College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Communication Studies


This page was created at 9:05 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Communication Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMM

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Communication Studies.


COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (3-4). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Prerequisites: Permission of department. (3-4). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for original, individualized student research under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with the faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 484/Poli. Sci. 420. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Mary Young (mmyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mmyoung/communicationstudies484-syllabus.html

This course focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. The interaction between the press, politicians, and the public during political campaigns receives detailed attention. Topics include: how news is made; campaign strategies; political advertising effects; relations between Congress, the President, and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

Participation: Students are strongly encouraged to attend class. Participation is evaluated in the discussion section. Participation, however, means more than coming to class and section. Students should be prepared to present their own ideas, raise issues, ask informed questions, bring materials to class as requested, and make other contributions to the discussion.

Attendance: Attendance is strongly recommended. Material not included into the texts or the course pack will be included in lecture. Lecture notes are not available from the instructor, and students will be held responsible for material presented in class. Missing more than two discussion sections will adversely affect your participation grade.

EVALUATION:
Midterm 30%;
Final Exam 30%;
Participation 10%;
Paper Outline 5%;
Term Paper 5%;
Revised Term Paper 15%;
Reflection Papers 5%

Reflection papers: Students will assigned three 1 to 2 page reflection papera. The exact dates and subjects of these papers will be announced during the course of the semester. These reflection papers will focus on the intersection between the content of the course and contemporaneous real world events. Detailed instructions for the completion these reflection papers will be handed out in class and/or section.

Term Paper: The term paper will be between 12 and 15 pages in length. Detailed instructions for completing the term paper will be made available in the 2nd week of the semester.

Reading Materials: Mass Media and American Politics by Doris Graber. Coursepack: Available at Ulrich's

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 485/Soc. 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nojin Kwak (kwak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/comm/485/001.nsf

This course explores enduring research questions concerning mass communication and public opinion. Important normative and conceptual issues (e.g., the role of the press in a democratic society; the susceptibility of citizens to media influence; the differentiation of mass, crowd, and public; the relationship of attitudes to opinions) are first identified and examined by reviewing writings in social philosophy and social science. These issues are then investigated further through a review of relevant research in sociology, political science, social psychology, and mass communication. Emphasis is given to recent research dealing with the impact of the media on public opinion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 620/Pol. Sci. 620. Research in Politics and the Mass Media.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas A Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the seminar is to introduce students to the research literature in several selected areas of the general field of politics and the mass media. There is an emphasis on electoral politics and public opinion, but other topics are covered as well. The course begins with a consideration of how the news is made. Having developed this understanding, we move on to consider how elites craft communication strategies in order to influence other elites and the public. The last part of the course focuses on the ways the public is affected by these strategies. New research on group centered political strategies, new communication technologies, and social capital will be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

COMM 699. First-Year Research Project.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Instructor permission. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are required to begin a research project during their first year with the goal of completing it by the end of the fall term their second year. The project must be written up in the form of an article suitable for submission to a journal although publications is not an explicit part of the requirement. During the 2nd year, the student will present the results of the project to the program proseminar.
First year students are assigned an initial advisor with whom to work. The first-year project may be conducted collaboratively with that faculty member and such collaborative research is strongly encouraged. However, students may conduct more independent projects or collaborate with other faculty members if they wish.
Students will begin discussing the First Year Research Project with their advisor in the fall term of their first year. They will register for the First Year Research Project (CS 699) with the faculty member with whom they are collaborating during both the winter academic term of their first year and the fall academic term of their second year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 773. Media Culture and Society.

Section 001 Meets with American Culture 699.007.

Instructor(s): Derek W Vaillant (dvail@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides graduate students with an introduction to the various theoretical approaches to conceptualizing the power and effects of the mass media that have emerged since the 1920s. The course covers both "American" and "European" approaches to studying media content and effects and considers the strengths and weaknesses of both traditions. We will begin with the stimulus-response notions of media effects that emerged in the 1920s and review how this model was refined, overhauled and repudiated during the 1930s and 1940s, especially by Paul Lazarsfeld, Robert Merton, Herta Herzog and others. We will also study the Frankfurt School, the writings of Antonio Gramsci, and their subsequent influence on media studies in the 1970s and later. The course will move to the present by considering recent work in Cultural Studies that examines media power and effects. Special attention will be paid to how various scholars have applied a range of theories to their own content analyses and readings of television, advertising, film and popular music.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 783. Research Methods II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard L Allen (yebo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is the second part of the two-part research methods and design series. Together, the courses are designed to provide students with an introduction to the logic and techniques of social scientific research in mass communication in its varied and multiple manifestations. The seminar will address: (a) methods of framing research questions in communication and (b) techniques of gathering and interpreting observations (both qualitative and quantitative) in an effort to answer a wide range of research questions.
Moreover, this course aims at enabling students to evaluate critically the validity of communication research findings and conclusions. In completing this two-part seminar, it is expected that the students will acquire an adequate background in communication research methodology to pursue their own ideas, if they choose, from initial conceptualization of the research question to the final conclusions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 799. Directed Study.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 001 STRUCTURAL & HIERARCHICAL MODELING IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES. Meets with Psychology 988.003.

Instructor(s): L Rowell Huesmann (huesmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/comm/810/001.nsf

In this seminar we will examine the practice of using linear structural models and hierarchical linear models and growth curve models to test theories about social and developmental processes with longitudinal data. Some published research utilizing such models will be examined, but the emphasis will be on understanding the logic and utility of such models and on acquiring the skills needed to use these techniques. The theoretical bases of the techniques will be discussed as they relate to the appropriate use and interpretation of the methods. However, this seminar will not focus on the mathematical foundations of the techniques. No advanced mathematics is required, but Psychology 613 and 614 or equivalents are recommended prerequisites. Modeling problems and exercises will be assigned weekly.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 810. Seminar in Communication.

Section 002 NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY.

Instructor(s): Russell Nueman (RNeuman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar introduces the student to the field at communication technology and policy. It is designed to give those who do not have a background in this area an accessible overview of the literature. For those with professional and scholarly interests in the field, it should provide the grounding for further coursework.

We focus on how changes in technology interact with the institutions of mass communication, telecommunications and public policy in modern society. The course addresses the intersection of the three domains communications technology, public policy and economics. We will review how the fundamental physics of digital communications is changing the way in which information is created, formatted, stored, and transmitted. We examine the convergence of the once separate spheres of telecommunications, broadcasting, publishing, and computing as they collide into single, rapidly changing, and chaotic intersection of the public and private worlds. A key theme throughout will be how the growth of the Internet interacts with other technologies, institutions, and traditions of mass and interpersonal communication.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 900. Preliminary Examination Preparation.

Prerequisites: Pre-doctoral standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/comm/GradHandbook/prelimexams.htm

When all course requirements have been met and the First Year Research Project has been satisfactorily completed, the student may begin preparation for the three preliminary written examinations. Students can register for an individual study course, CS 900: Preliminary Examination Preparation, for up to six credit hours. This course is taken under the supervision of the faculty advisor and is meant to give the student an opportunity to review the readings that will be covered on the exams. Students are expected to complete their preliminary exams by the end of their third year.

NOTE: Students must be registered during the term they take a preliminary exam. If an exam is completed while a student is not registered, the graduate school will NOT advance the student to candidacy.

Preliminary examinations are an important means by which the examining committee determines whether a student is adequately prepared to conduct advanced scholarly research and to teach college-level courses in the field. Such preparation includes mastery of a substantial body of knowledge within the field. A preliminary examination is not intrinsically different from a good course examination, but the scope is broader. Expectations about a student's ability to integrate and synthesize the literature in the field are also greater.

The Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program in Mass Communication requires preliminary examinations in three areas: Communication Theory; Research Methods; A Supporting Area, reflecting a student's interdisciplinary interests as incorporated in the design of this area of the curriculum

Students should be familiar with the principal literature of each field in which they are being examined; any trends in the findings, approaches, or methodologies; and the main conflicts in interpretations that have arisen. They will be expected to organize and classify information, to discuss the relationship between ideas and phenomena, and to generalize on the basis of relevant evidence about central issues in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMM 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Susan J Douglas (sdoug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for COMM.


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