College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 8:02 AM on Tue, Jan 30, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for English.


ENGLISH 401/Rel. 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001 This course no longer meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse. Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 413/Film-Video 413. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 The American Musical.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: F/V 230 or 236. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 Turning Points: Poetic Collaborations with Music & Art. Meets with Art and Design 454.001 and Music Theory 504.001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course's purpose is to bring together creative-writing students with art and musical compostion students for the purpose of creating original, collaborative works of art. While this course is primarily designed for undergraduates, we also hope to have room for two or three writers from the Master of Fine Arts program. Students in this course will attempt to work in what are essentially new, hybrid art forms performace art pieces in which each of the three art forms contributes something. The advantage for poets is that these collaborations offer the chance to attempt more multi-faceted and "edgy" collaborative work than one is likely to do when working within media that are more easily categorizable in conventional terms.

Admission is by permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 Readers as Authors, Voyeurs, and Confidants

Instructor(s): ANNE F WIDMAYER (afwidma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You're an aspiring author living in the center of the English-speaking Restoration and eighteenth-century world: London. You've tried writing in the established literary genres translations, poetry, drama, essays but you want to extend your dialogue with your audience. Finding no models for this increased author-reader exchange, you draw upon your earlier work and experiment in prose with more complicated plots and greater psychological detail. To amuse yourself, you sometimes employ a chatty authorial persona. In this section of 430, we will focus upon how writers characterize their readers as authors, voyeurs, and confidants. Readings may include: Behn's Oroonoko, Defoe's Moll Flanders, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Richardson's Pamela, Fielding's Joseph Andrews, Sterne's Tristram Shandy, Walpole's Castle of Otranto, Mackenzie's Man of Feeling, Burney's Evelina, and Austen's Persuasion. Course requirements will include vigorous participation in class discussions, reading responses, one short paper, one longer research paper, and class presentations on Restoration and eighteenth-century culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Early (earlyj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In Victorian England, 1837-1901, the novel for the first time becomes a dominant, indeed, the dominant literary genre, both articulating and shaping middle class concerns. We can, in fact, see something of ourselves in the Victorians as they addressed issues of private life in an industrial and commercial culture undergoing rapid technological change. Novels served as social and moral guides for private and public relations to explore issues of 'right conduct' in relation especially to class, race, gender, and sexuality. We will read five novels and two novellas in groupings illuminating 'the economy of culture,' 'gendered stories of progress,' 'the new epic of domestic life,' and 'exploring identity through the Gothic'. Authors include Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker. The course requires four papers, 4-5 pages each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 Satisfies the American Literature requirement of the English concentration. Meets with English 535.001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on poetry written in English from 1945 to the present. Some experience of "modern" poetry written in the first decades of this century would be very useful, but is not essential. We shall examine one full career, that of C.K. Williams (the Hopwood Reader in January) as well as key volumes of the contemporary period such as Robert Lowell's For the Union Dead, Sylvia Plath's Ariel (with Ted Hughes' responsive volume Birthday Letters), Seamus Heaney's Field Work, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, and two or more volumes from the 1990s. A course pack of prose and poetry by other figures will also be included. Two papers, a midterm and a final examination, as well as a reading journal, constitute the course requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 423.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 002 Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the concentration in English

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. Drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U.S. culture in American Drama and American Drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays, of Miller, Williams, and Hellman. Topics of class discussion will include: the emergence of a nativist theater tradition, the role of ethnicity, the situation of the female playwright, the conflict between commercial and artistic values, and the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage. Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shaped, Forbes, Lanyard Wilson, Kushner,Wang, and August Wilson.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 457/MEMS 457. Renaissance English Literature.

Section 001 The World of the Elizabethans. Meets the Pre-1830 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): William Ingram (ingram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What would your life be like if you had lived 400 years ago, if you had been born in maybe 1580 instead of 1980, entered adulthood in 1601 instead of 2001, had parents born in the 1550s instead of the 1950s? What would the world of such parents have been like? What would yours have been like?

In this course we'll aim to penetrate the Elizabethan period's costume-drama veneer and its Shakespearean aura to understand some particulars of the age, the relation of life to literature, and why it mattered. We do this with modern literature all the time; it's not a radical approach.

Elizabethan life, though as full and varied as our own, differed from ours in fundamental ways. And the literature of the period grew out of that life; it didn't flourish in a vacuum any more than our own literature does. The authors we read now Shakespeare, Marlowe, Spenser and their fellows spent their days as actively as we do. Most of them had families, aging parents, friends who weren't literary, children whom they loved and often lost; they worried about politics and the cost of living, and generally inhabited a world about which we know far too little. We'll attempt to recover some of the social, political, and economic "surrounds" of their lives and try to discover how or if such understanding enriches our reading of the texts they produced.

We'll read some of the basic texts that anyone should know from the period before 1600, and try to understand them in terms of the prevailing culture, and we'll do all this in a spirit of free enquiry but predicated on your readiness to care about the material. We'll do a prescribed amount of writing and will pay close attention to it. We'll also do a lot of talking in class and will pay attention to that as well, making it as intelligent and responsible as we can. And we'll have a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Three Modern American Poets: Pound, Eliot, and Stevens. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine what three major writers Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens have to teach us about the kinds of relations possible among art, society, and individual experience. We will consider their chief works both in themselves and as responses to personal, political, and literary problems such as the construction of modernism, the impact of two world wars and the psychological problems of twentieth-century life. The readings are primarily poetry, both lyrics and longer works like Pound's Mauberley sequence, Eliot's Waste Land, and Stevens's Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction with some critical prose by the authors themselves. We proceed by a mixture of lecture and discussion. There are two papers (about six pages each) and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 002 U.S. Culture of the 1950s. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Julian Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines diverse currents of American literature, film, music, and cultural criticism from the 1950s a decade that witnessed America's emergence as a global "superpower." The works under discussion will be examined in relation to key social and historical phenomena, such as the rise of the Cold War, the expansion of the middle class, the "re-domestication" of women after the war, and the beginning stages of the Civil Rights movement. The writers we will consider include Mary McCarthy, Norman Mailer, Richard Wright, Irving Howe, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and Jack Kerouac. We will also listen to selected Jazz recordings and view representative anti-Communist and "liberal conscience" films. Students will write one short paper (2-3) and one long paper (8-10); there will also be a midterm and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Jane Austen in Context. Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will do a careful reading of Austen's six major novels along with (a) some of the novels by women of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century that she herself read; (b) other kinds of writings about women from Austen's era, such as feminist and anti-feminist tracts, conduct books, and letters; (c) selected essays in social and cultural history. We will also view and discuss one or two of the recent film versions of her novels, in order to explore what Jane Austen means in our context as well as her own. Texts will be Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion; Burney, Evelina, Wollstonecraft, Maria and/or A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest; plus a course pack. The class will combine lively lectures and livelier discussion; students will write one paper, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final. NOTE: the reading for this course will be heavy; students might want to read Frances Burney's Evelina (Oxford UP) over winter break.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Staging History: Shakespeare on Legitimacy and Rebellion. (Drop/Add deadline=January 24).

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (1). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The special occasion of this course is the residency at the University of Michigan during March of 2001 of the Royal Shakespeare Company, arguably the world's premier classical company. During that residency, the RSC will present, as a unit, for the first time in the Company's history, Shakespeare's first history tetralogy: Henry VI, Parts 1,2,3, and Richard III. These plays explore patterns of meaning which might be elicited from a hugely violent and nearly chaotic period of English history, and embody Shakespeare's progress as a dramatist, poet, and delineator of human character from his earliest work to the astonishing achievements of Richard III.

The course will help prepare those who wish to see the plays. It will give a chance to learn from a range of experts at Michigan and from the RSC. Professor Williams' own lectures will be partner to presentations by (among others) Professors Eriksen, Mullaney, Potter, Schoenfeldt, Traub and Walsh and by personnel from the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Reading: Henry VI 1,2,3, and Richard III Writing: One essay (8-l0 pp.); perhaps a final examination

Note: given the special occasion of the RSC residency, this course will especially be open to visitors from the University and the community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Doing Things with Theory

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course asks about theory as a form of action. Is theory, as naysayers have argued, an entertaining but inconsequential meddling in cultural habits and values? Or does theory clarify who we are and how we might do well to act? Many who ask such questions hope to establish whether politicized theoretical approaches from Marxism and feminism to queer theory and multiculturalism constitute forms of activism. But a still more fundamental question lies in our way: can theory alter ways of thinking and, if so, can it guide our ways of acting? This course spotlights desires and assumptions that underwrite key modern theoretical arguments in order to illuminate our own motives in theorizing about literature. We read a few authors from the 1800s (e.g., Coleridge, Mill) but emphasize theory statements of the last few decades. Probable assignments: response papers and short critical papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu), Adela N Pinch

Prerequisites: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 506. Structure of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English is the stuff from which our literature is made, and language is a fundamental part of our social selves. As writers (and teachers of writing) we invite and evaluate the writing of others; as readers of literature, we interpret the texture of English, past and present. Knowing something about the language is a fundamental part of graduate study in our field, and English 506 offers an introduction to a wide range of inquiry partly on the interests of those who enroll. For some, this course will be the beginning of a career in language study; for others it will give a foundation for better informed reading and writing. Topics may include: the historical development of English; contemporary regional, social, and gender-based varieties; the language of literature. We will learn something about the resources for the study of language (which range from dictionaries on historical principles like the OED to huge computer files of English usage), and we will devote some time to questions of research methodology applicable to a broad range of topics within the field of English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 522. History of Literary Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be a survey of some of the key movements and texts in contemporary literary theory, with some attention to their nineteenth-century roots. Coverage will include: post-structuralism, materialism, feminism, psychoanalysis, cultural studies, post-colonial theory, and queer theory. Major texts are likely to include works by Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Raymond Williams, Anne McClintock, Eve Sedgwick, and Judith Butler. There will also be a substantial course pack with supplementary essays, and a theoretical anthology (probably Rivkin and Ryan's Literary Theory).

Though the course will be organized as a survey, we will also use a few key literary texts as reference points for the theoretical work we explore, and there will also be time devoted to the development of contemporary critical practices that integrate various theoretical impulses. We will use as models for this a number of essays by contemporary literary critics. To combat the danger of perfunctory, relentless critique always a risk in surveys of theory we will focus on some of the more extravagant and suggestive texts by the major figures listed above, and we will attend more to their critical potentials than to their inevitable shortcomings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 526. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 American Literature in the Academy. MEETS WITH AMERICAN CULTURE 520.001.

Instructor(s): June M Howard (jmhoward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do we mean when we say "American literature"? When did people start thinking there was such a thing? What role do academies from elementary schools to graduate schools play in defining it? Has it really changed in the past twenty years?

This course designed as an inquiry into its topic, not the presentation of a set of claims examines American literary studies as a disciplinary formation. We will consider its intellectual history, its institutional history, and its present situation. Specific concerns include: the development of colleges and universities in the United States; the cultural politics of "national" literatures and of "literature" as an object of study; the relation of American literary studies to English Departments and to American Studies and other interdisciplines such as African-American Studies and Women's Studies; and the state of the academic profession at the present moment. (When possible, we will include events such as Departmental job talks as part of our investigation.) The course will, in other words, take an interdisciplinary approach to a particular case in the production of knowledge. It should appeal especially to students studying literature in English or the cultures of the United States, but is designed to be useful to anyone interested in critical reflection on disciplinarity and the practices which produce and legitimate academic discourses.

Class meetings will proceed primarily by discussion, and students will have considerable latitude in designing their projects for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 535. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 Meets with English 441.001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 441.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 540. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 False Documents: The Art and Science of Simulation. (3 credits). Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 543. Literature of the Jacobean and Caroline Period.

Section 001 Renaissance Poetry.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read a wide range of poetry, largely lyric, from Wyatt and Surrey in the early sixteenth century through Milton, Dryden, and Katherine Philips in the later seventeenth century. We will work to situate poems amid the careers and historical tensions of their authors, but we will aspire to keep questions of form and genre well in our sights. Why, we will ask, might a writer choose to articulate desire in formally patterned language? Is literary form the necessary vehicle, or the constricting straitjacket, of desire? How do issues of class and gender mark lyric utterance? How does the imagined audience of a poem alter its expression and meaning? Is there a politics of lyric form in the early modern period?

Requirements include attendance, participation, one short and one longer paper, and various in-class reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 546. Literature of the Romantic Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as an introduction to the period-concept, "Romanticism," and to the texts that gave rise to that concept. Because the concept of Romanticism that emerged from the late 19th century to the late 20th privileges poetry, we too center our work on the poetry, and because Wordsworth figures within that period-concept as exemplary (Arnold's appraisal set the tone for the next hundred years), we devote the first half of the term to finding in Wordsworth's poetry and prose the terms and topics that organized the understanding of the work of Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron. Our study will focus on the formal innovations of the poetry as the means by which certain philosophical and broadly political projects were conducted. The emergence of the aesthetic as a distinctive set of values and practices designed to do the work of cultural reform at the level of individual consciousness and feeling will be taken as coterminous with the topic of Romanticism itself. Readings include essays by both German Romantic writers and British essayists of the period, and a large portion of the British and American scholarship that invented the Romanticism so strongly contested by our own scholarly moment. We will also read Fredric Jameson's Marxism and Form and some essays by Theodor Adorno and Herbert Marcuse so as to acquaint ourselves with a leftish, liberationist construction of the Romantic, even as we study the demystifying efforts of Jerome McGann, David Simpson, and other critics of the 1980's.

Students will present the scholarly literature in the form of 20-minute oral reports. I will suggest questions that might organize those reports in such a way as to highlight the work we'll be doing on the poetry. Writing will consist of stages and sections of the final essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 553. Twentieth Century American Literature.

Section 001 Literature Of The Holocaust.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"To write poetry after Auschwitz is a barbaric act." This line, taken largely out of context from an essay by T.W. Adorno has, for decades, set the terms of various debates about the literary responses to the Holocaust. More recently, it has been supplanted by other debates about the overlapping, sometimes conflictual, concerns of memory and history. Holocaust literature has been at the center of questions about the limits of representation. What are the connections between imaginative literature and the historical events that motivate it? How do we understand the documentary and testimonial impulse in much of Holocaust literature? How does this literature shape a contemporary sense of exile, diaspora, or home? How do these texts challenge our notions of national and linguistic borders?

We will read poetry and fiction written in English, German, Yiddish, Hebrew, French, Polish, and Italian (all in English translation; there are no language requirements for this course). Authors will be chosen from among the following: Aharon Applefeld, Jurek Becker, Tadeusz Borowski, Paul Celan, Yankev Glatshteyn, David Grossman, Ilona Karmel, Primo Levi, Cynthia Ozick, Nelly Sachs, Art Spiegelman, Avrom Sutskever, Andre Schwarz-Bart, Elie Wiesel, Binjamin Wilkomirski. Films and critical, theoretical, and historical texts inform each of our discussions. Everyone will be asked to give one oral report, write a final paper, and assume an energetic role in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 572. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Reginald Mcknight (regmc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: MFA students only. English 571. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 575. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 574. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 577. Independent Study-Creative Writing.

Prerequisites: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-semester MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in English, English and Education, or Women's Studies, and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 627. Critical Theories and Cross-Cultural Literature.

Section 001 Law And Literature. Meets with Law 741.001.

Instructor(s): James Boyd White (jbwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in rhetorical and cultural analysis, in which legal texts are read against a background of texts of other kinds, drawn from a wide variety of genres and cultural contexts. The hope is that by asking similar questions of these divergent materials they may be seen as mutually illuminating. Our questions focus upon: the kind of language a particular writer inherits, including both the terms by which it is organized and the social and linguistic practices it authorizes (this is a kind of cultural criticism); upon the writer's transformation of that language in the particular text (this is a form of aesthetic criticism); and upon the kind of community the text creates both with its reader and with those it talks about (this is a form of ethical and political criticism). The texts will vary from year to year, but have included such works as Plato's Crito, Huckleberry Finn, Billy Budd, Mansfield Park, Lincoln's Second Inaugural, and speeches by Webster. The approach is that worked out in my book, When Words Lose Their Meaning. The course requirements will depend partly on the size of the class, but there will be at least two short papers and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ENGLISH 640. Studies in Genre.

Section 001 Between Romantic and Victorian Cultures: Writing of the 1820s and '30s

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course proposes that an exciting new sense of "Nineteenth Century British Studies" is emerging in literary/cultural studies, as scholars redraw the field by questioning the divide between those old literary-historical terms, "Romantic" and "Victorian." We will see what we can contribute to this emerging field by devoting ourselves to the intensive study of writing from two decades that have traditionally disappeared into the crack between High Romanticism and High Victorianism: the 1820's and 1830's. We will explore the ways in which making visible the writings of these interstitial decades will reveal it to be an era of extraordinary innovation and experimentation, both in literary writing and various genres of non-literary writing, in which the British culture of letters was crucially transformed. Topics and texts to be explored include: the culture of poetry in the wake(s) (literally) of the Romantic poets (the fate of the "posthumous" Keats, Shelley, Byron, and Wordsworth as well as the "poetesses" of the period such as Hemans and LEL); experiments in prose fiction (Scott, Hogg, Mitford, Martineau); the discursive form of the political transformations of the 1820's and '30's (the battle for the reform bill, abolition); the emergence of new divisions of knowledge and technologies of representation during the period. The course assignments (a long annotated bibliography for example) will be geared to facilitate students' own exploration of what's "out there" in this period, and research into any realm of discourse from this period will be encouraged. Students with an interest in 19th century American literature wishing to do transatlantic projects, for example, are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of department

ENGLISH 648. Topics in the Modern Period.

Section 001 Gendering Modernism. Meets with Women's Studies 698.003.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 698.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 667. Studies in 20th Century Authors.

Section 001 Yeats/Joyce/Beckett: Poetry/Fiction/Drama

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the work of the three great Irish modernists, Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett, and focus on the impact of their work on the European and international literary and artistic community. In doing so, we will consider carefully and closely the limits and possibilities of genre as they have been expanded and exploited in their poetry, fiction, and drama. There is a lot of reading: Joyce's Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake; Yeats' major poems; Beckett's trilogy of novels, his major plays, and his late fiction. Students will be encouraged to explore their own reactions to the material before engaging in an encouter with the vast critical and theoretical discourses surrounding these works. What can we learn about the process of writing by placing the works of these authors side by side? What place do we find for these "master texts" in the writing, research, and teaching we will do in the 21st century? In order to facilitate class discussion, students will write weekly response papers; at the concluson of this busy semester, students will submit a major critical/research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 667. Studies in 20th Century Authors.

Section 002 Gender and Trauma. Meets with Women's Studies 698.002.

Instructor(s): Patricia Smith Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine a series of literary, historical, anthropological texts describing trauma, focusing on several questions: Who gets to write about trauma? Is trauma really unspeakable, unsayable? In what disciplines and genres? Are the discourses/metaphors/plots/genres for talking about AIDS different from those we use to talk about rape or genocide? Finally, what do we owe to the dead when we write about them? To answer these questions we need to understand the consumerist limits of feminist and cultural studies and to explore why the academy is so busy producing, circulating, and consuming trauma. The fact of trauma and the act of bearing witness may be ongoing preoccupations within the human condition, but it is only recently that scholars have taken up the subject in such numbers. We've turned from a re-examination of the matrix "pleasure/desire" (initiated by new trends in feminism, psychoanalysis, and poststructuralism) to a renewed focus on victimization and trauma. What roles have feminism, queer theory, and gender studies played in this transformation?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles M Baxter

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 671 or 674. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 675. Creative Writing Project.

Section 002.

Prerequisites: MFA students only; English 671 or 674. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 799. Departmental Colloquium.

Section 001 Topic?

Prerequisites: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 822. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 Transatlantic Print Culture

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar examines authors mostly of the 18th century who inhabited both Britain and North America/the Caribbean, as well as writers who did not cross the Atlantic but who wrote about Atlantic crossings, whose reputations were transatlantic, or who developed significant transatlantic intellectual networks. We will work through the material histories of trade, travel, and communications networks, emphasizing their cultural dimensions. Our conversation throughout will be enlightened by recent theoretically-informed work on print culture, genre, literacy, and literary labor. The course will center on certain key questions: What is implied in the shift from the study of national literatures to the study of "Atlanticism" or the "circum-Atlantic"? How do notions of nation and of the international or the cosmopolitan develop in relation to one another? What are the features of "transatlantic print cultures" and "transatlantic careers"? What institutions mediated cultural exchange Universities? Churches? Families? Research projects will lead to substantial individual research on largely unstudied materials, such as periodicals, newspapers, diaries, and letters. Paperback editions will be available for some of these texts, but class members should expect to buy a hefty course pack and to work with microfilm readers. We will draw on the resources of the Clements Library as well. Assignments will include weekly or bi-weekly response papers, class presentations, exercises that involve pedagogical and curatorial practices, and substantial collaborative research to be delivered as a 'conference paper' at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 Medieval Drama

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Medieval drama inhabits many contexts, from the universities of twelfth-century Paris to the guild processions of fourteenth-century York. Some plays, produced in cathedral or monastic schools, advance the cult of a saint; others parody fashionable academic theories; still others celebrate the feast of Corpus Christi. Seminar participants will engage a wide range of these texts, focusing on twelfth-century Latin works in translation and late medieval English works. Our reading list will include the Fleury Playbook (a monastic collection), the Beauvais Daniel (the product of a cathedral school), some university comedy (probably Pamphilus), the York cycle, the Croxton Play of the Sacrament, the Digby Mary Magdalene, Mankind, and some anomalous texts. Throughout most of the twentieth century, criticism of this disparate body of literature focused on theorizing generic development, appreciating formal features, establishing manuscript evidence, and recovering historical and intertextual contexts. Since the best of this work continues to shape the field, seminar participants will become familiar with the major secondary works. At the moment, however, the field is anything but moribund, and new approaches are challenging traditional understandings of the texts and their contexts. In order to explore some of these productive new directions, seminar participants will draw on challenging recent work in the field in order to explore the specific textual, cultural, and intertextual contexts of medieval drama. Course requirements include brief contributions to a collaborative survey of scholarship, oral reports and an oral presentation, and a thirty-page seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 842. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 MODERNISM AND THE MATERIAL TEXT.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 881. Seminar: Comparative or Interdisciplinary Study.

Section 001 Body Theory. Meets with Comparative Literature 791.001.

Instructor(s): Tobin Anthony Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E881.html

"We are not well advised," Stanley Cavell muses, "to inspect the population to discover who among us in fact have bodies and who have not." We all have bodies this is an indisputable fact, but not all facts are equal, and neither are our bodies. The last thirty years have seen an explosion of theoretical speculation about the body, some of it bent on showing the primacy of the body, some of it contending that the body is anything but fact. We have seen the emergence of the gendered body, the queer body, the racial body, the docile body, the body politic, the body in pain, the disabled body, the ritual body, etc. "Every body wants to get into the act," said the man with the humongous nose. This seminar will examine contemporary body theory, ranging from its origins in the human geography of psychoanalysis and the materialism of Marx to its postmodern incorporations. Some areas of special focus will be the use of human and animal bodies in art, hunger artistry, blood and the media, prosthetics, intersex identity, narcissism, ritual and exhibitionism, social constructionism, piercing, and disability studies. Headliner theorists include Georges Bataille, Judith Butler, Mary Douglas, Michel Foucault, Sander Gilman, René Girard, Donna Haraway, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Nancy Mairs, and others. Our main question throughout will be: what does body theory incorporate, and what does it not?

Books Available at Shaman Drum Book Shop, 315 South State Street:

  • Georges Bataille. The Story of the Eye. Trans. Joachim Neugroschel. San Francisco: City Lights, 1987. Also @ http://www.phreebyrd.com/~sisyphus/bataille/sstoryeye.html
  • _____. The Tears of Eros. Trans. Peter Connor. San Francisco: City Lights, 1989.
  • Peggy Zeglin Brand. Beauty Matters. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2000.
  • Katie Conboy, Nadia Medina, and Sarah Stanbury, ed. Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.
  • Michel Foucault. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Trans. Alan Sheridan. New York: Vintage 1977.
  • Mark O'Brien. The Man in the Iron Lung. Berkeley, CA: Lemonade Factory, 1997.
  • Tobin Siebers, ed. The Body Aesthetic: From Fine Art to Body Modification. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000.

Course packs for your consultation are available in the Comparative Literature Library and the English Graduate Student Lounge and include:

  • Cheryl Davis. "Disability and the Experience of Architecture." Rethinking Architecture: Design Students and Physically Disabled People. Ed. Raymond Lifchez. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.
  • Kathy Davis. "'My Body is My Art,' Cosmetic Surgery as Feminist Utopia?" European Journal of Women's Studies 4, no. 1 (1997): 23-37.
  • Mary Douglas. "The Two Bodies" in Natural Symbols. New York: Vintage, 1973.
  • Jacques Lacan. "The Mirror Stage." Ecrits. New York: Norton, 1977.
  • Nancy Mairs. "Sex and the Gimpy Girl." River Teeth 1, no. 1 (1999): 44-51.
  • Marcel Mauss. "Body Techniques." Sociology and Psychology: Essays. London: Routledge, 1979.
  • David Valentine and Riki Anne Wilchins. "One Percent of the Burn Chart: Gender, Genitals, and Hermaphrodites with Attitude." Social Text 52/53, nos. 3 and 4 (1997): 215-22.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ENGLISH 882. Seminar: Comparative Literature.

Section 001 The Culture Of Money.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing in English. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do literary and cultural studies respond to capitalist culture the dominant (but not unchallenged or unchallengable) economic modality of Europe and Euro-America for at least the past 200 years? And, specifically, how do we respond to the primary fiction of that culture the faith it asks us to extend in the real value of things that either exist in a bizarrely fetishized form (coins, dollar bills, and the like) or in no form at all (currency is more likely to be transferred by electronic blip than any other form these days)? We will be reading some theory and history to give us a handle on the problems of thinking seriously about the intersections between these fictions (albeit ones with real effects) and the ones we are more used to handling: these will include selections from Marx, Braudel, Simmel, Adam Smith and Albert Hirchman; then we will be reading fictions that center on new and old forms of economic exchange: The Jew of Malta, The Merchant of Venice, The Way We Live Now, The Great Gatsby. That ethnicity is a not-irrelevant category to the writers of these fictions will no doubt interest us a bit. In the second half of the course, we will talk about the new forms of imaginative fiction and experience that grow up around a culture in which money is not only exchanged for goods or other money, but also for information; our texts here may include such novels as The House of Mirth and The Financier. I will ask students to do a good deal of reading, to present a brief talk to their classmates as well as a short paper to me, and to write a longish term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 882. Seminar: Comparative Literature.

Section 002 Emotion and Its Discontents.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Doctoral standing in English. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Section 001.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


Page


This page was created at 8:02 AM on Tue, Jan 30, 2001.


This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.