College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 9:08 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in German
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for German.


GERMAN 415. The German Language Past and Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rqueen/TEACHING/Ger415

The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methods of descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics and sociolinguistics and to apply these to a survey of the German language in both its current and past states. We will be concerned with the internal structure of the language; however, we will relate the internal structure to the cultural and social contexts in which the language has evolved and in which it is currently used.

We will pay particular attention to the differences between spoken and written varieties of German as well as the relationships between standard German and the many German dialects and regional standards. The class is oriented around group discussion, lectures and presentations.

Requirements include brief homework assignments and short essays, a midterm, a final term paper and an oral presentation of the final paper. Readings will be in German and English. No previous knowledge of linguistics is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck

Prerequisites: German 325/326. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 426 is devoted to enhancing the reading, speaking, writing, listening, translating, thinking, and arguing skills of advanced students. Our task this academic term will be to read a single edition of the influential German weekly Die Zeit, a newspaper that extensively covers and comments on foreign and domestic politics, economics, literature, visual arts, science, media, history, scholarship, and current topics of debate and contention. Students will take responsibility for a section of the newspaper (preparing vocabulary and background, brief presentations). Additional material will include relevant non-journalistic literature and competing coverage in papers to the left and the right of Die Zeit.

Grades will be based on attendance/participation and homework assignments (translations, article summaries, brief position papers).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 430/Bus. Admin. 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet K Vanvalkenburg

Prerequisites: German 350, or one 300-level courses beyond German 232. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goals of German 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre." This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgeably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This term, German 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies. Meets with Sociology 212.001

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). Rackham credit requires additional work. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century.

There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century, whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

In answering these questions, the course will proceed in the following manner: In the first section, we will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports. In this segment, we will see how this transformation was identical in every industrial society and should thus be seen as a fine gauge of modernity: These disorganized games become bureaucratized, ordered, codified, rule-bound by the elites and upper middle class segments of industrial societies between 1860 and 1900. However, these games, though now codified and routinized, still remain part of leisure activities of a small privileged group in society. Once, however, they become embraced by the male, industrial working class, they enter the realm of professionalism, of vocation, of commodification. The industrial working class is the subject that leads these amateur games towards professional sports and thus to an integral part of modern mass culture.

In the second part, we will look at how similar and congruous the development in the United States was with this trajectory, yet how the content emerged so differently. We will dwell briefly on what makes the United States similar and what renders it different vis-à-vis other advanced industrial democracies.

The third segment will look in detail at the four North American culturally hegemonic team sports: baseball, football, basketball in the United States; ice hockey in Canada.

The fourth part will analyze the development of soccer tellingly called "football" by the rest of the world in England.

The last section will look at the world in the context of globalization and ask whether new structures might be emerging that will challenge the old; or whether these new developments will exist alongside the old in a much less significant and culturally powerful manner.

Course Requirements: Two five-page papers on the course readings during the term; and a take-home final at the end of the course during the examination period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 KAFKA AND THE QUESTION OF AUTHORITARIAN RULE

Instructor(s): Hubert Rast

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar concentrates on late nineteenth and early twentieth century German texts that theorize political, cultural, paternal, linguistic authority. We will analyze and compare the literary, intellectual and ethical predicaments that arise when particular conditions, settings, figures and patterns are privileged. In particular, we will look into: 1) the conflicts between the individual and the totalitarian, 2) the aesthetics of conflict, 3) the relationship between literature and politics. We will read works by Franz Kafka, Robert Musil, Heinrich and Thomas Mann and Ernst Jünger. Course requirements: One or two in-class presentations; one short paper, and a term paper of about 15 pages to be written and revised during the second half of the term. The language of instruction will be German. The students' use of German for both classroom and paper is optional.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 458. German Literature after 1945.

Section 001 CONTEMPORARY MINORITY WRITERS

Instructor(s): Julia C Hell

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the topic of minority cultures in contemporary Germany. In particular, we will focus on fictional and non-fictional texts by Turkish-German (Emine Sevgi Özdamer, Aysel Özakin, Zafer Senocak, Feridun Zaimoglu) and Romanian-German authors (Herta Müller, Richard Wagner). Fringe Voices: An Anthology of Minority Writing in the Federal Republic of Germany (eds. Antje Harnisch and Friedemann Weidauer) will provide us with some of the material in English; other texts will be read in German. These readings will be complemented by articles on issues such as exile/diaspora, hybridity, and the concept of minority culture itself.

Students will be asked to contribute presentations dealing with the assigned readings on a regular basis; in addition, students will write 3 shorter essays on assigned topics in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hubert Rast

Prerequisites: Senior Honors standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, German 491. In German 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. Meets with Sociology 495.007 and Political Science 489.004.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One year beyond German 232. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will analyze a very particular form of political participation, namely the social and historical aspects of fascism and right-wing movements. What is fascism? When does it arise? Who are its supporters? Who are its beneficiaries? What is its relationship to established political institutions? Above all, what is its relationship to that ubiquitous and fascinating social process known as "modernization"? Was it a unique phenomenon "in its own time and place" (i.e., the Europe of the 1920s and 1930s) or does it continue to exist albeit bearing different names and altered disguises?

The course is divided into two sections. The first section will illuminate certain key aspects of fascism and right-wing movements in a general comparative framework. The emphasis will be on concepts and analyses rather than descriptions and events per se. Still, this section of the course will be deeply anchored in history and empirical reality. We will mainly, though not exclusively, use Germany as our empirical case during this first segment of the course.

The second section will concentrate on a few countries other than Germany, so that we can compare and contrast realities of fascism which we discussed in the first, conceptual part of the course with the help of added examples. The countries discussed will be Austria, Spain, Italy, Romania, Hungary, Argentina, Japan, and Russia. We will end the course with a discussion of the New Right forms of contemporary right-wing politics so that we can have a fine temporal comparison with the original fascism fifty years later and thus answer the question better as to whether fascism was something unique in its time or rather a larger and more lasting phenomenon of political rule.

Course requirements: There will be an in-class midterm examination. In addition, there will also be a final paper which will be due on the last day of our class meeting. The paper should be double-spaced, typed and not exceed twenty (20) pages. It should be on a topic which involves the concepts and materials used in the course. The exact topic will have to be approved by the instructor.

All books used in this course will be available at the bookstore and will also be placed on reserve in the library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 515. Introduction to Medieval Low German.

Section 001 Old Saxon

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; open to qualified undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goals of German 515 are:

  1. to provide an intensive introduction to the dialects of the northern continental lowlands from around 800 to 1400 AD, namely Old Saxon, Old Low Franconian, Middle Low German, and Middle Dutch, with emphasis on Old Saxon
  2. to explore the problem of sub-grouping among the Germanic dialects of the North Sea area, and evaluate the criteria the criteria for sub grouping in light of current theory on language change
  3. to investigate the socioeconomic factors associated with the divergence of Niederdeutsch and Nederlands in the Middle period.

An introduction to Old Saxon, as well as edited and unedited texts, maps, charts, diagrams, bibliographies, etc., will be assembled in a course pack. Additional sources will be available in the Seminar Library. Readings will include portions of the Old Saxon Heliand, the Old Saxon Genesis, charms and recipes, the Heberegister from the monastery at register from the monastery at Freckenhorst, the Old Low Franconian Psalms and Glosses, and a variety of texts from the Middle period. Participants will write a 15-20 page paper, and give several oral presentations in class. The course counts as a "Germanic Linguistics" course, for both literature and linguistics students, and is open to qualified undergraduates. There will be no written tests. Grades will be based on class participation, oral presentations, and the paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 COLONIALISM, POSTCOLONIALISM, AND GERMAN STUDIES. Meets with Sociology 595.004

Instructor(s): George P Steinmetz (geostein@umich.edu), Julia C Hell

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an interdisciplinary seminar on colonialism and postcolonialism, taught by Julia Hell (German Studies) and George Steinmetz (Sociology and German Studies). We will read social and cultural theory as well as primary cultural texts (novels, films, autobiographies). No reading knowl- edge of German is required.

The course is structured as a set of explorations of key topics within colonial and postcolonial studies, includ- ing: (1) 18th and 19th century precolonial discourse (Orientalism, racial theory, anthropology, travel litera- ture) and interventions in the precolonial setting (archaeology, exploration, missionaries); (2) Colonial sub- jectivities; (3) Space, architecture and colonialism; (4) Intra-European expansion as a form of colonialism, including German colonizing projects in Eastern Europe from the 19th century to the Nazi period; (5) Globalization, immigration, multiculturalism, and postcolonialism: an exploration of contemporary minority cultures in German and other European contexts.

The case of Germany will serve as a point of departure within each topic, from which we will explore the more familiar European colonial cases. The course rests on the premise that there are epistemological advantages to analyzing colonialism from the margins in this case, from marginal locations within the colonizing "core," rather than marginal locations in the colonized or postcolonial periphery. Germany's sometimes peripheral location in these processes provides a new perspective, revealing both the heterogenity of colonialism and postcolonialism, as well as certain surprising similarities to the more familiar British and French cases. The last third of the course will be set aside for student presentations and outside visitors. In this part of the course, the emphasis will be on pursuing the key topics in non-German contexts (students can of course focus on the German case as well).

The course can be taken for full credit or as a registered "visitor." Students who enroll in the course for a grade are expected to present an oral commentary on one or more of the presentations, and to write a final paper, which they will present in the final weeks of the course. Students regularly, to participate in the weekly sessions, and to provide the commentary on one or more of the readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Gender, Body, and Sexuality in Early Modern and Modern Europe. Meets with History 621.001

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu), Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 621.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 841. Seminar: Studies in German Literature.

Section 001 INTRODUCTION TO IDEOLOGY. (3 credits). Meets with History 698.001.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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GERMAN 902. Directed Reading.

Section 001.

Prerequisites: Permission of chair. Graduate standing. (1-8).

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for GERMAN.


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