College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies


This page was created at 9:02 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AAPTIS

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.


AAPTIS 404. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is the second part of a one-year sequence of Modern Standard Arabic whose objectives are to enable the student: (1) to understand main ideas and some details of spoken Standard Arabic discourse involving short stories, descriptions, and communicative exchanges; (2) to narrate and describe daily activities using short paragraphs; (3) to read and understand main ideas and factual information based on texts including edited short narration, description, and travel; and (4) to write summaries of materials read and discussed in class and narrate and describe in paragraph length. The method of instruction stresses the four language skills with particular emphasis on oral and written practice based on selected readings taken from various genres of modern prose fiction and non-fiction and A-V cultural materials. The course is conducted in Arabic and meets six hours weekly. Course grade is based on classroom performance, weekly written assignments and quizzes, a midterm, and three periodic tests. Required text: course pack.

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AAPTIS 452. Introductory Ottoman Turkish, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gottfried Hagen

Prerequisites: Turkish 451. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Second half of first-year Ottoman intended to sharpen skills in the handling of a variety of styles, topics and scripts through the reading and analysis of specially selected texts. Quizzes and a final examination required.

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AAPTIS 467/Hist. 541/Religion 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the history of diverse Alid movements from the assassination of Ali (d. 661) to the crystallization of Shi'ism into distinct political, legal, and theological schools (Twelver, Isma'ili, Zaydi), and ends with the establishment of Twelver Shi'ism as an imperial religion in Safavi Iran (1501-1722). Emphasis on the debate over authority in Islam.

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AAPTIS 469. Islamic Intellectual History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adam Sabra (asabra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents some of the great thinkers and ideas of the classical Islamic tradition. It explores a number of fields, ranging from law and theology to mysticism and philosophy. The focus will be on a close reading of a number of "great books" of the Islamic tradition, by authors such as Ibn Sina, Ibn Arabi, Ghazali, and Ibn Khaldun. The primary source readings will be supplemented by some modern historical accounts. Two papers, midterm, final exam.

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AAPTIS 487/Hist. 443. Modern Middle East History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/syl443.htm

See History 443.001.

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AAPTIS 488. History of Arabic Literature in English.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa and encompassing moralistic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet will be examined in detail. Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists will illustrate the values and concerns of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arab culture over extended periods of time and place. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentation of essays to the class. Five essays will be required and will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

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AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 Colonial Critiques of Modernity. Meets with Comparative Literature 490.001.

Instructor(s): Yaseen Noorani (ynoorani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the colonial period in the late 19th century, Arab and Muslim ideologies of communal identity have often contained implicit or explicit critiques of colonialism, Western culture, or modernity as a whole. These critiques may be loosely classified as religious, nativist, or Marxist in character. Their role in the articulation of visions of a social ideal, as well as in diagnosing present social and political ills, constitutes an important aspect of the development of Arabic social thought in the twentieth century. This course will trace the development of these critiques and their interactions, and view their relation to similar critiques emerging both in Europe itself and in other parts of the third world. We will focus especially on the manner in which the reconstruction of a communal past which already contains an authentic version of modernity is important to visions of both Islamic civilization and the Arab nation. We will attempt to uncover the logic implicit in such reconstructions, and observe its employment in the service of a variety of political orientations. We will also examine how the critiques of such ideological reconstructions made by Marxist thinkers, who attempt to establish a communal ideal without the benefit of a glorious past antecedent. Readings will be selected from both literary and discursive antecedent. Readings will be selected from both literary and discursive materials. These will include poetry of Muhammad Iqbal, Adunis, Badr Shakir al-Sayyab, as well as such works as Occidentosis by Jalal Al-e Ahmad; The Crisis of the Arab Intellectual by Abdallah Laroui; The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon; Marxism and Other Western Fallacies by Ali Shariati; Eurocentrism by Samir Amin. For comparative purposes we will look at such works as Schiller's Aesthetic Education; Culture and Society by Raymond Williams; Notes from the Underground by Dostoyesvsky; The Dialectic of Enlightenment by Adorno and Horkheimer.

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AAPTIS 495/WS 471/Hist. 546/Rel. 496. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The general aim of the course is to understand gender roles in Islam, both from a legal and religious perspective, as well as from behind the veil and the walls of royal harems. An introduction to Muslim understandings of gender and sex, first, through a survey of those sacred texts (Quran & Hadith) that came to define gender as well as the roles and mores of women and men in their relationships. Sexuality and the erotic will then be studied through other forms of popular Islamic literature such as "belles lettres" and mystical poetry. Finally, gender participation in the political and cultural life of the Safavi, Ottoman and Mughal courts shall be explored to view the interplay between theory and practice in early modern Islamdom. Weekly readings and preparation for class discussions. A midterm and final exam. One final research paper.

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AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AAPTIS 540/Ling. 540. Structure of Persian and Iranian Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in Iranian, Near Eastern Languages and comparative linguistics. The objective of this course is the position of Persian within Iranic dialectology and the larger context of symbolic and adjacent language groups.

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AAPTIS 561. Modern Arabic Fiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic(3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic, and class discussions will be in English.

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AAPTIS 567. Readings in Classical Islamic Texts.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alexander D Knysh (alknysh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on a close reading and analysis of Islamic texts from the classical epoch (i.e., from the 9th century through the 14th century C.E.). We shall read and discuss texts and their authors and try to place them in the religio-political context of their time. Special attention will be given to the grammatical difficulties of the texts and the scholarly terminology of such Islamic disciplines, as hadith, 'aqida, tasawwuf, ikhtilafat. After several weeks of guided readings and discussions, each student will be asked to select an Arabic Islamic text (of their choice), distribute it among the members of the group, and lead a discussion session based on the text at hand. Evaluation will be based on class participation, a class presentation and a final written exam.

Requirement: To secure a high grade in this course, the students must attend all classes and take active part in the reading and translation of assigned passages. Missed classes must be made up by written translations completed at home. Students' final grade will be determined by the following: class performance 25%, class presentation 30%, and the final written exam 45%.

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AAPTIS 569. Modern Arabic Poetry.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Fluency in Arabic at the advanced level (AAPTIS 502 or equivalent). (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading and discussing a poem in the original language. Having established the historical and aesthetic background for the emergence and development of modern Arabic poetry, we will closely read and analyze selected poems written throughout the century, representing different schools and trends: neoclassicism, romanticism, symbolism, free-verse, prose-poetry, and modernism. A special emphasis will be put on the influence of T.S. Eliot, and other western poets, on modern Arabic poetry. The list will include authors such as: Ahmad Shawqi, Khalil Mutran, Kahlil Gibran, Said Aql, Al-Sayyab, al-Bayyati, Qabbani, Adonis, Darwish, and other, less known poets.

The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, both at the individual and the group level. At the individual level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific poem of his/her choice, and present it in class. A term paper is due at the end of the term. Intended for Graduate and advanced undergraduates in NES or CMENAS, who are fluent in Arabic, and have completed Arabic 502 or equivalent. Seminar format.

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AAPTIS 580/Hist. of Art 581. Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Section 001 A Millennium of Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 285. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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AAPTIS 582. Classical Arabic IV.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad S Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 581. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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AAPTIS 592. Seminar in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 Constructions of Cultural Memory and Collective Identity: Readings in Theory and Practice. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.002.

Instructor(s): Carol B Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will examine a selection of theoretical works on the construction of cultural memory and collective identity, and while some of the focus will be on these issues in the context of the "nation" and "nationalism" with accompanying constructions (and interrogations and subversions) of national myths, considerable emphasis will be sustained on those contexts which do not fit easily, neatly, or at all into dominant or hegemonic configurations of collective identity and cultural memory, including, but not limited to collective identities constructed in contexts of displacement, deterritorialization, trauma, hybridization/fusion, etc. Against or alongside the body of theoretical literature on this topic, we will examine a selection of primary works (drawing on literary, filmic, and an array of popular cultural sources) and secondary works that articulate or analyze collective identity and cultural memory as they have been constructed and circulated in very specific and concrete historical contexts. The specific contexts or "examples" we will focus on will reflect the research interests of the students in the seminar in consultation with the instructor, as well as those of the instructor, which will foreground as one cluster of "examples" Palestinian and Israeli/Zionist/Jewish discourses of collective identity and cultural memory in the context of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict (previous expertise on this particular context is not expected).

Requirements: Students will be required to write one final in-depth research paper for this course, and to give 1-2 in-class seminar presentations. Permission of instructor is required for participation in this seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 592. Seminar in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 002 Islamic Cultural Space.

Instructor(s): Yaseen Noorani (ynoorani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the 19th century, European travelers to the Middle East were often struck by the exoticness of the spaces in which people conducted their lives. It became commonplace to see these spaces as the expression of the Oriental mind, and this attitude frequently appears in Orientalist scholarship. More recent research has focused on the objective historical conditions underlying the development of social spaces in the Middle East. At the same time, a number of theorists have uncovered the presuppositions inherent in modern conceptions of how space should be organized, seeking to dispel the notion that prevailing spatial categories are natural or absolute. Many of these theorists have posited a radical discontinuity between pre-modern and modern conceptions of space and spatial practices. This puts us in a position to reconsider the relationship between medieval ways of thinking about and representing space and the actual places in which people lived. What sort of spatial categories existed in medieval Muslim societies? Are these categories heterogeneous across cultural domains and over time, or are there common, persisting features? How can we connect these categories to the actual social production and reproduction of spatial relations and practices? We will consider such questions by looking at a wide variety of texts, literary, historical, geographical, religious and philosophic, focusing on such archetypal sites as the garden and the court, and relating these to descriptions of the spaces of everyday life. At the same time, we will draw on the findings and tools of contemporary historical and geographical research. Readings will be in Arabic, Persian, and English.

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AAPTIS 593. Mini Course Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 Modern Turkish Women Writers in Translation. Meets Jan 4 Feb 21. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Mehmet Oguz Cebeci

Prerequisites: (1).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Women writers have had a significant impact on the literature of modern Turkey. Halide Edip Adivar played an active role in the establishment of the Turkish Republic, and her novel "The Clown and his Daughter" (1935) portrays Istanbul society in the late Ottoman period. Since that time, women have often been at the center of the movements which brought Turkish literature into contact with Western trends. Significant issues among contemporary women writers include Pinar Kur's interest in the feminist cause, Latife Tekin's description of the situation of marginalized social or ethnic groups, and Sevgi Ozdamar's attempts at a cultural synthesis among Turkish migrants in Germany. Their works also portray the unique situation of women trying to define their identities in a society uneasily balanced between Islamic tradition and rapid modernizaiton which connects them at some point with the traditional discourse of Islamic women writers.

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AAPTIS 660/Hist. 827. Seminar in Problems and Methods of Research on Medieval Near East.

Section 001 The Mapping of Arabia. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 611.002 and MENAS 695.034/Hist. 793.034/AAPTIS 793.034.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 461 or equivalent. Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 611.002.

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AAPTIS 665. Modern Arabic Literature in Arabic.

Section 001 Taught in Arabic.

Instructor(s): Mousa Mitry Khoury (musa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Advanced proficiency in Arabic (through 500-level). (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we examine the emergence of what has come to be referred to as modern Arabic literature, and the development of what has become its repertoire of genres, looking back briefly at some of the earlier forms drawn upon as models that were emulated or re-defined, but focusing primarily on the Arabic literary production of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course aims to accomplish several goals simultaneously: it is designed to provide graduate students with an overview of the field of modern Arabic literature from which to choose an area of concentration in their future graduate work, and as part of the preparation for their preliminary examinations; it is also designed to give graduate students, particularly "non-native" speakers of Arabic, the opportunity to integrate and expand their Arabic language competence squarely within this particular area of scholarly focus. With those goals in mind, the class will be conducted in Arabic in a seminar format, and assigned readings will include selected primary texts in Arabic of the genres and trends studied (included but not limited to the 'maqama,' essay, memoir, short story, novel and poetry) as well as secondary sources on the history and development of modern Arabic literature in both English and Arabic. Student presentations and papers will be done in Arabic, and discussion and lecture will be conducted in Arabic.

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AAPTIS 793/MENAS 695/Hist. 793. The Study of the Near East.

Section 001 The Mapping of Arabia. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 611.002 and AAPTIS 660.001/Hist. 827.001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 611.002.

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AAPTIS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AAPTIS 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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AAPTIS 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for AAPTIS.


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