College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Economics


This page was created at 9:06 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Economics
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ECON

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Economics.


ECON 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Gerson (jgerson@umich.edu), Kai-Uwe Kühn (kukuhn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (4). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/classes/Econ401_W01/

This course deals with the theoretical analysis of consumers, firms, markets, and price determination. The analysis is rigorous, using the tools of algebra, geometry, and elementary calculus in constructing models. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. Economics 401 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is not recommended that 401 and 402 be taken in the same term. Main lecture will meet twice a week. Sections will meet twice a week.

Textbooks:
Intro Micro 5th Ed Varian
Workouts in Intermediate Micro 5th Ed Bergstrom

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ECON 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Neil Harold Buchanan (nbuchana@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (4). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/classes/Econ402_W01/

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies.

Econ. 402 is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s), written exercises, and final exam. Economics 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in Economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take Economics 401 before 402.

Textbooks: Age of Diminished Expectations 3rd ed Kurgman MIT Press 0-262-61134-1

Macro w/Macrobytes package Mankiw VHPS

Study Guide & Workbook Kaufman 1-57259-645-7

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ECON 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Philip Howrey (eph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102 and Math. 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 405 or Stat. 250, 265, 311, 350, 400, 402, 405, or 412. (4). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis. There are two lectures and one problem session per week. Grades are based on problem sets and exams. The course, which is self-contained, does not serve as a prerequisite to Economics 406.

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ECON 405/Stat. 405. Introduction to Statistics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Ryan (tpryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Math. 116 or 118. Juniors and seniors may elect this course concurrently with Econ. 101 or 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 265, 311, or 412. Students with credit for Econ. 404 can only elect Econ. 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Principles of statistical inference, including: probability, experimental and theoretic derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression.

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ECON 406. Introduction to Econometrics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shinichi Sakata (ssakata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 405 or Statistics 426. (4). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~ssakata/econ406/index.html

Econometrics consists of statistical methods commonly used in empirical economic research. With the basics of statistics and probability covered in Economics 405, Economics 406 proceeds to an in-depth treatment of the theory and practice of multiple regression analysis.

The course begins with the multiple regression model under ideal conditions and then goes on to detailed consideration of departures from the ideal conditions as well as a brief introduction to nonlinear regression models. The 405-406 sequence covers econometrics in greater depth and breadth than Economics 404. Students electing Economics 406 should have completed Math 116, Economics 101-102, and either Economics 405 or Statistics 426. Grade will be based on exams and homework exercises.

Textbook: Introductory Econometrics: A Modern Approach 2000 Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. S-Western College Publishing

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ECON 411. Monetary and Financial Theory.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001 Corporate Financial Theory: Economic and Financial Principles.

Instructor(s): Phil Shively

Prerequisites: Econ. 402, and 404 or 405. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/411/001.nsf

This academic term, Economics 411 will focus on the economic and financial principles underlying corporate financial theory. It will not cover monetary theory. Specifically, we will examine the corporate investment and financing decisions in detail. Topics will include the time value of money, valuing debt and equity, net present value analysis, risk vs. expected return, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, the capital structure decision, the dividend decision, mergers and acquisitions, and options.

This course is designed to develop your analytical skills. Therefore, an emphasis will be placed on solving the quantitative, end-of-chapter problems in addition to addressing the theoretical aspects of corporate financial theory.

The topics covered in this course complement those covered in Economics 435: Financial Economics. Students interested in modern financial theory are encouraged to take both classes.

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ECON 431. Industrial Organization and Performance.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dmitriy L Stolyarov (stolyar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 401. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is twofold: to introduce the students to the concepts and analytical tools that help analyze the market structures and firms' behavior and regulatory policies that promote effective competition.

In the first part of the course, we will study how the product markets are defined, how the sellers interact with other sellers and potential entrants, and how firms determine their price policy, sales and promotion.

In the second part, we will address specific aspects of firm behavior such as advertising, choice of quality and durability, pricing and marketing tactics. For each of these topics we will discuss the relevant legal structure governing and monitoring the industry and the economic rationale behind these regulatory policies.

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ECON 432. Government Regulation of Industry.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 401. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/432/001.nsf

This course describes and analyzes the efforts of governments to control the market power of business enterprises. Topics include dominant position, oligopolistic cooperation, vertical restraint, and merger. Emphasis is placed on American policies, especially antitrust law and regulation by administrative commission. Economics 431 is not required. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions.

Textbooks: Industrial Economics: Economic Analysis & PP 2nd ed Martin, Stephen Prentice Hall 0-02-376786

Economics of Regulationa nd Antitrust 3rd ed Viscusi, Vernon MIT Press

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ECON 435. Financial Economics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Econ. 401 and 405. (4). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/435/001.nsf

The financial economics course provides the student with an examination of a wide array of financial instruments and institutions in today's global marketplace. In taking this course, you will develop an understanding of the numerous money-market and capital market instruments and rates, the determinants of equity and bond values, and the workings of various financial markets. Financial derivatives, specifically futures and options, are introduced and their relationship to portfolio management and hedging strategy is analyzed.

The course introduces the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Markowitz diversification, duration and bond portfolio management, and the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. As part of the coursework, you will apply the concepts presented in class and investigate the fundamental components that determine the value of major U.S. corporations.

Text:

  • Capital Markets: Institutions and Instruments, 2nd ed., Fabozzi & Modigliani

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    ECON 454. Economics of Japan.

    Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gary R Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Analysis of Japan's economic organization, structure, and performance. Special emphasis is placed on the character of the Japanese financial system, the behavior of Japanese enterprises, the Japanese labor force, and the Japanese household. There will also be ample discussion of Japan's international economic relations. Attention will be given to bilateral and multilateral conflicts in overseas product, financial, and technology markets. The class has a lecture format, but questions are welcomed. Course grade will be determined by two one-hour exams and a final.

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    ECON 466. Economics of Population.

    Economic Development

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jennifer L Ward-Batts

    Prerequisites: Econ. 401. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An introduction to economic analysis of demographic behavior. The course uses an economic perspective to analyze the dramatic changes in fertility, mortality, and marriage in recent decades in both industrialized and developing countries. Data on demographic and economic trends for a wide variety of countries are used throughout the course. The course demonstrates recent innovations in the application of microeconomic theory to demographic behavior, including fertility, marriage, and migration. Students are also introduced to basic techniques of demographic measurement and mathematical demography. Topics include the economic consequences of the baby boom, the effects of an older age structure on the social security system, and the relationship between population growth and natural resources. Computer-based exercises are used to illustrate economic and demographic concepts and examine empirical evidence from a variety of populations. Students write a paper providing an economic-demographic analysis of their home community or other geographic area. Other coursework includes problem sets, short writing assignments, and the midterm and final examinations.

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    ECON 476/AAS 457. Political Economy of Black America.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 101. AAS 201 recommended. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/476/001.nsf

    See CAAS 457.001.

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    ECON 483/Poli. Sci. 482. Positive Political Economy.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 401. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/classes/Econ483/

    This course is an introduction to game theory and its application in political science. Fundamental solution concepts in game theory are first introduced by classroom experiments, then by rigorous mathematical analysis. Voting, legislative rules, bargaining, and other political processes will be modeled and analyzed using game theory.

    Textbooks: Positive Political Economics 2000 Burnham, Terry Harper Collins 0-738-20230-4

    Game Theory for Political Scientists 1994 Morrow Princeton 0-691-03430-3

    Political Theory Primer 1992 Ordeshook Taylor 0-415-90241-X

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    ECON 491/Hist. 491. The History of the American Economy.

    Economic History

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 101 and 102. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/econ/491/001.nsf

    This course is designed to introduce students to major issues and topics in the history of the American Economy from colonization to the late 20th century. A course goal is to uncover the determinants of the evolution of the U. S. economy from one of scattered settlement communities to the largest economy in the world. The class format includes lectures, discussions and films. Major topics include Economics and History, American Economic Growth, The Colonial Economy and the American Revolution, Regional Economic Development, The Civil War and Aftermath, Industrial Capitalism, and the Great Depression and New Deal. Grading is based on a midterm exam and a final exam.

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    ECON 499. Independent Research.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Prerequisites: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the economics concentration advisor. (1-4). No more than four credits may be used in an economics concentration program. Rackham credit requires additional work. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

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    ECON 502. Applied Macroeconomics.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George E Johnson (gjohnson@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 402 and Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A course designed for students in the MAE program. Approximately one-third of the course is spent reviewing and elaborating on standard macro theory of the sort covered in an advanced undergraduate course. The remainder of the time is spent on applications of this theory to problems of stabilizing aggregate demand, unemployment and inflation, economic growth, and macroeconomics of open economies. Students will normally do a computer project involving hypothesis testing or model simulation.

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    ECON 540/Public Policy 540. International Economic Policy.

    International Economics

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 555. Presumes prior or concurrent knowledge of intermediate macroeconomics. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/PUBPOL542page.html

    See Public Policy Studies 540.

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    ECON 556/Public Policy 556. Macroeconomics.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/spp556page.html

    See Public Policy Studies 556.001.

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    ECON 571/Public Policy 571. Applied Econometrics.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kevin A Clarke

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 571.001.

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    ECON 571/Public Policy 571. Applied Econometrics.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): Paul Rilstone

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 571.002.

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    ECON 573/Public Policy 573. Benefit-Cost Analysis.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kerwin K Charles (kcharles@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 555. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Public Policy Studies 573.001.

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    ECON 586/Public Policy 741. Principles of Finance & Global Financial Markets.

    Monetary and Financial Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kathryn Mary Dominguez (kathrynd@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing, Permission of instructor and IPPS 555 or Econ. 501. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~kathrynd/spp741page.html

    See Public Policy Studies 741.001.

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    ECON 599. Special Tutorial.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 603. Microeconomic Theory III.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ennio S Stacchetti (ennio@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ 600, 601, 602. Graduate standing. (1.5).

    Credits: (1.5).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    General Equilibrium. Exchange economies; production economies; the 2X2 model. Existence and welfare theorems. Positive theory of equilibrium. General equilibrium under uncertainty, including incomplete markets. Possibly nonWalrasian notions of equilibrium.

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    ECON 604. Microeconomic Theory IV.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ennio S Stacchetti (ennio@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ 600, 601, 602, 603. Graduate standing. (1.5).

    Credits: (1.5).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Incentives and Welfare. Market power. Adverse selection, moral hazard, and principal-agent models. Mechanism design, optimal auctions. Social choice theory.

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    ECON 605. Macroeconomic Theory I.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): John P Laitner (jlaitner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ 600. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 609. Advanced Methods for Economists.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Miles S Kimball (mkimball@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ 600, 601, 602, 603, 604. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 612. Stabilization Policy.

    Other Topics in Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Barsky (barksy@umich.edu), Miles S Kimball

    Prerequisites: Economics 611. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 618. Game Theory.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001 Uncertainty and Information.

    Instructor(s): Lones A Smith (lones@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 609. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lones/teach.html

    This course explores how Bayesian rational people behave under uncertainty, largely in dynamic matching and learning envrionments. The topics are wholly selfish, revolving around my past and current research in dynamics: a risk and information theory foundation, individual and social learning, financial timing, and matching models, most with search.

    Pre-reqs. Some game theory from core micro course is assumed in this course, but it is not essential to 90% of the course. First year PhDs can take the course. The section in Econ 617 on supermodularity is useful to know, but I will first summarize it for those who missed Ennio's class. The main advantage conferred by second or higher year status is intellectual maturity, and an ability to leap tall buildings in a single bound.

    Grading. For a grade, the major course credit hurdle is a scheduled final exam, worth 60% of the grade. The rest of the grade comes from four problem sets, due Mondays: February 5, February 26, March 19, and April 13. Prospective exam/prelim takers should seriously solve them, since those who don't solve problems simply don't learn Theory! My (usually joint) papers often start out out as assignments or exams. Depending on class size, I might replace one assignment with a presentation requirement of a key ( } ) paper.

    Texts. No modern uncertainty text exists. Ross (recommended) is a fun reference on stochastic dynamic programming. Topkis is "required", even though I largely summarize its content; you will need it also for game theory 617. My papers are on my web page, at http://www.umich.edu/~lones/papers.html. Books below are on reserve.

    • Morris DeGroot, Optimal Statistical Decisions. 1970.
    • Sudhakar Dharmadhikari and Kumar Joag-dev, Unimodality, Convexity, and Applications. Academic Press, 1988.
    • Jack Hirshleifer and John Riley, The Analytics of Uncertainty and Information, Cambridge University Press, 1992.
    • Samuel Karlin. Total Positivity, vol. 1, Stanford University Press. 1968.
    • Sheldon Ross, Introduction to Stochastic Dynamic Programming. Academic Press, 1983.
    • Marshall and Olkin, Inequalities: Theory of Majorization and its Applications, Academic Press, 1979.
    • Moshe Shaked and George Shanthikumar, Stochastic Orders and their Applications, Academic Press, 1994.
    • F Donald Topkis, Supermodularity and Complementarity, Princeton University Press, Frontiers of Economic Research Series, 1998.

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    ECON 622. Labor Economics II.

    Labor Economics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Charles C Brown (charlieb@umich.edu), Lee A Lillard

    Prerequisites: "Econ. 601, 603, 673, & 674." Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course presents recent research on a number of labor-market topics, with some emphasis on questions that are related to government policies and/or that have generated a significant empirical literature. Likely topics include labor unions, minimum wage laws, compensation policies and productivity, wage indexation, and discrimination and equal-opportunity laws.

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    ECON 632. Industrial Organizations and Public Policy.

    Industrial Organization and Public Control

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Econ. 674, 674, and 631; and Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course emphasizes antitrust policy, regulation, and public enterprise particularly in the U.S. Antitrust is the primary focus; its three main parts include the treatment of established market dominance, of mergers, and of collusion and unilateral actions against competitors. Utility regulation includes controls of prices and investment, with various side-effects on efficiency and investment policies. Deregulation is also discussed at some length. There may be coverage of social regulation, weapons buying, patents and other special cases, in addition to public enterprise.

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    ECON 659. Comparative Economics Systems I: System Models.

    Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

    Section 001

    Instructor(s): Jan Svejnar (svejnar@umich.edu), Andrew M Coleman

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course offers an overall survey of various issues and approaches to the historical process of the post-socialist transition and economic development. It consists of six parts:

  • the origin of socialism;
  • theoretical and empirical analysis of the former socialist systems;
  • major tasks of transition and reform measures;
  • transition as a process of economic development;
  • transition as a large scale institutional change;
  • recent country experience of transition.
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    ECON 664/Hist. 623. Problems in American Economic History.

    Economic History

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites: Economics 401, 402, and 405 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course covers the history of the American economy from colonial times to the present with an emphasis on demonstrating how the past continues to influence the structure of today's economy. It covers issues like American slavery, labor history, the rise of big business, the Great Depression, the industrial revolution, monetary history, demographic history and the history of technological change. Consideration is also given to topics in political economy such as war, worker discontent and government intervention.

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    ECON 667. The Economics of Population Growth.

    Economic Development

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David A Lam (davidl@umich.edu), Robert J Willis

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/~davidl/econ667/

    Reviews current knowledge on the relationship between economic and demographic behavior. Major sections of the course are: Economic theories of fertility, marriage, and divorce; economic applications of mathematical demography; economic consequences of population growth; economics of population policy.

    Outline:

    1. Introduction: Malthus and Economic-Demographic Equilibrium
    2. Economics of Fertility
    3. Career and Family
    4. Economics of Marriage
    5. Divorce and Child Support
    6. Bargaining Models and Intra-Family Allocations
    7. Non-Marital Fertility: Causes and Implications
    8. Fertility and Investments in Children in Developing Countries
    9. Altruism in the Family
    10. Economic Effects of Population Growth and Population Aging
    11. Topics in Economics of Aging

    Required work for the course consists of a take-home mid-term and a take-home final exam.

    Texts: T. W. Schultz, Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, University of Chicago, 1974; also on reserve in Foster Library and PSC Library).

    A course pack with selected required readings is available at Dollar Bill Copy Center. Required readings available through JSTOR (www.jstor.org) or directly from the course web site are not included in the course pack.

    Additional useful texts on reserve in Foster Library and PSC Library:
    Gary Becker, A Treatise on the Family, Enlarged Edition, Harvard University Press, 1991.
    T. Paul Schultz, Economics of Population, Addison-Wesley, 1981.
    Mark R. Rosenzweig and Oded Stark, editors, < a href=http://www.elsevier.com/inca/publications/store/6/0/1/1/3/2/601132.pub.htt>Handbook of Population and Family Economics, Volume 1A and 1B, North-Holland Elsevier Science, 1997.

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    ECON 669. Economy of Japan.

    Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gary R Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: "Econ. 501, 502, and 571, or equivalent." Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Structure and performance of the Japanese economy during the past 100 years. Particular emphasis is placed on the microeconomic analysis of distinctive Japanese corporate, government, and household institutions. Post-1945 Japanese economic performance is set within the context of changing global comparative advantage.

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    ECON 675. Applied Econometrics.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Economics 674. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Textbooks: Time Series Analysis 1994 Hamilton Princeton 0-691-04289-6

    Intro to Multiple Time Series Analysis 2nd ed Lutkepohl Spring-Ver 0-387-56940-5

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    ECON 677/Stat. 531. Analysis of Time Series.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): E Philip Howrey (eph@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Stat. 426. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Statistics 531.001.

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    ECON 684. Government Revenues.

    Public Finance

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu), James R Hines Jr

    Prerequisites: Econ. 601. Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Provides a positive and normative analysis of alternative government revenue sources. The first part of the course explores theoretical analyses of the incidence, efficiency costs, and distributional effects, of alternative tax systems. The rest of the course examines the implications of existing tax law in the U.S., and commonly proposed revisions in the law, for the allocation of resources in the economy.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ECON 696. Introduction to Economic Research II.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Barsky (barksy@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

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    ECON 696. Introduction to Economic Research II.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s): Lones Smith (lones@umich.edu), Bob Barsky (barsky@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lones/teach.html

    This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    ECON 700. Research.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Prerequisites: Permission of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 759. Seminar in Comparative Economic Systems.

    Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

    Section 001 Topic?

    Instructor(s): Rohini Somanathan (rohinis@umich.edu), Andrew M Coleman

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 795/REES 795/History 795/Pol. Sci. 795/Geog. 795/Russ. 795. Research Seminar in Russian and East European Studies.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 795.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    ECON 825/Hist. 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

    Economic History

    Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See History 825.

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    ECON 836. Seminar in Natural Resource Economics.

    Environmental Economics

    Section 001 Topic?

    Instructor(s): Klaas Van't-Veld (kvtveld@umich.edu) , Stephen W Salant (ssalant@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 842. Research Seminar in International Economics.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Section 001 Topic?

    Instructor(s): Gordon H Hanson (gohanson@umich.edu) , Linda L Tesar (ltesar@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 852. Seminar in Advanced Economic Theory.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001 Papers on the Frontiers of Economic Theory.

    Instructor(s): Lones Smith (lones@umich.edu), Ennio Stacchetti (ennio@umich.edu) , Emre Ozdenoren (emreo@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Exposure to some fine papers on the frontiers of economic theory.

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    ECON 864. Seminar in Economic History.

    Economic History

    Section 001 Topic?

    Instructor(s): Benjamin Remy Chabot (remy@umich.edu), Warren C Whatley

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 876. Quantitative Economics Seminar.

    Economic Theory and Statistics

    Section 001 Topic?

    Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu) , Shinichi Sakata (ssakata@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~ssakata/seminar/schedule.html

    No Description Provided

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    ECON 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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    ECON 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

    Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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    Undergraduate Course Listings for ECON.


    Page


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