College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biology


This page was created at 9:02 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Biology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for BIOLOGY

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Biology.


BIOLOGY 400. Advanced Research.

Prerequisites: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

BIOLOGY 401. Advanced Topics in Biology.

Section 101 MODEL SYSTEMS IN CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY IN THE ERA OF ADVANCED MOLECULAR-GENETICS AND WHOLE GENOME SEQUENCES.

Instructor(s): Rolf Andre Bodmer (rolf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with a strong desire to learn about the state of the art principles and experimental approaches of a variety of model systems in developmental biology. Six internationally distinguished research scholars will spend four days in residence at the University and deliver two lectures, conducting one formal and two informal discussion sessions, and meeting individually with students. In alternate weeks, the students will hear an introductory lecture and discuss primary literature on the model system represented by the visiting scholar.

This 3 credit course will meet Tuesday and Thursday at 12:00 in 2004 NS for lecture followed by an informal discussion section, and Wednesday at 12:00 for a discussion of primary research papers assigned by the visiting scholar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 401. Advanced Topics in Biology.

Section 201 VISUAL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING ON MONDAY, JAN. 8, 10:00 AM IN 2111 NS.

Instructor(s): Stephen S Easter Jr (sseaster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for students who have had an introductory course in biology and an intermediate course in either developmental biology or neurobiology or both. Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

BIOLOGY 412. Teaching Biochemistry by the Keller Plan.

Instructor(s): Marcy P Osgood (mosgood@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Biol. 311 and permission of instructor. (3). This is a graded course. May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio311/proctor.shtml

Undergraduates who previously have taken an introductory biochemistry course act as TAs for Introductory Biochemistry (Biology 311). TAs meet with the instructor for a two-hour class each week for lectures, presentations, and discussions of teaching and biochemistry. TAs also prepare a report on a recent advance in biochemistry which they present to their peers and the instructor. The major roles of the TAs are to examine the students on their mastery of unit material and to help the students with explanations supplementary to the textbook. At the completion of an instructor-generated written quiz, the student and TA grade the quiz together. TAs learn considerable biochemistry by repeated teachings of unit materials and, in addition, profit from their experience as teachers and evaluators.

Text:

  • Principles of Biochemistry by Lehninger, Nelson and Cox

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 415. Plant Constituents and Their Functions.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Larry D Nooden (ldnum@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 162 and one term of organic chemistry. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~ldnum/bio415/415home.html

    Lectures surveying the major secondary compounds in plants, their functions in plants, and their effects on animals. The compounds, which are grouped primarily according to a functional rather than a structural basis, include: pigments, fragrances, hormones, allelopathic agents, toxins (including mycotoxins and carcinogens), medicinal compounds, hallucinogens, plant defenses against pathogens, and others. They are considered in terms of their value to plants, their mode of action, and their evolution or potential use as phyletic markers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 419. Endocrinology Laboratory.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 418. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio419/

    This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with methods used in endocrinological investigations. The students will learn techniques ranging from the organismal to the molecular level. The course emphasizes hypothesis testing, modern techniques and data analysis. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIO 418 is required to take this course. The enrollment is limited to 12 students. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. The laboratory will meet twice a week (a four-hour session and a two-hour session), however, students should anticipate an additional two or three hours laboratory time at various (and occasionally odd) times in the week. Course assignments include a term paper, quizzes, and other short assignments.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 427. Molecular Biology.

    Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD MONDAY EVENINGS, FEB. 5, MAR. 19, AND APR. 16, 6-8 P.M.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Helling (helling@umich.edu) , Janine R Maddock (maddock@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Comprehensive coverage of the general principles governing the structures, synthesis, and functions of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the context of the cell. Emphasizes understanding methods and interpretation of data. Topics include genome organization, DNA replication and transposition, chromosome segregation, transcription and translation, the processing of macromolecules, signal transfer, and regulation at various levels. Two lectures per week are supplemented by a 1.5 hour discussion section.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 428. Cell Biology.

    Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD TUESDAY EVENING, FEB. 6, AND THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 15, FROM 6-8 PM

    Instructor(s): James Bardwell (jbardwel@umich.edu) , Kenneth M Cadigan (cadigan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. Students with credit for Biol. 320 must obtain permission of instructor. (4).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 428 is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the biology of eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the cellular and molecular level. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. The information is presented at a level that requires students to integrate information from their other biology, chemistry, and biochemistry courses. Topics include: cell structure and function; cell membranes; intracellular organelles and cytoskeleton; inter- and intra-cellular signaling; cell development and cell cycle. Students will be expected to integrate the scientific data presented in class as well as to read and interpret basic research drawn from the current scientific literature. Grades will be based on four exams and the discussion section.

    Contact jbardwel@umich.edu or cadigan@umich.edu if you have questions regarding the course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 429. Laboratory in Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Eric D Mann (ericmann@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 427 or 428, or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 428. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. Chem. 416 or 516. (3). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course consists of one lecture and two four hour laboratory sessions each week. Additional time outside of scheduled laboratory sessions will be required. The lectures provide the background for techniques used in the laboratory and assume a fundamental knowledge of cell and molecular biology. The laboratory sessions introduce microscopy, mammalian cell culture and fractionation, expression vectors, and nucleic acid and protein electrophoretic techniques. Grades are based on two exams, laboratory practical quizzes, and a group grant proposal. The course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration and Microbiology Concentration. It is also appropriate for the Biology Concentration.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 445/Geology 445. Biogeography.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gerald Ray Smith (grsmith@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 162. Historical Geology is recommended. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~grsmith/

    Lectures and discussions explore the evolution of plants and animals in relation to past climates, geography, and ecology. Topics include physical and biotic limits to distribution, response of organisms to global patterns of temperature and moisture, ecology of dispersal, metapopulation theory, paleoecology, effects of ice ages, speciation, extinction, vicariant evolution, phylogenetic analysis, and species diversity gradients. The course will include workshops on application of spatial analysis programs (geographic information systems) and a term paper, which might or might not use GIS tools. Applications to conservation will be explored. Evaluation will be based on two exams and the term paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 450. Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ronald A Nussbaum (nuss@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 162. (5). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (5).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Lectures on the evolution, behavior, ecology, and life history of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory exercises and field trips emphasize identification, life history, adaptations, and field methods.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 469. Signal Transduction.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kenneth M Cadigan (cadigan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biology 427 or 428. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will cover selected aspects of animal signal transduction, focusing on critical reading and presentation of primary research papers. It will also emphasize the importance of combining genetic and biochemical approaches to gain a better understanding of cellular processes. Topics will include TGF and Notch signaling, MAP kinase cascades, and the tumor suppressor APC. Grades will be determined by discussion in class, an oral presentation and two written assignments. The course is intended for junior or senior CMB concentrators (who have taken either Biol. 427 or 428) and graduate students. The class will meet twice weekly for 90 minutes.

    Contact the instructor cadigan@umich.edu with any questions regarding the course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 472. Plant-Animal Interactions.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Beverly J Rathcke (brathcke@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biology 281. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, we will examine the ecology and evolution of the interactions between plants and animals and fungi including herbivory, pollination, dispersal, and resource mutualisms. Current theory, hypothesis testing, and empirical approaches will be examined in depth. The format will include two 1.5 hour lectures with interactive discussions per week. Readings will be from the current literature. No textbook is required. Assignments will include short papers or essays, a term paper with peer review, and an oral presentation. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 473. Aquatic Ecology Project Lab.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George W Kling II (gwk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: A course in ecology. No credit is granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biology 484. (3). Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~gwk

    This new Hughes course has an emphasis quite different from the more "cookbook" style of some laboratory courses, and it is structured around student project activities using the most modern research techniques. Some of the classes will be spent learning these techniques, but, very quickly, the students are guided through the process of designing a research project. There is an overall theme to all of the research projects (such as "changes over time in aquatic ecosystems"., and the students implement the research during the remainder of the academic term. They produce reports on their findings, and these reports are then combined and assembled by the students into a synthetic body of information. Thus, the fundamental focus of the course is to provide students with the tools to not only perform relevant research in aquatic ecosystems, but to provide students with the experience of bringing this research to a greater audience through the presentation or publication of results.

    This course is intended primarily for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. There will be two 3-hour lab sessions per week. Laboratory assignments and projects, written exams, and field trips will comprise requirements for this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 483. Limnology: Freshwater Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George W Kling II (gwk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, with background in physics, chemistry, biology, or water-related sciences. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~gwk/teaching/limno/lecture/b483syl.htm

    Limnology is the study of lakes, streams, and wetlands. This course focuses on the integration of physical, chemical, and biological properties of aquatic systems in order to understand the structure and function of these systems and their response to perturbations. Some of the topics covered in this course are: the origin of lakes; the ecology of aquatic organisms such as bacteria, algae, zooplankton, benthos, and fish; the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients; the pollution and eutrophication of lakes; the dynamics and flow of energy in food webs; paleolimnology; and experimental investigations using whole lakes. Lectures provide the student with a basic understanding of biological, physical, and chemical limnology in addition to presenting information from the current literature. Grades are based on exams and problem sets (no term paper). There is a required course pack and no textbook. A laboratory is offered as a separate course (Biology 473). This course fills concentration requirements in the area of Ecology and Evolution.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 487/NR&E 409. Ecology of Fishes.

    Sections 001 and 002, 4 credits; Section 003, 3 credits.

    Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: One course in ecology. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre409/

    No Description Provided

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    BIOLOGY 491. Principles of Phylogenetic Systematics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Arnold G Kluge (akluge@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 162. (4). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 491 focuses on cladistics, the most widely accepted approach used to discover species history. All aspects of phylogenetic inference, the philosophical, theoretical and methodological, are reviewed in lecture. Major topics include parsimony, species concepts and speciation, monophyletic taxonomy, vicariance biogeography and conservation, adaptation, and coevolution. In the laboratory-discussion section of the course, relevant microcomputer algorithms are used to test hypotheses from the original literature. There are three essay (take-home) examinations, five laboratory exercises, a term paper, and an oral presentation of the term paper topic. There is no required text; however, all of the many handouts and the original literature that is reviewed constitute the required course pack.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 496/NR&E 425. Population Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): James Edward Breck (breck@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: General ecology and NR&E 438; calculus recommended. (4). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/NRE425/index.html

    In this course you will learn the major concepts and models used in understanding the structure and abundance of populations in space and time. Population ecology is a very active area of research, making important contributions to the conservation and management of natural resources. This course is intended to give you an overview of this expanding field and the background to understand future developments. Lecture topics will include exponential population growth, resource-limited population growth, models with age structure or stage structure, individual-based models, metapopulations, spatial models, competition, predation, and patch dynamics. Major themes in the course include life history trade-offs, optimization, consequences of body size, and application of concepts and models to the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

    In order to learn this material you should apply it to solve problems. A structured set of problems will be assigned in the computer labs as homework. We will use spreadsheets (for example, Microsoft Excel) and mathematical software (for example, MathCad) to solve the problems and display the results.

    Goals. The goals of this course are to:

    • Become familiar with the major concepts and models in population ecology, and
    • Be able to use these as tools to solve applied problems in the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

    Through the readings and computer labs you will get experience in applying concepts and using analytical methods to help understand the dynamics of populations and help manage animal and plant populations.

    Required text: Gotelli, Nicholas J. 1998. A Primer of Ecology. 2nd ed. Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, Mass. [Available at the Michigan Union Bookstore; might also be at Michigan Book & Supply, and Ulrich's.] A bibliography is available containing references mentioned in lecture and lab, used in their preparation, as well as some key papers.

    Prerequisites: This course assumes you have taken an introductory course in general ecology and one year of calculus. Some familiarity with computer spreadsheet software (for example, Microsoft Excel) will be helpful. Mathematical software (MathCad) will be introduced.

    Course requirements. You will be expected to:

    • Attend lectures on a regular basis;
    • Complete weekly computer lab assignments;
    • Complete the term project;
    • Take the midterm exam and the final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 497. Community Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Deborah E Goldberg (degold@umich.edu) , Earl E Werner (eewerner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: A course in ecology. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An examination of current theory and empirical research on ecological communities. Emphasis is on the analyses of patterns in community structure and species diversity, and the mechanisms responsible for generating and maintaining these patterns. Specific topics include the roles of species interactions such as competition, predation, and mutualisms, environmental variation, and biogeography, in community processes. A background in ecology is required. Readings are from the original literature. There are two one-hour lectures and one two-hour discussion per week.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 501. Professional Writing in Biology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn W. Tosney (ktosney@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in a doctoral program relevant to Biology and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/research/labs/ktosney/file/Bio501.html

    Professional writing requires you to present arguments coherently and persuasively. Designing convincing arguments is a focus of this course. In the first half of the course, you will develop writing strategies that present arguments convincingly and clearly. You will learn how to recognize and then systematically eliminate elements that detract from clarity. You will learn to edit your own writing effectively. The second half of the course focuses on different professional tasks such as writing publishable research papers, designing effective posters, preparing fundable grant applications, and planning fulfilling career goals. Weekly assignments help you gain facility with particular writing skills. In addition, you will hone your skills by writing, revising, and again revising a paper. You will receive individual feedback during tutorial sessions.

    Required textbooks: "Line by Line: How to Improve your own Writing" Claire Kehrwald Cook, Houghton Mifflin Co. "How to Write and Publish a Scientific Paper" Robert A. Day, ISI press. "The Elements of Style" William Strunk Jr. and E. B. White, 2nd or 3rd edition, Macmillan "The Elements of Grammar" M. Shertzer, Macmillan

    Optional textbooks: "Writer's Digest Dictionary of Concise Writing". R. H. Fiske, F & W Publishers. "Winning the Games Scientists Play". C. J. Sindermann, Plenum Press

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in a Ph.D. program and Permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited to 12.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 526/Chem. 526. Chemical Biology II.

    Section 100.

    Instructor(s): A. Ramamoorthy (ramamoor@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 525. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 402 or equivalent. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Chemistry 526.100.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 532. Birds of the World.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Payne (rbpayne@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Sixteen credits of biology and permission of instructor. (4).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a comparative survey of avian systematics and the world avifauna. It provides systematic training in ornithology, particularly at the species and family level, and utilizes the research collections of birds (study skins and anatomical materials) of the Museum of Zoology. It highlights problems for research in the evolutionary systematics of birds. Testable objectives include an ability to identify birds to family or lower level and discuss their systematic relationships. Methods include lectures, demonstrations of avian diversity with the museum collections, bioacoustic analysis, library readings, and experience in independent research in systematic ornithology. Student evaluations are based on exams and papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 541/Physiology 541/Psych. 532/Cell and Developmental Biology 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Theresa M Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/physiol/541/001.nsf

    See Physiology 541.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 630/Hum. Gen. 630/Microbiol. 630/Pharmacol. 630/ Cell. & Mol. Bio. 630 Genetics Short Course.

    Section 001 ETHICS IN GENETIC MODIFICATION.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    BIOLOGY 700. Advanced Study in Biology.

    Prerequisites: 16 hours in biology, Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-8).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An introduction to research methods in biology, requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and the writing of a report.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 730. Advanced Zoological Studies.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-8).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An introduction to the research methods in zoology requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and writing of a report.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 755. Special Studies in Botany.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-6). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Students who wish to carry on independent study in some specific discipline within the field of botany may elect this course. Each student must arrange with an appropriate faculty member to have his or her study supervised. An independent study project may involve library, laboratory, or field research or any combination of these.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 801. Supervised Teaching.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Appointment as Teaching Assistant in Biology. (2; 1 credit for GSI Training course). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2; 1 credit for GSI Training course).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Seminars, demonstrations, and orientation for college teaching in biology. Available for all pre-candidate teaching assistants.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


    Undergraduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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