College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Archaeology


This page was created at 9:04 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Classical Archaeology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CLARCH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Classical Archaeology.


CLARCH 434/Hist. of Art 434. Archaic Greek Art.

Section 001 Image and Experience in the Pre-Classical Aegean

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Upperclass standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~papalexa/clasarch434.html

Following the collapse of Mycenaean culture, Greek art became largely aniconic for several centuries. This course concentrates on the reemergence of figurative arts in the Greek world from the late 9th c BCE onward. Why and under what circumstances did the Greeks reintroduce figurative images in their visual media? What is the nature of Early Greek images during a largely pre-literate stage of cultural development? What is the social function of images and how can we nowadays reconstitute the experience of viewing in the Geometric and Early Archaic periods? On what cognitive and perceptual foundations was the "hieroglyphic" nature of early Greek figuration created?

These questions will inform the working agenda of this class as we will look closely at a large number of figurative media in order to explore various important themes, such as the emergence of visual narrative, the performative role of images, the function of images as vehicles of memory, the complementarity of word and image as communicative media, and the creation of various iconographic conventions (prerequisites: Clas. Arch. 221 or Clas Civ 101, or courses of equivalent level).

Textbooks:

  • Required: Anthony Snodgrass, Homer and the Artists: Text and Picture in early Greek Art (Cambridge U Press: Cambridge 1998)
  • Coursepack available at Ulrich's and MBS
  • Recommended: W.A.P. Childs ed. Reading Greek Art: Essays by Nikolaus Himmelmann (Princeton U Press: Princeton 1998)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Regular reports and conferences required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    CLARCH 618/Hist. of Art 618. Ancient Sealing Archives: Case Studies in Archaeological Practice and Cross-Disciplinary Analysis.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See History of Art 618.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    CLARCH 633/Hist. of Art 633. Roman Numismatics.

    Section 001 Ancient & Medieval Numismatics

    Instructor(s): Alan M Stahl (amstahl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See History 638.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    CLARCH 801/Hist. of Art 801. The Orientalizing Phenomenon in the Greek World of the Early First Millennium BCE.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    During the last few decades an overwhelming wealth of archaeological evidence and recent studies have emphasized afresh the inseminating role of the Orient to various aspects of Early Greek culture and society. Operating within a revisionist mindset, some scholars have even proposed that the Orient should be given the credit traditionally bestowed to the Greeks for many of their valued cultural achievements. In addition, historical studies of the Greek world in the first millennium BDE tend to place its role within a broader perspective of cultural energies originating throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. In view of these developments, the course seeks to evaluate the current understanding of the Orientalizing phenomenon by means of a direct confrontation with material and non-material evidence alike and their poluvalent nature. A set of problems will be at the forefront of our inquiry: How do we precisely define the Orientalizing phenomenon and the various manifestations of it? What is the analytic potential of the usually vague terms "influence," "exchange," "cultural borrowing," to name just a few? What was the social function of oriental styles, motifs and themes in art and literature alike? What is the role of Crete and Cyprus as mediating environments between East and West but also between the Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age? To what extent our conceptualization of the "Orient" as the origin of the "exotic" or the "other" reflect those prevalent among the Greeks in the Early Iron Age? Moreover, particular attention will be paid to bodies of material largely untouched by recent studies (e.g., the Daedalic style in Early Greek Art, the Idaean type shields), themes (e.g., figuration and its performative content), and areas (e.g., the archaeology of the non-Greeks in the Aegean). Last but not least, and against the prevailing trend of contemporary scholarship, the problem of recovering the "non-oriental" culture of Greece in the Early Iron Age will be of some concern, if only to challenge those approaches which tend to scoop uncritically all aspects of Greek culture under the "Orientalizing" rubric.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    CLARCH 890/Hist. of Art 890. Problems in Greek Archaeology.

    Section 001 Evolution of Old World States and Empires in Comparative Perspectives. Meets with Cultural Anthropology 683.003.

    Instructor(s): John Cauclner Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu) , Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The origins, evolution, and nature of ancient states have always constituted central problems of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists, but in recent years they have undergone radical critique. For some, the very term "evolution" should be abandoned as unaceptably linear and teleological. In any case, the scale and representation of political power in ancient states is being re-evaluated, as are the ways polities manufactured sovereignty. The material dimensions of social life are now assessed as part of social practices which are inscribed in space.

    This seminar will consider modern studies on state formation, social structure and change in early states, with a primary emphasis on Old World cases, and on ancient Mesopotamia and Greece in particular. We will discuss a few classic articles and critique previous views, as background for understanding why this field is where it is now. There will also be a modest review of some very recent literature, with readings (for example) from The Archaeology of City-States (ed. Nichols and Charlton, 1997), Archaic States (ed. Feinman and Marcus, 1998), Archaeological Theory (Johnson, 1999), A Comparative Study of Thirty City-State Cultures (ed. Hansen, 2000), and Order, Legitimacy, and Wealth in Early States (ed. Richards and Van Buren, 2001). Comparative material from other early states of interest to seminarians will be introduced as the seminar proceeds (e.g., Egypt, Indus Valley, China, Africa, Maya, Teotihuacan, South America).

    The organization of the seminar will be as follows. Articles or book chapters will be assigned weekly, with each student taking responsibility for leading discussion of one piece of writing. Toward the later part of the academic term, there will be a two-week hiatus, in which students will consult with the instructors about their term papers (on topics chosen previously, according to individual interests). Drafts of term papers will be circulated to all students a few days prior to their discussion by all members of the seminar; final versions, revised in light of critical response, will be due at the end of the academic term. (N.B. Students may enrol under either the Anthropology or the Classical Archaeology course number; we will, however, meet together as a single seminar.)

    For further information, contact either:
    N. Yoffee (Depts. of Near Eastern Studies/Anthropology), nyoffee@umich.edu
    J. Cherry (Dept. of Classical Studies/IPCAA), jcherry@umich.edu

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    CLARCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    CLARCH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Instructor(s): Susan E Alcock

    Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    CLARCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


    Undergraduate Course Listings for CLARCH.


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