College of LS&A

Winter '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies


This page was created at 9:08 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HJCS

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.


HJCS 472. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature, II.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 Israeli Literature and Film: Narrative and Counter Narratives.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: HJCS 302. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to contemporary Israeli literatures and films while at the same time to develop a theoretical framework that approach these as part of Israeli cultural production. So along with studying specific strategies to articulate Israeli diversity of gender, religion, history and nationhood, we will discuss relevant issues related to cultural studies such as colonialism, hybridity, Orientalism, and multiculturalism. The texts and films selected include a wide range of works by and about the Zionist pioneers, the second generation of immigrants to Israel, Holocaust survivors, women, Sephardic/Mizrahi Jews and Palestinians.

This course is open to undergraduates and graduate students. Graduate students have additional assignments and are expected to write a longer and more theoretically-oriented paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HJCS 577/Judaic Studies 467/Rel. 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 Models of Jewish Renewal.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar explores several key examples of Jewish spiritual questing and renewal in the 20th century. Among the sources to be explored are Martin Buber and his theology of the holiness of relationship (pan-sacramental urge); the communitarian "religion of labor" and longing for wholeness developed by early Zionist writers and kibbutzniks; the intentional community around Kalonymous Kalman Shapira, the rebbe of the Warsaw ghetto, who developed a mystical fellowship and practice of soul-quieting/silence that bears interesting parallels to Vipassana mediation. Over half the course will be devoted to works (texts, memoirs, theology, devotional music) emerging from the so-called "Jewish renewal movement," which seeks sources as diverse as feminism, deep ecology, East Asian contemplative traditions, and "the politics of meaning." Authors to read include Arthur Green, Arthur Waskow, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, Judith Plaskow, Tikkun magazine editor Michael Lerner, Tirzah Firestone, Sylvia Boorstein, and Rodger Kamenetz. (These latter figures explore the growing contemporary interchange between certain Buddhist and Jewish practices). We ask: how do these experiments alter/depart from /up-end/deepen traditional Jewish practices and spiritual direction? In so doing we raise questions regarding the multi-form shape and volatile nature of "Judaism" at the turn of the 21st century. As a final counterpart (or exclamation point), we will explore examples of engaged Orthodox renewal, and the spiritual skepticism and quest of Leon Wieseltier.

The course is conducted as a seminar, with a good deal of give-and-take. It calls for both intellectual rigor and engagement: to understand Judaism not only as "argument" but as "deep song". Occasional film, music, and examples of contemplative practice will deepen our inquire. Background in Judaic Studies or the study of Religion (including contemplative practice will deepen our inquiry. Background in Judaic Studies or the study of Religion (including contemplative traditions) is helpful. Short essays, term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 577/Judaic Studies 467/Rel. 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 002 Jewish Life in Late Antiquity.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will examine some of the most significant aspects of Jewish life in the era ranging from after the destruction of the Second Temple until the beginning of the fifth century (70-429 CE). We will concentrate on reading, analyzing and discussing the primary sources (literary, archaeological, etc., on a given subject). The major body of source material for this epoch in Jewish history is the diversified corpus called rabbinic literature. We will not confine ourselves to these texts, but instead look at a more comprehensive sampling of sources (particularly Christian and archaeological material). There is no language requirement for this course at the 400 level, and all sources will be provided with English translation. Students who wish to take the course on the 500 level will be required to demonstrate reading abilities in one ancient language (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek or Latin), and to prepare an additional paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HJCS 990. Dissertation Research Precandidate.

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HJCS 995. Dissertation Research.

Prerequisites: Graduate School autorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"


Undergraduate Course Listings for HJCS.


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