College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 9:07 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in French
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for French.


FRENCH 462. Literature of the Sixteenth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Under the Eye of the Court: Scrutiny, Secrecy, and Personal Awareness in the Renaissance.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the French royal Court grew in size and importance, it became a place of intense competition. If one wished to leave the provinces to make something of oneself, or if one needed the immense resources only available through the Court in order to realize a project, one could not help but be drawn into the sphere of royal influence. Once there, one had to vie in a restricted space with many other aspiring courtiers; simply put, those at the court had to struggle to survive in an environment where the major entertainment consisted in watching and judging one another.

In order to cope under such strain, one needed to become more aware of oneself: for example, the necessity of controlling one's facial expression in the presence of the king and other powerful princes forced one to become more conscious of one's emotions so as to be on guard for one's spontaneous reactions. All agreed that, behind the glitter and refinement, the Court was a "social jungle". life there subjected one to constant scrutiny. To protect one's sense of dignity, many were forced for the first time in the their lives to develop a notion of their self-worth, and cultivating a richer "inner" life became a means by which to let off intense social and psychological pressure.

We will study the birth of the ideal of "sincerity" in this environment where, paradoxically, one had to hide one's intentions and dissimulate one's feelings nearly all of the time.

Grades will be based upon four papers, two exams, one presentation, and class participation.

Readings from:
Norbert Elias, La Société de Cour (Flammarion), 2-08-081144-4;
Castiglione, Le Courtier (Garnier-Flammarion), 2-08-070651-9;
Marot, 'Adolescence clémentine (Gallimard), 2-07-032405-2;
Du Bellay, Les Regrets (Gallimard), 2-07-032147-9;
Montaigne, Les Essais (Pocket), 2-266-06250-6;
Shakespeare, Hamlet (Folger Library), 0-671-72262-x;
Molière, Le Misanthrope (Classiques Larousse), 2-03-871313-8.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 601. Proseminar in French.

Section 001 – Tutorial in Old French

Instructor(s): Peggy S Mccracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers instruction in the reading of Old French. Balance between grammatical introduction/review and reading practice to be determined according to interests and needs of students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 651. Studies in Medieval Literature.

Section 001 – Promising Subjects: Performance Theory and Medieval Literature

Instructor(s): Peggy S Mccracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study selected medieval literary texts alongside speech act theory and various theories of performance. We will explore how these theories might help us to understand medieval poetics, and we will ask what insights literary texts from medieval France might offer about performance theory. We will interrogate what a promise does and how it does it; the cultural, linguistic, and poetic conditions under which a promise may be made; the way that these conditions are defined according to specific alignments of gender, class, and sexuality; and the extent to which these conditions define the promising subject. Reading assignments will include Marie de France, Eliduc, Chrétien de Troyes, Erec et Enide, Raoul de Cambrai, La mort le roi Artu, and selected short texts; essays by Austin, Felman, Derrida, Lacan, Zizek, and Butler.

Reading assignments in English and modern French; class conducted in English.

Written assignments: a series of response papers, oral presentation, research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 653. Studies in 17th Century French Literature.

Section 001 – (Un) Classical Bodies. Meets with Women's Studies 698.007.

Instructor(s): Domna C Stanton (dcs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine diverse and dissimilar constructions of the body in seventeenth-century France-a subject silenced by the traditional and post-structuralist privileging of the "classical".

We will begin by examining recent theories of the early-modern body in Bakhtin, Elias, and Lacqueur, Bordo and Reiss, but most notably (and influentially) in Foucault and his notion of "the classical" and disciplined body. These readings will inform our discussion of different – and potentially contradictory – discourses imbricated in the production of early-modern bodies over and beyond the Cartesian body: the medical (anatomical), sexual, reproductive, perverse and grotesque bodies, the social, civilized, courtly honnête body, the cross-dressed body; the rhetoric of the face and the portrait; the king's bodies; and the religious and mystical (ecstatic body).

Authors to be read include: Bourgeois, Chorier, De Grenailles, Descartes, Duval, Faret, Foigny, Guyon, Héroard, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucault, Molière, Montpensier, Paré, Pascal, Poulain de la Barre, Saint-Simon and Venette. We will also visit the collections of anatomical drawings at the Taubman Medical Library.

Class discussions will be conducted in English; readings will be in French. For those students who need it, translations will be provided wherever possible.

Work for the course will include a twenty page paper and two oral presentations (one related to team based research on a topic not covered in class readings, such as sartorial styles, the body in the visual arts, legal codes, corporeal punishment, and physical and mental illnesses and their treatment).

A prior knowledge of seventeenth-century literature and culture is recommended, but not required.

Address questions about the content and work of the course to Domna Stanton (dcs@umich.edu).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 670. African/Caribbean Literature in French.

Section 001 – Combat Literature

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In Wretched of the Earth, Frantz Fanon proposed a model of literary history in which political struggle, especially anti-colonial revolution, occupied a central role. He outlined the periods of assimilation, pre-combat literature, and combat literature. These categories were highly influential for early regional histories of Francophone literature, which were often influenced by nationalist movements as well, but the notion of combat literature has since fallen into disuse as nationalism has become increasingly discredited intellectually (though more and more a source of violence at the international level). Since colonialism and its effects, however, are far from being things of the past, this course will examine to what extent the notion of combat literature might be retrieved today. If it can be retrieved, how must we alter its definition to make it viable? Can it be as easily distinguished from other categories once thought to exclude it (such as ethnographic literature, childhood narratives, witness literature) as it once was? Do nationalist struggles have a monopoly on combat literature? Or can we include struggles against corruption and authoritarianism in post-independence nations and struggles for sexual equality? Must combat literature be confined to realist representations of revolution or works of social realism ? Is the realism in social realism as naive as it now seems to many poststructuralist critics? Why has combat literature (at least as traditionally understood) been overwhelmingly composed of works written by male writers (with a few exceptions)? Is a feminist combat literature possible?

Requirements:
There will be one term paper (with statement of topic, annotated bibliography, and rough drafts due throughout the academic term), and two presentations.

Readings:

Literary works:
Ousmane, Sembène, Les bouts de bois de Dieu (Senegal)
Mongo Beti, Remember Ruben (Cameroon)
V.I. Mudimbe, Entre les eaux (former Za•re)
Jean Sénac, "Tu es belle comme un comité de gestion" (Algeria)
Mohammed Dib, Qui se souvient de la mer (Algeria)
Assia Djebar, L'amour, la fantasia (Algeria)
Maryse Condé, Moi, Tituba, sorcière noire de Salem (Guadeloupe)
Hubert Aquin, Prochain épisode (Quebec)
Caron, Louis, Les canards de bois (Quebec)
Michèle Lalonde, "Speak White" (Quebec)
Monique Wittig, Les guérillères (France)

Theoretical works:
Frantz Fanon, "On National Culture," Wretched of the Earth
selections from Alain Robbe-Grillet, Pour un nouveau roman; Jean-Paul Sartre, Qu'est-ce que la littérature?; Terry Eagleton, Fredric Jameson, Raymond Williams, and other Marxist theorists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 899. Independent Study.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


FRENCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

FRENCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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