far more than just the "opposite" of everything Japan represents. Ditto Japan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We will also explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 411/AAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. AAS 200 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to and familiarize them with the nature and dynamics of the unity and diversity of pre-colonial sub-Saharan African cultures and societies. The focus is on INSTITUTIONAL characteristics. Topics covered include: ecology and environment; the distribution of races and peoples; economic institutions; kinship and marriage; political legal institutions; religious, magical, and witchcraft beliefs and practices; music/dance and the arts. Grades are based on four take-home papers and contributions to class discussions. Films and videos.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 417. Indians of Mexico and Guatemala.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 101, 222, or junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course provides an overview of Indian groups occupying Mexico and Guatemala. Groups include the Maya, Nahuatl (Aztec), Zapotec, Mixtec, Huichol, Mixe, Tarascans, etc. Course will focus on social and political organization, world view and religion, subsistence, settlement patterns, etc. Comparisons and contrasts between groups will be made in an effort to determine shared ancestry, the borrowing of various practices, the domination of one group over another, and independent developments. Two required papers (midterm and final) constitute course grade. No prerequisite. Text: Indians of Middle America, by Robert B. Taylor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 422. Ethnography in America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca L Upton (rupton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing, and one course in anthropology or American Culture at the 200 level or above. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores American society and culture through ethnographic studies, that is, studies based primarily on long-term participant observation. It also uses other commentaries on American society to frame questions. Central concerns of the course include the workings of class, history, and identity in American everyday life and moral discourse. These are explored in the domains of gender and ethnicity; schools and families; small communities and urban neighborhoods; and workplaces. American culture in the context of rapid social transformation includes a series of tensions that may be expressed in such oppositions as class versus equality, individual versus community, stability versus mobility. These tensions are expressed, either explicitly or unintentionally, in various kinds of cultural productions: films, novels, mass media. And they may be explored in ethnographies. While the general approach of exploring cultural tensions through the ethnography of everyday life will remain constant, the ethnographic focus (schools, families, work, communities, regions of the country) may vary from term to term. Seminar format; one brief midterm essay and one final paper.

Textbooks:

  • Weaving Work and Motherhood, by Anita Garey. Temple University Press, 1999.
  • Shadowed Lives, by Leo Chavez. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992.
  • No Place Like Home, by Chris Carrington. University of Chichago Press, 1999.
  • Racial Situations, by John Hartigen. Princeton, 1999.
  • Jocks and Burnouts, by Penelope Eckert. Columbia Teachers College, 1989.
  • Surrogate Motherhood, by Helena Ragone. Westview Press, 1994.
  • No Shame in my Game, by Katherine Newman. Vintage Books, 1999.
  • Exotics at Home, by Micaela Di Leonardo. University of Chicago Press, 1998.
  • Hermes' Dilemma and Hamlet's Desire, by Vincent Crapanzano. Harvard Univ. Press, 1992.
  • The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature and Art, by J. Clifford. Harvard University Press, 1988.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 426. Principles of Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Ann Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101 or 222. (3). May not be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An overall view of the field of anthropology, stressing basic concepts and objectives, designed for students specializing in other disciplines who are interested in the nature and scope of anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics. The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth. The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization; etc. The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 453/AAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. Nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women rights and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Indigenous Political Movements

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the prospects and limits of contemporary indigenous political movements. In Winter 2001, the course will be held in conjunction with a speaker series on indigenous political movements supported by the Ford Foundation (Crossing Borders Project, "Social Movements and Negotiated Revolutions") and the International Institute. Students will attend the public lectures and the class may also meet separately with the speakers.

The emergence of the 'indigenous' as a political category and social movement has opened up new politics and debates about alternative forms of sovereignty and resource use in many parts of the world. This course examines the efforts of indigenous peoples to ensure their own physical and cultural survival, as well as to protect their environment. The paradox of their position, however, is that in order to protect their rights, they often must become global activists: the maintenance of difference in the political economy of contemporary culture requires movement and translation across cultural, political and geographic boundaries. Working with these activities is a range of actors, each with their own agendas and resulting compromises for the communities that accept their support. These social movements have the capacity to introduce new ideas into the public domain in a compelling fashion, presenting alternatives to the universalizing discourses of science and capital. Topics may include, but are not limited to: definitions and histories of the indigenous; the politics of culture and representation; debates about sovereignty and special rights; social movements and civil society; alternative notions of space, place and time; the intersection of indigenous politics and global environmentalism; and indigenous knowledge and debate about cultural and intellectual property rights. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Pacific, Southeast Asia and the Americas, with special emphasis on Melanesia and Amazonia. Readings: several monographs, edited volumes and a course pack. Requirements: short discussion papers, term paper, participation and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many Americans and Europeans assume that communities normally are, or ought to be, monolingual that language differences divide people from one another, while a common language unites them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual. What do language differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? In this course we will consider the relationship between communication and community particularly as these have been conceptualized (and ideologized) under the rubrics of "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." We will explore what kinds of social groupings those terms might (or might not) label, and how they might (or might not) connect with languages and with communication networks. Our approach will be cross-culturally comparative and, where relevant, historical. Through a discussion of selected theoretical works and case studies, we will consider topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and print media; language and the idea of "nation" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in nationalistic movements. In addition to the class discussions and readings that involve the whole class, each student will explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, as in-class test, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner (spastner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes.

Textbooks:

  • The West of the Imagination. by W. Goetzmann and W. Goetzmann.
  • Erect Men/Undulating Women. by M. Wiber.
  • Eaters of the Dead. by M. Crichton.
  • Blackrobe. by B. Moore.
  • Keepers of the Game. by C. Martin.
  • Dance of the Tiger. by B. Kurten.
  • The Cultural Life of Images. by B. Molyneaux.
  • And course pack.

In addition to the required texts and "course pack," students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Violence & Social Order: Making Sense of Force, Terror, Torture & Politics.

Instructor(s): Daniel M Rothenberg (dmrothen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will investigate the relationship between violence and social order. Is violence an necessary element of society? What is violence? How is it regulated, understood, and experienced? The course will consider different theoretical perspectives on the definition and meaning of violence as understood through both institutional and non-institutional mechanisms of regulating behavior. The course grounds interdisciplinary theoretical discussions with a series of case studies focusing on: violent crime, domestic violence, religious violence, imaginary violence and state violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 473/Ling. 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology, linguistics, or literature. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do we understand the verbal art of non-western peoples without imposing our pre-conceived folk ideas about form, performance, authorship, and textuality? And if we do manage to hear and study these arts in their own "terms," can we translate and represent them without making a caricature of these sources? This course will consider efforts by anthropologists, linguists, poets, folklorists, and literary theorists to address these questions at several levels: (1) working our methodologies which allows us to see the poetics in others' arts; (2) critically assessing the methodologies; and (3) exploring theories about differences between oral literatures and written traditions as well as the cultural shaping of literatures. We will also consider what ways this work contributes to reshaping anthropology itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 488. Prehistory of Mexico.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent V Flannery (kflanner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers the Prehispanic culture sequence for Mesoamerica outside the Maya region. It begins with the first evidence for humans in late Pleistocene Mexico, and proceeds to a discussion of Archaic hunting-and-gathering period of 8000-2000 B.C. The origins of agriculture during this preceramic period are documented, as well as the rise of sedentary agricultural villages by 1500 B.C. The course then considers the evolution of ranked societies during the Formative Period (1500 B.C.-A.D. 100) and of urban stratified societies during the Classic Period (A.D. 100-800). The evolution of Mexico's ethnohistorically documented Postclassic societies the Toltec, Aztec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Huastec, and Tarascans is then traced up to the Spanish Conquest of A.D. 1519. There will be two lectures a week, accompanied by reading of a course pack of relevant journal articles and book chapters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 491. Prehistory of the Central Andes.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jpar/ant491/

This course examines the development of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations from the terminal Pleistocene (ca. 13,000 years ago) through the European contact period (16th century A.D.). Major emphasis is on the archaeological study of increasingly complex society after ca. 3000 B.C. in the region between central Chile and Colombia. One previous course in basic anthropology is desirable. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a take-home midterm exam (25%), a take-home final exam (50%), and a 10-15 page term paper (25%). Textbook: Indigenous South Americans of the Past and Present: An Ecological Perspective, by David J. Wilson, Westview Press. 1999.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 492. Prehistory of Oceania.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the spread of people into the islands of the Pacific Ocean, beginning with the colonization of Australia about 50,000 years ago and continuing up to the spread of the Polynesians to the most distant isles. Ecological, Human Biological, Linguistic, and Archaeological data will be brought to bear on both specific historical problems and some of the broad anthropological concerns that have made Oceania a source of new ideas for anthropologists for almost a century. The basis of student evaluation includes an in-class essay midterm and final, or original independent research paper.

Textbooks:

Required: On the Road of the Winds... by Patrick V. Kirch. 2000. University of California Press. ISBN 0-5202-23457-0.

Recommended: Evolution of Polynesian Chiefdoms. by Patrick V. Kirch. 1989. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-5212-7316-1 (paperback).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 503. Non-Western Colonialisms.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, History, and/or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar foregounds imperialist regimes and colonialist states operating outside of Western Europe and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing in particular on Japan. The absence of the Japanese Empire in the (mostly Eurocentric if also anti-orientalist) anthropological literature on colonialism and imperialism is puzzling. Perhaps the fact that Japan was not colonized by Euro-American powers coupled with its ambivalent status in Asia as an anit-colonial colonizer complicates and confounds the East-West binarism informing the critique of Orientalism? It was in the late 19th century that the Japanese state initiated an imperialist project of its own, beginning with the colonization of Hokkaido in 1869, the annexation of Okinawa in 1879, the acquisition of peninsular Manchuria and Taiwan in 1895, the annexation of Korea in 1905, the acquisition of Micronesia in 1919, and eventually, by the end of 1942, dominion over a vast area stretching from the Solomon Islands to Burma's border with India, and from the rain forests of New Guinea to the icy shores of the Aleutian Islands. Japanese colonial ideologues pursued a program of Japanization cloaked in the rhetoric of Pan-Asianis a program whose ramifications are evident today in the conception and structure of nation-ness in Southeast Asia particularly.

This multi-media seminar explores the making and unmaking of the Japanese Empire, focusing on social organizations, assimilation policies, and such cultural strategies as art, film and theater, advertising, education, religion, youth groups, internment camps, sexual slavery, etc... It offers as important corrective to the more Eurocentric literature on colonialism and imperialism. Assignments include reading and discussing the required texts, writing and presenting several short papers (2-5 pages, depending on the assignment), and a final paper (10-15 pages) on a relevant subject of your choice (and my approval).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 527. Traditions of Ethnology II.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A continuation of Traditions in Ethnology I. It covers the period from about 1950 to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 556. Fieldwork, Research Methods, and Cultural Anthropology as a Profession.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, conducted as a seminar, examines the expectations of cultural anthropology (academic and applied) as a profession, including the relation between theory and practice in several contexts: choosing a research area and problem; grant application strategies; various kinds of fieldwork; old and new frames of analysis (local, transitional, diasporic, interpersonal); research design; data analysis and interpretation; and forms of anthropological writing. Special attention will be given throughout to qualitative research methods and analytical styles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Anthropology/History Core Seminar. Meets with History 604.002.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), David Cohen

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is about theory, methods, and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on the interplay of history and anthropology. This course will be based on the intensive discussion of classical and pathbreaking articles and monographs. It is particularly intended for students in the Anthropology and History Program as well as in the Departments of History and Anthropology who are interested in developing projects which involve the integration of historical and anthropological perspectives. This course will meet once a week in the evening. Students will have the option of developing their concerns doing summer research and taking a research seminar during the Fall, whether written work and research in progress will be discussed. Students interested in taking this course are encouraged to send a brief (one page) email notice or written statement to the instructor indicating their interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Nature, Landscape, Place

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines anthropological discourses on nature in light of the growing theoretical literatures on place and landscape. How are natural landscapes produced in ethnographic writing, travel literature, and literatures of scientific exploration? How have these landscapes been employed in projects of development and scientific imperialism? Should place-centered ethnography be giving way to ethnographies of movement over a global landscape? We will explore exemplary ethnographies of nature and place along with the more phenomenological literature on place and landscape. We seek a creative cross-fertilization of these literatures that will contribute to our capacity to produce engaged, grounded, and spatially and historically situated investigations of the social life of nature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Person, Subject, and Self Across Cultures, Histories & Disciplines. Meets with Rackham 570.003 and Asian Studies 605.001

Instructor(s): E Webb Keane Jr (wkeane@umich.edu), Robert H Sharf (rsharf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will grapple with a set of seemingly intractable intellectual quandaries bearing on the idea of the person/subject/self. Is there a useful set of analytic distinctions to be made among "person," "self," and "subject"? Do these notions vary across cultures, or across time? What might be the moral and ethical consequences of the variations we observe? Does it make sense to speak of a peculiarly modern self? What does it mean to speak of "cultural construction" with reference to the person? Can contemporary findings in cognitive science, cognitive psychology,or philosophy of mind, be brought to bear on work done on person/subject/self in history, anthropology, literature, or cultural studies? Our aim is to bring a modicum of order and clarity to this complex set of issues. Readings will be drawn from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, cognitive science, history, philosophy, psychology, and religious studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 576. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 582. Archaeology II.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of world prehistoric cultural development from village life to urban civilization. It introduces theories of the origin of agriculture, the development of ranked and stratified societies, and the origin of states and empires. Exemplary data from Mesoamerica, the Central Andes and Mesopotamia are used to test these theories.

Textbooks:

Required: Emergence of Agriculture. 2nd Edition. by W. H. Freeman. ISBN 0-7167-6030-4. (paperback)

Ancient Mesopotamia. by Susan Pollock. 1999. Cambridge University Press. (paperback) ISBN 0-5215-7568-0.

Ancient Mesoamerica: A Comparison... by Richard E. Blanton, Steven Kowalewski, and Linda Nicholas. 1993. Cambridge University Press.

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ANTHRCUL 618/LACS 618/ Hist. 618 Early Ethnography in South America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 The Incas: Andean and Spanish Ideas About Their History and Social Organization

Instructor(s): Sabine MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 618.001.

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ANTHRCUL 640/Hist. 603. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Agrarian Questions Peasants, Power, and Transitions To and From Capitalism

Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores broad concerns at the intersections of the political economy of development and the dialectics of culture and economy through the lens of a specific intellectual genealogy: "the Agrarian Question." We will begin with the formulation of the Agrarian Question in the late 19th century on the periphery of European capitalism as an engagement with three problems: the persistence of peasants or family farmers in transitions to capitalism, the political role of peasantries in state formation and revolution, and the difference of agrarian capitalism. With these questions as anchors, we turn to a series of monographs (from areas as varies as Russia, Tanzania, Italy, India, Chiapas, California, Bulgaria, etc...) to watch these themes mature. The persistence question, for instance, has opened up gender and kinship politics as central elements in configuring hybrid forms of capitalism that harness pre- or non-capitalist institutions like families. The question of agriculture's difference (from manufacturing) provides a way of thinking of the continuing effects of nature-society relations in the industrialization of agriculture, and on the ways in which "flexible specialization" is a much older phenomenon than recent studies of industry admit. Finally, the question of politics allows a vantage into questions of subalternity, mobilization and citizenship in actually-existing agrarian socialisms and capitalisms. This exploration into "agrarian questions" should be useful not just to students of the agrarian, but for thinking at the intersection of political economy and cultural studies at the variety of ways in which transitions to and from capitalism are made. This is primarily a reading course centering on key debates and monographs, to which students will be required to write short critical responses. A second requirement will be the construction or refinement of a research proposal.

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ANTHRCUL 652. Ethnographic Writing.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course considers the history, politics, and possibilities of ethnographic writing. We will discuss a variety of ethnographic genres, including literary journalism, experimental ethnography, feminist ethnography, travel accounts, the memoir, poetry of witness, investigative reporting, documentary image-texts, the ethnographic novel, and autobiographical criticism. Our focus will be on the dilemmas of writing narratives of place and voice. We will analyze a range of textural strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places. In addition to familiarizing ourselves with these literary genres and textual strategies, I want to provide a workshop environment for members of the class to strengthen their own writing and embark on major ethnographic projects of their own. Students often say the don't get opportunities to try their hand at ethnographic writing before embarking on fieldwork. I hope this course will fill that need by providing a foundation for the production of more creative daring, and original writing that can speak to and beyond the academy.

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ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 New Perspectives on International Human Rights Truth Commissions, Tribunals and the Meaning of State Terror

Instructor(s): Daniel Rothenberg (dmrothen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Human rights can be understood as the first global moral discourse of an emerging international order. First enunciated in the aftermath of the Second World War, human rights conventions defined a set of basic international principles and offered a general promise of the possibility of a more equitable world. This course reviews basic ideas regarding human rights theory and practice. The course then focuses on two interrelated trends in contemporary human rights: a renewed interest in addressing impunity through criminal prosecutions and the institutionalization of responses to human rights violations that consider the meaning of these acts. To address these issues, this course will consider the International Criminal Tribunals for the ex-Yugoslavia and Rwanda, truth commissions in Chile, El Salvador and South Africa, as well as issues of amnesty, reparations and historical memory.

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ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001 Ancient Political Systems. (2 credits).

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 002 EARLY HISTORIC SOUTH ASIA: HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY. (3 credits). Meets with History 605.001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu) , Thomas R. Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/humin/trautmann/course.html

This course, taught by an historian and an archaeologists, considers archaeological and textual evidence to examine a range of issues in the late prehistoric and early historic periods of South Asia (from c. 1500 BC to 1500 AD). Through combining these two very different classes of evidence, we seek both to document and understand historic processes and sequences in South Asia and to examine the nature and relations between different sources of evidence for the study of the South Asian past. The course will be structured around five major themes: politics of knowledge, language and race, states and empires, gender, and religion. Throughout we will be concerned both the textual and physical evidence of the South Asian past and with how colonial and postcolonial intellectual developments have contributed to shaping understandings of South Asian history.

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ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 003 Evolution of Old World States and Empires in Comparative Perspectives. (3 credits). Meets with Classical Archaeology 890.001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu), John Cauclner Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History of Art 390.001.

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ANTHRCUL 760/Psych. 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the context and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

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ANTHRCUL 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology Or A Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ANTHRCUL 825/Hist. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 825.

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ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

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ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

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ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

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ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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